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Author Topic: I've been burglarized!!! UPDATE!!!!
Hans Off
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
A couple of years back, I used "burgle" and "burglarize" when I wrote this short linguistic rant for a newsletter:

British English speakers point to Americans adding more syllables so that they can make even more noise without actually saying anything.

God I am burgling your quote for my new sig line!!!

Your words? Of a quote form somewhere?

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"British English speakers point to Americans adding more syllables so that they can make even more noise without actually saying anything." Llewtrah


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Bonnie
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:

While on this rant, there is a definite need to teach people the difference between verbs and nouns and how to use them. [...] Obsess is not a verb, it is a noun - you "have an obsession about something" you don't "obsess about something".

It's not a verb? Isn't its transitive form used in British English? Please don't tell me y'all prefer "I have an obsession with this message board" to "I am obsessed with this message board."

I suspect that your real displeasure lies in its intransitive form (e.g., "I obsess over word usage"), which appeared in American English at least 30 years ago and which is now, I think, pretty prevalent over here. All I can say is that if it's good enough for The New York Times it's good enough for me.

(And surely you don't mean that "obsess" is a noun. The OED says its only usage as a noun is 18th-century and [now] obsolete. And even then the meaning is "a blockade or siege.")

-- Bonnie

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ParaDiddle
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I'm not a burglar, but I get to play one at work. Every so often, I get a call that requires forced entry. When I get to the scene, I first determine if there is any sort of life hazard. Finding none, I try to pull the reins of my crew. I tell them "Let's think like a burglar"

In my explanation, I tell them that there is a way to get inside while making minimal noise and causing little or no damage. A perfect example happened a few days ago.

We receivd a residential alarm in the mansion district along Milwaukee's lakefront. The place was locked up tight, nobody was home and the alarm company had no contact info for a keyholder. After I gave my initial speech, one of the guys noticed an external keypad on the garage door. He pried it of then shorted the wires inside. Up went the door.

The garage lead to a breezeway, that door was open. Inside the breezeway, the door to the home was locked. We started looking around. I had the crew check under the doormats and inside most of the items and containers stored in the breezway. Then, I looked up at the light fixture. I'm 6'2" and my reach is just above eight feet. The light fixture hovered at about seven feet. That's where the key was.

It turned out to be a false alarm, but it sure was a well appointed place to have an amateur burlar gain access in only 45 seconds. As it turned out, the alarm had malfunctioned and sent a false fire alarm ($250 citation) and didn't even send an entry alarm when we went in. Total damage was around $50 to the garage opener keypad.

- P

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Signora Del Drago
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quote:
Originally posted by annabohly:
Ok whatever.. [Wink]

Some jacka$$ broke into my house and stole my $hit!!!!(shoud I put that in the topic title...lol)

Good one! [lol]

Random thoughts while reading this thread.

A home invasion is more than just burglary. Intruders may enter by force or simply by an unlocked door, but this term is used when a house is illegally entered while people are at home, as opposed to breaking into an unoccupied house.

Obsess is indeed a verb.

tomayto, tomahto. Who cares whether a person says burgle or burglarize? I don't look down my nose at a person who says "burgle," so why would anyone direct a feeling of linguistic superiority toward a person who says "burglarize?" I'm just curious since both are correct.

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"This air we're breathing. Oxygen, isn't it?"~I’mNotDedalus, impersonating Vincent D’Onofrio.|"Sometimes trying to communicate can be like walking through a minefield."~wanderwoman
"Give people a break. It's not easy doing a life."~Joshua Halberstam

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Bonnie
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:

In the 19th century, there arose a need for a verb less cumbersome than the construction "to commit [an act of] burglary". In the UK, the verb "burgle" was back-formed from "burglar".

I'm curious, what evidence do we have that "burgle" originated in the United Kingdom?

-- Bonnie

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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by Signora Del Drago:
A home invasion is more than just burglary. Intruders may enter by force or simply by an unlocked door, but this term is used when a house is illegally entered while people are at home, as opposed to breaking into an unoccupied house.

Did anybody say it was just a burglary? I said it was a robbery, sometimes with assault, that takes place in a home. If the home were unoccupied, it wouldn't be a robbery.

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Signora Del Drago
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quote:
Originally posted by Lainie:
quote:
Originally posted by Signora Del Drago:
A home invasion is more than just burglary. Intruders may enter by force or simply by an unlocked door, but this term is used when a house is illegally entered while people are at home, as opposed to breaking into an unoccupied house.

Did anybody say it was just a burglary? I said it was a robbery, sometimes with assault, that takes place in a home. If the home were unoccupied, it wouldn't be a robbery.
Sorry, Lainie. I should have said to whom I was addressing that. I guess I missed your post and was replying to MissE's question. I went back through the thread and found where you had already defined home invasion. My either not seeing or not remembering your post was just a mistake on my part. I didn't mean to antagonize you. Honest.

