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Author Topic: Pet Peeve Phrases
Nick Theodorakis
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by Green Eggs and Spam:
Here's an annoying redundancy: "free gift." A gift by definition is free. Why not just say "gift"?

Because, oddly enough, the phrase "free gift" is only used when the gift is not really free.

Nick

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Bill
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Nick Theodorakis:
And then there's the unforgettable Mr. Green Jeans.

Nick

My mother thought for many years that his name was "Mr. Green Beans"!

Thanks.

Bill

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Green Eggs and Spam
Deck the Malls


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quote:
Originally posted by Nick Theodorakis:
quote:
Originally posted by Green Eggs and Spam:
Here's an annoying redundancy: "free gift." A gift by definition is free. Why not just say "gift"?

Because, oddly enough, the phrase "free gift" is only used when the gift is not really free.

Nick

Ahhh ... that's true. It's usually $4.95 for shipping and handling, after you buy the $19.95 gadget that you can't live without.
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Peacockalorum
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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quote:
Originally posted by Cactus Wren:
Ever heard a grown woman say "I seepy-tired now"?

I'd respond with "You're so tired you're actually leaking? I'll fetch a cloth."
And possibly some reference to rubber sheets.

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"The outrageous is the reasonable, if introduced politely." -Charles Fort
"A chicken? To celebrate the birth of our Lord- a chicken?!"

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MajorC
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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I have hundreds of these, but I’ll try to contain my rant.*

“All intensive purposes” is my favourite faux pas on this thread. That’s hilarious, but sadly, not surprising these days.

Personally, I hate Should of, Could of, and Would of. I can accept shoulda, coulda and woulda as slang for some strange reason, but I scream “have” at my PC every time I see “of” in print. It bothers me less in Internet forums than in corporate publications or newspapers. Literacy should be a prime criterion of employment for those people.

Misuse of the word “proverbial” has driven me to distraction a couple of times this month alone. I’ll admit, I haven’t looked it up in the dictionary recently, but I’ve often seen or heard someone say something like “He’s a pain in the proverbial”. I know what you think you mean, but really, I just want to respond “which proverb was that then?”

The “I’m dyslexic” excuse is a whole other rant which I may post in full one day. Bottom line is, I believe dyslexia exists and those who really do suffer from it have my sympathy, but it’s seriously overused by people who are just too lazy to think before typing “there” or “their” but somehow manage to type dyslexic rather than disleskik.

"My lover". This is definitely a very regional thing, but if you've ever lived in Bristol, England, as I have for the past 15 years, I defy you to get used to it.

I've been called "my lover" by taxi drivers, shop assistants, complete strangers asking me for directions and even gas meter readers.

It's odd. I can handle "darlin", "dearie", "sweet'eart" and easily "luv" but "my lover" is a Bristolian thing that I really, really hate.

These people also add an “L” to the end of every word that ends with a vowel! “Idea” becomes “ideal” which is rather confusing until you get used to it. I’ve heard the argument that Bristol used to be called Bristo until the locals mangled it and ridiculous as it sounds, I can understand why people think that way.

P.S. I do love the locals, much as their language irritates me. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t still be here.

* I failed, sorry for rambling on and on and on and on.

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Undomesticated equines ...

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ThistleSoftware
Little Sales Drummer Boy


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The "I'm dyslexic" excuse irritates me too. Maybe I am misinformed but I didn't think dyslexia's symptoms included the inability to construct sentences, tell apart homophones, or construct a coherent thought. I have a mild form of dyslexia and it makes me try to be extra careful when I post because I know I might at any moment make a silly typo.

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Officially Heartless

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Esprise Me
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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I'm annoyed by the dyslexia excuse as well. It also bothers me when people describe normal feelings of sadness or disappointment as "depression," as in, "I'm so depressed about that show being cancelled!" It's trivializes the suffering of people who have endured a real loss or have a genuine chemical imbalance and are thus clinically depressed. Ditto people who characterize their odd habits, quirks, and idiosyncrasies as obsessive-compulsive disorders, or their diets as temporary anorexia ("I'm being anorexic today; I've only had a bagel!") or their impatience as attention-deficit disorder.

ETA: Oh, and don't even get me started on chronic fatigue syndrome...

