snopes.com Post new topic  Post a reply
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Urban Legends » Fauxtography » Alien baby? (Page 3)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3   
Author Topic: Alien baby?
Sister Ray
Little Sales Drummer Boy


Icon 303 posted      Profile for Sister Ray   Author's Homepage   E-mail Sister Ray   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by nobodytil2013:
I completely agree with Keeper of the Mad Bunnies...I can't believe I just said "Keeper of the Mad Bunnies". The controversy surrounding depleted uranium munitions, whether the accusations are truth or merely fabrications, needs to be discussed openly. If the rumors are false--nothing is lost. But if cancer rates are skyrocketing because of American bullets, I for one want to know about it.

Cancer probably is one defect you can associate with depleted uranium. HI is not, and neither is any of the birth defects on the link above - they are all folic acid defects.

From what I have read, HI is simple and inherited. I suppose it is theoretically possible to have one gene mutate into an HI gene. But to get the disease, you need two copies of the gene. Not a mutation you would see.

I agree that we should discuss the issue of depleted uranium, and that there are valid health risks from it, but taking a bunch of babies that have non-related illnesses and putting them up on the web saying: "Depleted uranium caused this!!!!!!!!" is ridiculous. It just makes someone look uneducated. In the link above that I posted, I automatically will question what that guy says because he can't even label birth defects, even common ones. (And the case of spina bifida he posts isn't that severe. It looks horrific, but the lesion is a low one. Chances are better in those cases.)

Sister "do your homework, NFBSK it!" Ray

--------------------
The Organization. Adam Haseeb Memorial Pages. My library.

"There can't be a war on Christmas. Even Cambridge has decorations up!" - an observation I made

Posts: 2719 | From: Chicago, IL | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Ryda Wong, EBfCo.
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Ryda Wong, EBfCo.   E-mail Ryda Wong, EBfCo.   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by PallasAthena:
Is anyone else familiar with the idea of a "monstrous" birth in folk tales? As in the mother gives birth to something so horrible that the audience can't even imagine what it was like.

A bit of a reach back, but it is an interesting point. Often, the women said to bear these children were accused of witchcraft, violating gender roles, or, simply, seeing an animal or frightning apparation at or near birth (hare lip = seeing a rabbit near birth).


An example from history is the child midwifed by Anne Hutchinson. Gov. John Winthrop described it as follows: "It was a woman child, stillborn, about two months before the just time, having life a few hours before; it came hiplings [breach birth] till she turned it; it was of ordinary bigness; it had a face, but no head, and the ears stood upon the shoulders and were like an ape's; it had no forehead, but over the eyes four horns, hard and sharp, two of them were above one inch long, the other two shorter; the eyes standing out, and the mouth also; the nose hooked upward all over the breast and back, full of sharp pricks and scales, like a thornback; the navel and all the belly, with the distinction of the sex, were where the back should be; and the back and hips before, where the belly should have been; behind, between the shoulders, it had two mouths, and in each of them a piece of red flesh sticking out; it had arms and legs as other children; but, instead of toes, it had on each foot three claws, like a young fowl, with sharp talons."

A couple of quick links. I have MUCH better sources in my collection at home, but none here.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nwa/dyer.html or http://www.eiu.edu/~historia/2001/maidens.htm.


Anyway, note the prevalence of animalistic metaphors in the (admittidly overblown description) description, as well as the insistance on switched charechteristics (back to front, front to back), and the presence of orifaces where none should be. Animal-human, back-front, violation of body boundries, overt presence of organs of consumption... All charechteristic descriptions of the grotesque, and the grotesque is inherently a threat to the dichotamious nature of traditional belief systems.

--------------------
So many spankings! It feels so good! But at the same time, I don't care about meeting your family! - I'mNotDedalus:

Posts: 3216 | From: Denver, CO | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Neffti Noel
We Three Blings


Icon 606 posted      Profile for Neffti Noel     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by PallasAthena:
Is anyone else familiar with the idea of a "monstrous" birth in folk tales?

I appreciate you were talking about older tales, but your post put me in mind of a quite recent example - the 1980s BBC TV series "Threads" which pictured Britain under massive nuclear attack and followed the "lives" of a generation struggling to survive afterwards.

The final scene was of the daughter of the family giving birth, ending with a shot of her horrified reaction as a midwife handed her her blanket-covered baby. Freeze frame - the story ends - the audience never sees the baby.