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"This air we're breathing. Oxygen, isn't it?"~I’mNotDedalus, impersonating Vincent D’Onofrio.|"Sometimes trying to communicate can be like walking through a minefield."~wanderwoman
"Give people a break. It's not easy doing a life."~Joshua Halberstam

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Llewtrah
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quote:
Originally posted by Hans Off:
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
A couple of years back, I used "burgle" and "burglarize" when I wrote this short linguistic rant for a newsletter:

British English speakers point to Americans adding more syllables so that they can make even more noise without actually saying anything.

God I am burgling your quote for my new sig line!!!

Your words? Of a quote form somewhere?

The actual words are mine, but the polysyllabic Americans idea has been around for decades in the UK.

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Llewtrah
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quote:
Originally posted by Bonnie:
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:

In the 19th century, there arose a need for a verb less cumbersome than the construction "to commit [an act of] burglary". In the UK, the verb "burgle" was back-formed from "burglar".

I'm curious, what evidence do we have that "burgle" originated in the United Kingdom?
I checked through several dictionaries and word histories when I wrote the rant (being a short opinion piece in a newsletter footnotes and references were not requested so I didn't keep them) and these use "first printed usage" as their evidence of where a word originated.

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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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quote:
Originally posted by Signora Del Drago:

Obsess is indeed a verb.

Maybe on that side of the pond you might have "I obsess, you obsess" etc (which sounds really jarring to British ears), but round here the normal (and what we'd probably insist is the "correct" form) form is "I am obsessed with, you are obsessed with" or "I have an obsession with". Hence "obsess" was counted as back-formation from the noun "obsession" (not by me, but by the sources I was using at the time I wrote the piece).

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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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quote:
Originally posted by Steve:
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
In American English, the rather cumbersome "burglarize" is preferred (and is about 30 times more common in print) and purists object to "burgle" because they view it as back-formation while "burglarize" uses a regular rule (regular, that is, in American English). In fact both verbs come from a noun and both were therefore back-formations.

But a back-formation isn't a verb that comes from a noun. It's a word created by removing an affix from a longer word. Hence "burgle" is a backformation and "burglarize" isn't.
Your definition differs from the ones I found when I wrote it.

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Bonnie
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:

I checked through several dictionaries and word histories when I wrote the rant (being a short opinion piece in a newsletter footnotes and references were not requested so I didn't keep them) and these use "first printed usage" as their evidence of where a word originated.

I'm reasonably certain that "burgle," despite its paucity of extra syllables, is an American invention. As you may remember, the OED (Second edition, 1989) gives these early citations,

quote:
1872 M. COLLINS Pr. Clarice I iv. 63 The burglar who attempted to enter that room would never burgle again. 1874 Standard 14 Nov. 3 New words with which the American vocabulary has lately been enriched; 'to burgle', meaning to injure a person by breaking into his or her house.
Although Mortimer Collins was an English novelist, a piece that had appeared on page 44 of the 5 February 1870 issue of Punch [1] (reprinted below in The Chicago Tribune, 20 March 1870, Pg. 5) bemoaned "burgle," blaming this coinage on Americans.

quote:
American Slangography

People who have any reverence for "the pure well of English undefiled," must wish that the Americans would have left that well alone, and not defile it with such hideous corruptions as the following:

[...]

A paragraph in an evening paper was headed thus: "A Woman Burgled Nine Times in Ten Years."

Fancy the dismay of dear old Dr. Johnson at reading such uncouth phraseology as this! Imagine him devouring Yankee newspapers for breakfast! With how many a cup of tea could he gulp down, without choking, their grammarless contents! And when afterward discussing them in cold blood, with what rotundity of phrase would he give vent to his just wrath. Conceive the Great Lexicographer admitting to his dictionary such exercises as this: "Burgle, verb active, 'To break into a house,'"

[...]

I've been able to find printed forms of "burgle" that slightly antedate the OED's findings. The word seems to first appear in American newspapers just after the Civil War. For example,

quote:
[From "New England News," The Hartford (Connecticut) Daily Courant, 15 October 1867; Pg. 8.]

The store of Elihu Potter of Noauk was burgled, Friday night, of articles of small value.

[From "New England News," The Hartford Daily Courant, 18 October 1867, Pg. 8.]

Three villains burgled the house of Asher Briggs, at Canterbury, on the 6th, while the family was absent, with the exception of one son, who was knocked senseless by the robbers.

[From The Daily Columbus (Georgia) Enquirer, 24 July 1869, Pg. 1]

The unknown adventurer who burgled Plymouth Church had his labor for his pains.

I wonder, are there still earlier British sightings, ones that antedate American uses?