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"If God wrote it, the grammar must be infallible. Perhaps it is we who are mistaken." -MapleLeaf

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Damian
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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Peeve: People that reduce perfectly good swear words to just one letter, as in "Get Effed" or "F You". Either say the proper word or find another word completely.

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"I always tell the truth. Even when I lie." - Tony Montana

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ChickyBee
Deck the Malls


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quote:
"My lover". This is definitely a very regional thing, but if you've ever lived in Bristol, England, as I have for the past 15 years, I defy you to get used to it.

I've been called "my lover" by taxi drivers, shop assistants, complete strangers asking me for directions and even gas meter readers.



My immediate response to this would be something along the lines "Lover? The sex can't be any good because I definately don't remember sleeping with you."

Although on second thoughts, that could take the conversation in a different and uncomfortable direction.

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So many people are hung up on achievements. What did you do today? What are you planning? Sometimes, just getting through the day is an achievement in itself.

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Kiddo
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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I bet all of you would hate to hang out with me because I used over used catch phrases just for fun [Smile]

I got all the people at my work saying "That's how I roll" because it works as an excuse for anything... like, if my boss said "Why did you steal that?" .. I respond, "'Cause that's how I roll".. what is she going to do, try and tell me that's NOT how I roll??? (LOL I KNOW that would never actually work, but I like to tell people it would anyway).

I also like to talk like a gangster even though I'm a white girl.. I say things like "Wut up G".

I guess the fun in it is because I use cliches and catchprases on purpose, because I can not because it's actually part of my vocabulary... if people laugh or look at me funny, then my work is done [Wink]

I also like to shorten words to one sylibal (sp????) wherever possible, "to save time"... like, I work at Tim Hortons (a Canadian coffe/donut shop for those who don't know) and I call Apple Fritters "Frits", the schedule is "Schedge". etc...

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~*~DORI~*~

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candycane from strangers
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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I see you've been registered a couple of months, but since this is your first post welcome to the board, Kiddo!

I kind of do the same thing as you. Frequently when I use an overused phrase I say it while doing air quotes or follow it with "or whatever it is the kids are saying these days" because it makes me laugh.

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Me: "He's 19? Uh oh, I bought him a beer."
A: "You contributed to the deliquency of a minor in drag!"
"Sweet spell check: keeping drunks off the radar since 1995."- IND
God Re-Animate Green Pork Bush

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Towknie
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by candiru from strangers:
"or whatever it is the kids are saying these days"

Says the 21-year-old Snopester.. Candy, you make me laugh.

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Towknie: Ryda-certified as wonderful, enlighted, and rational.

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NZUL
Deck the Malls


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I'd agree with most of the irritations expressed in this thread. Here's a couple more:

"There's nothing worse than...". Okay, yeah, it's pretty bad to have mushrooms on your pizza or to come home to a cold house, but there are a heck of a lot of things worse than that! Besides, there must be only one thing in all of thingdom that there is nothing worse than, so stop using the phrase for every single thing you dislike!

I also hate the tendency of some people, particularly Australians for some reason, to end every sentence with an increase in pitch, turning it into a question. "So I ran into this guy I used to know? He works as a plumber now in Main Street? And he does all these, like, really cool plumbing jobs? Like putting in new taps and stuff?..."

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"We don't keep a certified whale-vomit expert on staff." - Larry Penny, Director, Natural Resources Department, Town of East Hampton

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Mr. Furious
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by Kiddo:
I also like to talk like a gangster even though I'm a white girl.. I say things like "Wut up G".

I stole it from somewhere (damned if I can remember where, though), but sometimes I'll start an "urban" phrase ("wut up" for example), then pretend I have no idea what comes next, looking around furtively, making up stuff as I go along. It goes something like "Wut up! (look) G... (frown) dog... (panic) money..."

I'll also take stereotypical "urban" (I love scare quotes!) phrases and say them in the whitest, cheesiest way possible. If they're outdated, even better. I've been known to say "oh snap!" in a game show host voice, along with an ultra-cheesy arm motion.

I have issues.

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"He's not gonna let me in, I'm Mr. Dirty Mouth!"
- Jeffrey Coho (Craig Bierko), Boston Legal

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Maddie
Rejoice, Rejoice, I've Found the Manuel!


