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Author Topic: Can a single beagle be happy?
LolaRennt
The First USA Noel


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My boyfriend has had a beagle puppy since March or April. Everything we've read has recommended that beagle owners get a second dog (beagle or not). Even my boyfriend's vet has said that some of the beagle's behaviours would go away if he got a second dog.

At this time, my boyfriend does not want a second dog - the puppy is enough. Also, he simply can't afford a second dog. Is it possible to have a well behaved/well adjusted beagle without getting a second dog?

We do make sure that she gets plenty of exercise (walks at least twice a day, session of tug of war and fetch). We're working with her on training. The only issue that we're finding difficult to train away or exercise away is her constant need for attention. She does ok if we ignore her for 5 or 10 minutes. Beyond that she becomes a little demon. She also hates when my boyfriend talks on the phone and starts becoming a demon. Will this start easing up when she gets older or do beagles truly have that high a need for social interaction?

At least she is very friendly and we don't have to worry about her being mean to people or dogs.

LR

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Jenn
Layaway in a Manger


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Is she left alone a lot? Some pets don't handle that very well, and that could explain her acting out so much when he's doing other stuff when he is home. She is a social creature and adores your boyfriend (he's her pack now), hence the constant need for attention. You can't always train away something like that. Lonely and bored pets act out, sometimes getting to the point where they'll destroy the furniture, the yard, or even start inflicting damage on themselves (pulling out their fur, etc).

I would tentatively suggest that perhaps he's not able to provide the best environment for a dog, at least not this one. Perhaps an older dog used to being left alone or a breed that's a bit better at being alone.

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LolaRennt
The First USA Noel


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She's alone while he's at work but he or I go over to the house every day and let her out at lunch time. We play with her or (schedule permitting) take her on a quick walk. We've been told that a dog doesn't need that kind of a break but we both feel it's cruel not to do it.

On the weekends she's out most of the time. We have found that she definitely needs a nap and try to get her to take a nap in the afternoon. For some reason she fights sleep and we have to put her in the crate to get her to sleep. If she's tired, she crashes in a few minutes. It's funny how like a kid that is (minus the crate).

Her normal work day schedule is:
Play time and walk time (around 6 AM)
Feeding, yard time, etc.
Crate if he is alone while he gets dressed or else she gets a second walk and second play time if I'm there
Crate while he's at work
Mid-day break (usually about an hour)
Crate until 5 or 5:30
Walk, play time, etc.
Between 9 or 10 she needs to go to bed (evident by her behaviour and constant yawning)

We've pretty much identified that some of her behaviour has to do with her need for sleep. If she hasn't had a nap (as was the case yesterday), she acts up. I've seen small kids do this so I'm assuming this has something to do with her age.

I've suggested to him that he start training her to be in the guest bedroom during the day (more room to move around). He isn't ready to trust her that far just yet, though.

We put toys in her crate and have even given her the full expanse of the crate since she's now housebroken (mostly). I'm still not convinced that crate training is good for a dog but it's his dog and I have seen that it is a sanity saver. So I guess I shouldn't grumble about it. And I have seen how hard she fights sleeping unless she is in that crate. I'm not sure it'd be good to let her stay out until she just passes out from exhaustion...

My experience is with cats, though, and I think they are far easier.

Oh yeah - I have noticed that we wake her up when we go over there for lunch so I'm guessing that she's sleeping all morning, especially if she gets two walks in one morning.

LR

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nerdymcnerd
Little Sales Drummer Boy


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How old is this puppy? Crate time should be limited to three to four hours for a puppy 6 months or younger. Crating all day and then again at night may also be too much time in a crate.

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LolaRennt
The First USA Noel


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5 1/2 months - your feedback at least reinforces my feeling and my boyfriend's feeling that it's necessary to give her a break from the crate at lunch time. People keep telling us that we shouldn't have to take care of her during lunch. I keep thinking that those people are insane.

LR

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oh pleeze
It's So Cheesy (to Fall in Love)


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quote:
Originally posted by LolaRennt:
People keep telling us that we shouldn't have to take care of her during lunch. I keep thinking that those people are insane.

LR

insane, and a load a crap. i have a 15 week old puppy, and i go home everyday to let her out, give her a small lunch (she has three meals a day until she's 8-10 months - per the vet) then out again to pooh. i've always been lucky enough to run home for lunch when i've gotten a new puppy, i think it helps to house train them quicker, and doesn't put as much strain on their tiny bladders.

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op

i'm taking the afternoon off to stalk my previous boss who fired me for taking afternoons off.