(By the way, I've found appearances of "burglarize" in American publications going back to 1840; these truly precede the OED’s entries.)

quote:
Maybe on that side of the pond you might have "I obsess, you obsess" etc (which sounds really jarring to British ears), but round here the normal (and what we'd probably insist is the "correct" form) form is "I am obsessed with, you are obsessed with" or "I have an obsession with".
Well, then, I'm glad to know y'all do use "obsess" as a verb as well. I'm sorry to hear, though, that its intransitive form hasn't become acceptable over there yet -- it's quite handy.

-- Bonnie

[1] The full citation appears in J.W. Stedman's "American English in Punch, 1841-1900," American Speech 28(3): 171-180, 1953.

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Max_Renn
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I was across the continent at grad school when I got a phone call from my folks telling me the house had been broken into. They got several TVs and VCRs, a bunch of my mom's jewellery and hundreds of my CDs that I hadn't taken to school with me. That last one was frustrating, as I had a lot of CD-singles, EPs and bootlegs that were hard to replace, some of which I still haven't found copies of eleven years later. We did count our blessings: they didn't hurt the cats, and no humans were home at the time. Plus my mom was wearing her wedding ring at the time, and losing some of her other jewellery wasn't the end of the world.

I can only second the other advice given: record all serial numbers, and do a videotaped walking tour through all your stuff, keeping the tape in a safe deposit box or elsewhere off-site. A safe hidden somewhere in the house isn't that extravagant when it comes to important documents, deeds, insurance policies and key pieces of jewellery.

My sympathies...

Max "unless the police give the thief his copy..." Renn

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Signora Del Drago
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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
quote:
Originally posted by Signora Del Drago:

Obsess is indeed a verb.

Maybe on that side of the pond you might have "I obsess, you obsess" etc (which sounds really jarring to British ears), but round here the normal (and what we'd probably insist is the "correct" form) form is "I am obsessed with, you are obsessed with" or "I have an obsession with". Hence "obsess" was counted as back-formation from the noun "obsession" (not by me, but by the sources I was using at the time I wrote the piece).
It appears that you think only your perception of what is the correct form is correct. It makes me wonder why I bothered to provide a cite. Just because it sounds jarring to your ears does not make it incorrect. Why do you obsess so? Live and let live. I must admit that incorrect use of words bothers me, too, but when a word is correct, it is correct, whether or not you or I like it.

"The first step to senility is to believe you have all the answers.". . . unknown
I know I don't have all the answers. How about you?

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"This air we're breathing. Oxygen, isn't it?"~I’mNotDedalus, impersonating Vincent D’Onofrio.|"Sometimes trying to communicate can be like walking through a minefield."~wanderwoman
"Give people a break. It's not easy doing a life."~Joshua Halberstam

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DevilBunny
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Who cares whether a person says burgle or burglarize?

Me.

Devil 'Was that a trick question?' Bunny

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"For God has seven thousand names, and one of them is bastard"

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Nick Theodorakis
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quote:
Originally posted by DevilBunny:
Who cares whether a person says burgle or burglarize?

Me.

Devil 'Was that a trick question?' Bunny

I prefer "burglarizate." [Big Grin]

Nick

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annabohly
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Good news regarding my diamond ring that was stolen. My DH bought it at Zales in June for our 16th wedding anniversary. We went to the store on Tuesday(my birthday) to talk to them. DH said that the saleslady talked him into some kind of diamond protection plan that covered the ring, no matter what the circumstances of loss were. Well the receipt showed that we only had an extended warrenty [Frown]

The saleslady was there and she turned out to be the Regional manager. She remembered my DH and the plan that was supposed to be on the ring. She said let her see what she could do.

She called later that night and said we could get the ring for whatever our homeowners insurance will cover for the ring. That's $1500.00.

I was so relived because we had only made a few payments on the ring. [Smile] [Smile]

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quiltsbypam
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Yay anna-boo-hly! It's a little bit like a second gift.

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2ys4u
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Getting robbed is a horrible thing to deal with.

I don't like saying "burgled" it reminds me of the Hamburglar. I like "robbed" because it can describe many things, like being robbed of your privacy, security, and items. It makes more sense to me that way. And I like saying "theif" instead of "burglar". You can say "theif" so much more forcefully and with more rage since you can spit the "th" out and it has the "f" at the end.

But ANYWAY, that is horrible that it was during the day! I always feel safer about things not getting stolen during the day. I guess I shouldn't have that false sense of security!

That's wonderful news about the ring too, ven though it's not the original, at least it wasn't a ring he gave you 10 years ago that was irreplaceable. Know what I mean?

Also, about leaving things in the car, take it from someone who has had their whole car stolen: Do not leave anything in the car that you don't want to get stolen. I basically lived in my car and when it got stolen, I lost over 200 cd's, pictures, clothes, bank statments, among other things.

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