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quote:
I've been known to say "oh snap!" in a game show host voice, along with an ultra-cheesy arm motion.
I've been known to say 'Oh, snap!' in a nasal-ly voice, while sniffling & pushing up my glasses (when I have them on).

(editted to fix quote.)

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"I'm sorry for your loss. Your mother was a terribly attractive woman." - Royal Tenenbaum

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candycane from strangers
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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quote:
Originally posted by Towknie:
quote:
Originally posted by candiru from strangers:
"or whatever it is the kids are saying these days"

Says the 21-year-old Snopester.. Candy, you make me laugh.
[Big Grin]

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Me: "He's 19? Uh oh, I bought him a beer."
A: "You contributed to the deliquency of a minor in drag!"
"Sweet spell check: keeping drunks off the radar since 1995."- IND
God Re-Animate Green Pork Bush

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LeaflessMapleTree
The twelve shopping days 'til Christmas


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The scary thing is that even in my whippersnappery youth there are people younger than I am, using stranger expressions. Like "that's jokes".

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"For me, religion is like a rhinoceros: I don't have one, and I'd really prefer not to be trampled by yours. But it is impressive, and even beautiful, and, to be honest, the world would be slightly worse off if there weren't any."
-Silas Sparkhammer

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Kiddo
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Furious:
quote:
Originally posted by Kiddo:
I also like to talk like a gangster even though I'm a white girl.. I say things like "Wut up G".

I stole it from somewhere (damned if I can remember where, though), but sometimes I'll start an "urban" phrase ("wut up" for example), then pretend I have no idea what comes next, looking around furtively, making up stuff as I go along. It goes something like "Wut up! (look) G... (frown) dog... (panic) money..."

That would be awesome!!!!! There was a girl I used to work with and I was trying to explain something to her but she wasn't getting it and she was jsut staring blankly at me so I just randomly said "Y'know what I'm saying... homie... yo" and she laughed so hard and she was like "What was that?" and I was like "I thought you would get it if I talked gangsta"

There's another girl I work with (can you tell I live at my job lol) named Leanna and I call her L-Diggity and she calls me D-Dawg... man I love gangsta talk...

Oh, and thank you Candiru for welcoming me... I used to be registered here a long time ago, I think my screen name was Mystified... but I didn't come on for a long time and now it tells me they don't recognize the screen name so I just registered again.

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~*~DORI~*~

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Squeaky
Little Discounter Boy


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quote:
Originally posted by MapleLeaf:
The scary thing is that even in my whippersnappery youth there are people younger than I am, using stranger expressions. Like "that's jokes".

I think I am now offically in love with you for using the word whippersnappery [Wink] . I have a tendency to use archaic turns of phrase. Urm...when I don't have an exam in 6 1/2 hours and can remember what some of them are, I may just edit my post >.> <.<.

As for what irritates me: the use of the word "unthaw": "I'm going to take the turkey out of the freezer so it unthaws." To this sort of phrase, I've been known to reply "Why bother taking it out of the freezer then?" To thaw effectively means to melt, therefore unthaw means to freeze.

Also: I. HATE. THE. WORD. IRREGARDLESS!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Don't use it! EVER!!!!! *breathes*

From dictionary.com:
Usage Note: Irregardless is a word that many mistakenly believe to be correct usage in formal style, when in fact it is used chiefly in nonstandard speech or casual writing. Coined in the United States in the early 20th century, it has met with a blizzard of condemnation for being an improper yoking of irrespective and regardless and for the logical absurdity of combining the negative ir- prefix and -less suffix in a single term. Although one might reasonably argue that it is no different from words with redundant affixes like debone and unravel, it has been considered a blunder for decades and will probably continue to be so.


Sorry, having problems with URL code...I think it's past my bedtime. Yay for music history exams! >.<

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"I think I just had an evilgasm."-Xykon, OOTS

"Sacrificing minions: Is there any problem it can't solve?" -Xykon, OOTS

"Whooooooo! I'm invisible!"-Elan, OOTS

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Mr. Furious
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Furious:
I stole it from somewhere (damned if I can remember where, though), but sometimes I'll start an "urban" phrase ("wut up" for example), then pretend I have no idea what comes next, looking around furtively, making up stuff as I go along. It goes something like "Wut up! (look) G... (frown) dog... (panic) money..."