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LolaRennt
The First USA Noel


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I have noticed that the housetraining has been relatively smooth. The only times that there are accidents are when she's having too much fun inside to want to go outside. My boyfriend told me that one time she was playing and just started pooping as she played. He was torn between having a fit and laughing.

She is still a baby in a lot of ways so I do wonder if some of her behaviour isn't just normal puppy behaviour. It's hard for me to tell since, as I said earlier, I have had only cats. One of my cats was semi-psychotic as a kitten which has made me look at some of the puppy's behaviour as normal since she's still nowhere near as bad as my cat was (thankfully).

But the cat was easier to handle since I could put him in a closet and be done with him when he was being bad.

LR

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oh pleeze
It's So Cheesy (to Fall in Love)


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LolaRennt,

i noticed that if you put a small bell on your pup's coller, it's easy to keep track of her. at 5 1/2 months old, she's probably used to which door means out. so when she goes over to the "out door", you might be more apt to hear her, and let her out before she has an accident - it's saved my rugs! good luck.

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op

i'm taking the afternoon off to stalk my previous boss who fired me for taking afternoons off.

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chapman
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by LolaRennt:
At this time, my boyfriend does not want a second dog - the puppy is enough. Also, he simply can't afford a second dog. Is it possible to have a well behaved/well adjusted beagle without getting a second dog?

You can absolutely have a single dog be happy and healthy and well adjusted. The pro of having two dogs is that they bond to each other, lifting some of the burden off of you. But the pro of having only one is that they really bond to you. If you don't have the time/money/energy to put towards two dogs, then do not get a second dog. Focus all of your time and attention on the one, with the full knowledge that you are its pack, and you are everything to it. You are its best friend.

And keep the dog socialized so in a few years if you ever do want a second dog, that transition will go smoothly.

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Mrs. Chicopea
Xboxing Day


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I have a 7 year old beagle named Max. He is a single dog and is as happy as can be. He doesn't destroy furniture or become extremely depressed when someone leaves. We give him plenty of attention and I really think that is what counts. I think in general, yes, it can be nice to have another dog as a companion of sorts, but I don't believe it to be necessary.

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Don't judge someone unless you've walked a mile in their shoes. Then, if you still don't like them, it's ok! You'll be a mile away from them and you'll have their shoes.

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Jackie in the Elevator
Happy Holly Days


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I personally think if you are going to have one, you should have two. It is not that much more of a burden (after they are potty trained) and it is easier on the dogs. When you are out of the house 8 hours a day, at least they have each other to entertain and rely on for comfort.

When we got our beagle (Abbey) I swore I'd never get another dog. Then Nui (the pit bull) came along and I know know we will never have just one dog. Abbey was fine on her own, but she is much happier with Nui. And it doesn't cost that much more to feed two. It's not that much more work, either. YMMV

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Mrs. Chicopea
Xboxing Day


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quote:
Originally posted by Jackie in the Elevator:
I personally think if you are going to have one, you should have two. It is not that much more of a burden (after they are potty trained) and it is easier on the dogs. When you are out of the house 8 hours a day, at least they have each other to entertain and rely on for comfort.

When we got our beagle (Abbey) I swore I'd never get another dog. Then Nui (the pit bull) came along and I know know we will never have just one dog. Abbey was fine on her own, but she is much happier with Nui. And it doesn't cost that much more to feed two. It's not that much more work, either. YMMV

Regarding our dog Max, no one is ever out of the house for more than 2 hours at a time (he lives with my parents). There are 4 people living there. One is a SAHM, the other is a teenager, one does work 8 hours a day and last, but not least, is good ol grandpa who doesn't exactly hit the town every night.

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Don't judge someone unless you've walked a mile in their shoes. Then, if you still don't like them, it's ok! You'll be a mile away from them and you'll have their shoes.

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chapman
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by Jackie in the Elevator:
And it doesn't cost that much more to feed two. It's not that much more work, either. YMMV

It does cost more. It is twice the cost. Twice the food, twice the vet care. And it is more work, especially if you have two puppies! Dogs are not mature until they are around 3-5 years old. I would never ever suggest to someone to get a puppy and introduce another puppy, or even another dog, to the household when they are still trying to get a handle on the one dog acting out. If one dog is acting out, it is obviously not getting its needs met and needs that addressed before another dog is thrown into the mix.

Yes, two dogs can be great (I have two), but no they are not necessary (my mother has 1 very well adjusted, happy dog). They do not need to keep each other company during the day (one of mine is crated when I am not there and is OK with that. they typically sleep when I am not there anyway). They do need lots of love and attention and playtime and exercise, however. And whether they get that from you or from another dog is not the terribly important part.