I just remembered where I stole it from. There's a scene in the movie Airheads where Michael McKean is trying to reason with the band members, and he tries to use modern lingo, but has no idea how to complete the phrase once he starts. He says "Look, I know you think I'm a real dick... cheese... burger..."

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"He's not gonna let me in, I'm Mr. Dirty Mouth!"
- Jeffrey Coho (Craig Bierko), Boston Legal

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Arts Myth
The First USA Noel


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quote:
Originally posted by Squeaky:
Also: I. HATE. THE. WORD. IRREGARDLESS!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Don't use it! EVER!!!!! *breathes*

I like using the word around my mother. It makes her pull some interesting faces... She's also very sensitive to "so fun". I'll often work that into a sentence if she's just said "try and," which is one of my peeves.

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Stupid, stupid rat creatures! - Bone
"The missionaries told us not to cut ourselves. It displeases Jesus." - Elsie Clews Parsons, Kiowa Tales, quoted in The Mourner's Dance, Katherine Ashenburg

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VersesBatman
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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This is something my husband and his family say and it drives me crazy:

Me: Ow, I think I have something in my eye! (rubs eyes)

Them: Your finger?

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It's like they took a bunch of movies, put them in a blender and turned it on really fast!-Mystery Science Theater 3000

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Esprise Me
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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quote:
Originally posted by NZUL:
I also hate the tendency of some people, particularly Australians for some reason, to end every sentence with an increase in pitch, turning it into a question. "So I ran into this guy I used to know? He works as a plumber now in Main Street? And he does all these, like, really cool plumbing jobs? Like putting in new taps and stuff?..."

I think that's more of a young people thing than an Australian people thing. Or maybe it's an insecure people thing. Making a statement into a question is how spineless people dodge responsibility for their words. In any case, I hear that all the time from people my age here in Boston, along with: insults preceded by the phrase, "no offense, but" or "I love her, but," incomprehensible statements followed by "you know what I mean?" or "or whatever," and lame, backpedal qualifiers on words that do not lend themselves to qualification, i.e. "she's in a kinda unique position because, like, her boyfriend is sorta in a coma, and she's kinda, like, pregnant."

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"If God wrote it, the grammar must be infallible. Perhaps it is we who are mistaken." -MapleLeaf

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Cactus Wren
Jingle Bell Hock


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quote:
Originally posted by NZUL:
"There's nothing worse than...". Okay, yeah, it's pretty bad to have mushrooms on your pizza or to come home to a cold house, but there are a heck of a lot of things worse than that! Besides, there must be only one thing in all of thingdom that there is nothing worse than, so stop using the phrase for every single thing you dislike!

Oddly enough, I tend to go in the opposite direction: X, for that particular moment's specific value of X, is "better than anything". (But I still say that when you've been out barefoot in the cold wet grass with the orange-picker and then brought in a bagful and juiced them, fresh orange juice is better than anything. Except my housemate's potato salad.)

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“Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar.” -- Edward R. Murrow

IOToriSparrowANK!

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Joe Bentley
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by Damian:
Peeve: People that reduce perfectly good swear words to just one letter, as in "Get Effed" or "F You". Either say the proper word or find another word completely.

I'm probably alone on this one, but I feel the same way about the phrase "The N-Word."

Nigger is a horrible word that I would never level against another human being, but during the O.J. Simpson trial having news reporters and even lawyers and judges in a legal setting being reduced to using an euphemism for a word was just frickin' stupid.

Did anyone here not know what the reporters and lawyers were saying when the used the "N-Word" euphemism? I am alone in my brain just automatically filling that phrase in?

I mean I can certainly understand not using the word in reference to another person, but to be so anal about that you can even say it in reference to an event or another person saying it? That's just plain damn dumb. A lawyer arguing a case in front of a judge or a reporter reporting the news should not be forced to talk as if he's discussing a Dirty Sanchez in front of the Pope.

I mean a get a phrase so bad you can't call someone it, but a phrase so bad you can't even say it? I don't get that.

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"Existence has no pattern save what we imagine after staring at it for too long." - Rorschach, The Watchmen

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Silkenreindeer
Wassaleing


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This is a Brit expression, but drives me crazy nonetheless.

When someone is unwell, people around here tend to say that they're "Poorly". Poorly is an adverb. It needs to be connected to a verb or adjective - and it describes the quality of that verb or adjective, rather than a state of being on its own. It cannot just sit there at the end of the sentance unaccompanied. It makes no sense.

Joe - I agree entirely. Refusing to name a word when discussing it is giving power to the word in question.

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Mistletoey Chloe
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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It jolly well can. It's been sitting unaccompanied since the sixteenth century, so has become quite good at it.

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~~Ai am in mai prrrrrraime!~~

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Christie
The Bills of St. Mary's


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quote:
Originally posted by Silkenreindeer:
Joe - I agree entirely. Refusing to name a word when discussing it is giving power to the word in question.

I disagree. If you are uncomfortable saying a certain word then, depending on the context, I see nothing wrong with using an acceptable method of conveying what you mean rather than saying the word.

To deliberately do otherwise, just because you can, reminds me of a child who first learns that using the word "dam" can be acceptable so they go out of their way to use it. "Mom did you know beavers build dams :snicker: yep, dams is what they build :giggle: teacher says dams are..." Well you get the idea.

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If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs, it's just possible you haven't grasped the situation. - Jean Kerr

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Egg Note
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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Casual gamers.

I suppose it's not really the phrase itself as much as the people who think they're going to be ultimate cause of the destruction of the video game industry.

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Okay, just to make it clear, there is a real world out there. No really, there is. I checked.

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Silkenreindeer
Wassaleing


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quote:
Originally posted by Mistletoey Chloe:
It jolly well can. It's been sitting unaccompanied since the sixteenth century, so has become quite good at it.

And "axe" has been an alternative version of "ask" for at least as long. Still bugs the hell out of me.

Christie - It's not like that at all. I would never dream of calling anyone a racially insulting term, and I certainly don't go out of my way to find contexts in which I can say them and giggle. But if I'm talking about any word as a word I'm not going to censor it (unless circumstances dictate otherwise). There is no juvenile thrill there, and there is no rush of doing the forbidden. I just don't see how censoring a racist term when talking about the racist term itself helps prevent racism.

Posts: 494 | From: Epping, Essex, UK | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Mistletoey Chloe
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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Actually "aeks" significantly predates "ask." "Ask" is a metathetical corruption.

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~~Ai am in mai prrrrrraime!~~

Posts: 10111 | From: Oklahoma | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silkenreindeer
Wassaleing


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Which, if anything, proves the point even more. Pet peeves do not have to be logical. That's why they're pet peeves.
Posts: 494 | From: Epping, Essex, UK | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Mistletoey Chloe
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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I understand that. I was not trying to change your mind about your pet peeve, which is all yours and welcome, but to correct the inaccuracies in "Poorly is an adverb. It needs to be connected to a verb or adjective - and it describes the quality of that verb or adjective, rather than a state of being on its own. It cannot just sit there at the end of the sentance unaccompanied. It makes no sense." Because a) "Poorly" is also an adjective, and has been since at least 1573, b) as such it doesn't need to be connected to a verb or an adjective, c) it can therefore sit there at the end of a sentence unaccompanied, and d) given the above information, it certainly does make sense.

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~~Ai am in mai prrrrrraime!~~

Posts: 10111 | From: Oklahoma | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silkenreindeer
Wassaleing


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Thanks! I didn't know that. [Smile]

In case it isn't clear, I mean no snark at all. I love learning new things about language.

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Cactus Wren
Jingle Bell Hock


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A former cow-orker of mine drove me crazy with her references to something called "Peps". Apparently if the short name for Coca-Cola is "Coke", the short name for Pepsi-Cola -- by her logic -- is "Peps". So it was, "Did I leave a Peps in the fridge?" or "I'm going up to the food court, want me to bring you a Peps?"

(Now I'm reminded of a certain popular TV cook whose brisket recipe starts with a two-hundred-word paragraph which boils down to "Sear the meat", but who grudges the syllables to say "extra virgin olive oil".)

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“Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar.” -- Edward R. Murrow

IOToriSparrowANK!

Posts: 598 | From: Arizona | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
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