Look at any rescue/pet site out there. There are clearly dogs out there that needs to be only dogs. It is not inhumane to have single dog households so long as you are able to give that one dog all the love and support it needs.

And quite honestly if you cannot, then the answer is not getting yet another dog, it is questioning why you have the one in the first place.

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Bach_girl
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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quote:
Originally posted by LolaRennt:
My boyfriend has had a beagle puppy since March or April. Everything we've read has recommended that beagle owners get a second dog (beagle or not). Even my boyfriend's vet has said that some of the beagle's behaviours would go away if he got a second dog.

At this time, my boyfriend does not want a second dog - the puppy is enough. Also, he simply can't afford a second dog. Is it possible to have a well behaved/well adjusted beagle without getting a second dog?

We do make sure that she gets plenty of exercise (walks at least twice a day, session of tug of war and fetch). We're working with her on training. The only issue that we're finding difficult to train away or exercise away is her constant need for attention. She does ok if we ignore her for 5 or 10 minutes. Beyond that she becomes a little demon. She also hates when my boyfriend talks on the phone and starts becoming a demon. Will this start easing up when she gets older or do beagles truly have that high a need for social interaction?

At least she is very friendly and we don't have to worry about her being mean to people or dogs.

LR

Not to be rude- but that is probably something you should have researched before getting it. That is the way Beagles are.

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"My Very Educated Mother Just Said Uh-oh! No...Pluto..."~ Steven Colbert

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LolaRennt
The First USA Noel


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Edited to remove snarky comment

She has, over the past couple of weeks, started calming down, although I suspect tonight may be rough for the boyfriend. He had locked his storm door (which I don't have the key to). Since he thought I was taking care of the dog but I couldn't get in, she got no break at lunch.

Believe me, I made him feel plenty guilty about it. Then I forced him to give me his garage code so this won't happen again. I hope the dog really acts out tonight! I won't be there tonight so he can endure it alone!

Ha ha ha! Actually I'm over the anger but it will be amusing to hear about it tomorrow.

LR

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Hazed
We Three Blings


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I have an 8 year old beagle, Samantha, and she has always been our only dog, and she just has the best temperment, has since she was a puppy, but I think we got lucky with her. My aunt had a beagle, and whenever it was alone would bay it's head off.

Unfortunately, we had to leave Sammy alone quite a bit. We still lavish attention on her when we're home and she doesn't misbehave when we're not home, (eat up furniture, soil the house), so I think she's ok.

I think as long as you give your beagle lots of attention when you are home, like we do with Sammy, she should be okay.

Whatever you do, just make sure you give her plenty of exercise, ever after she leaves puppyhood behind. And if you ever start feeling guilty about leaving her or eating in front of her, don't give her people food! Beagles tend to get overweight. We started Sammy on people food and now is she is unhealthily obese.

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Jenn
Layaway in a Manger


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quote:
Originally posted by LolaRennt:
Edited to remove snarky comment

If you're going to remove a snarky comment, it's probably best to just remove it and not say anything. If you're going to tell us there was a snarky comment, you might as well have just left it in.

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"You're the opposite of troll. It's a compliment!"

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the Virgin Marrya
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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[hijack] Jenn - I'm always torn between

"oh, now that I think about it, I didn't need to say that, I'll just edit it out"

and

"But I did say it, and someone may have read it, and be composing a response, if I just edit it out, it'll look like I was being sneaky-snarky"

Does that make sense?

I think I'd tend more towards editing and noting that I've edited it, just for honesty's sake. Is that wrong? [/hijack]

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ToadMagnet
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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Lola, have you tried radio or TV in the room with the puppy when she's alone? Music worked for one friend of mine whose cat hated to be left alone; Animal Planet seems to work for another one. Maybe if BeagleBaby feels less isolated when you're not there, she won't demand constant attention when you are.

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Jenn
Layaway in a Manger


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quote:
Originally posted by marRAYreya:
"But I did say it, and someone may have read it, and be composing a response, if I just edit it out, it'll look like I was being sneaky-snarky"

I don't see anything sneaky about it, it just means that you changed your mind. If you're going to say that you said something snarky, you've just defeated the purpose of removing the comments, IMO. We all now know you were snarky and probably have a good idea to whom or what the snark was directed.

I don't think there's a right or wrong, it just always strikes me as odd to want to remove comments so people don't think you're a jerk but then essentially say "I was previously a jerk in this post."

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