Posts: 1157 | From: Westcountry UK "It's Bootiful" | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
jenn schnarr
Ron Mexico


Icon 1 posted      Profile for jenn schnarr   E-mail jenn schnarr   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ryda Wong:
quote:
Originally posted by PallasAthena:
Is anyone else familiar with the idea of a "monstrous" birth in folk tales? As in the mother gives birth to something so horrible that the audience can't even imagine what it was like.

A bit of a reach back, but it is an interesting point. Often, the women said to bear these children were accused of witchcraft, violating gender roles, or, simply, seeing an animal or frightning apparation at or near birth (hare lip = seeing a rabbit near birth).

When exactly did you become an expert on uranium and birth defects? You should do a little thing called research as "keeper of the mad bunnies" odviously did before you have the audasity to say that someone sounds uneducated because they speculate that there is a link between uranium & birth defects. As he said, a simple search of middle eastern birth defects and uranium prove some quite damming evidence that there is a link. And how exactly do you know that the baby pics are not suffering from a uranium related mutation or disease??? Did you take them personally??? If anything makes someone seem uneducated, it's ignorance Sister Ray.


An example from history is the child midwifed by Anne Hutchinson. Gov. John Winthrop described it as follows: "It was a woman child, stillborn, about two months before the just time, having life a few hours before; it came hiplings [breach birth] till she turned it; it was of ordinary bigness; it had a face, but no head, and the ears stood upon the shoulders and were like an ape's; it had no forehead, but over the eyes four horns, hard and sharp, two of them were above one inch long, the other two shorter; the eyes standing out, and the mouth also; the nose hooked upward all over the breast and back, full of sharp pricks and scales, like a thornback; the navel and all the belly, with the distinction of the sex, were where the back should be; and the back and hips before, where the belly should have been; behind, between the shoulders, it had two mouths, and in each of them a piece of red flesh sticking out; it had arms and legs as other children; but, instead of toes, it had on each foot three claws, like a young fowl, with sharp talons."

A couple of quick links. I have MUCH better sources in my collection at home, but none here.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nwa/dyer.html or http://www.eiu.edu/~historia/2001/maidens.htm.


Anyway, note the prevalence of animalistic metaphors in the (admittidly overblown description) description, as well as the insistance on switched charechteristics (back to front, front to back), and the presence of orifaces where none should be. Animal-human, back-front, violation of body boundries, overt presence of organs of consumption... All charechteristic descriptions of the grotesque, and the grotesque is inherently a threat to the dichotamious nature of traditional belief systems.


Posts: 15 | From: St. Paul, MN | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
jenn schnarr
Ron Mexico


Icon 1 posted      Profile for jenn schnarr   E-mail jenn schnarr   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
WTF!!! I don't know how the above post got so messed up! that was't the quote I wanted at All!! lol
Posts: 15 | From: St. Paul, MN | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Sister Ray
Little Sales Drummer Boy


Icon 218 posted      Profile for Sister Ray   Author's Homepage   E-mail Sister Ray   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jenn schnarr:

When exactly did you become an expert on uranium and birth defects? You should do a little thing called research as "keeper of the mad bunnies" odviously did before you have the audasity to say that someone sounds uneducated because they speculate that there is a link between uranium & birth defects. As he said, a simple search of middle eastern birth defects and uranium prove some quite damming evidence that there is a link. And how exactly do you know that the baby pics are not suffering from a uranium related mutation or disease??? Did you take them personally??? If anything makes someone seem uneducated, it's ignorance Sister Ray.


If you have damning evidence, I'd like to see it. I saw HI, and that is autosomal recessive. You are making the extrordinary claim - back it up. Don't just show me folic acid defects.

I've done research, plenty of it. I believe knowledge is powerful. Nothing I have seen is anything but a birth defect, and it is not related to depleted uranium.

How are folic acid defects and HI caused by radiation exposure? Don't say a gene mutated because most of these defects are not genetic.

Sister "not making any claims but the facts, ma'am" Ray

--------------------
The Organization. Adam Haseeb Memorial Pages. My library.

"There can't be a war on Christmas. Even Cambridge has decorations up!" - an observation I made

Posts: 2719 | From: Chicago, IL | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
jenn schnarr
Ron Mexico


Icon 1 posted      Profile for jenn schnarr   E-mail jenn schnarr   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
but taking a bunch of babies that have non-related illnesses and putting them up on the web saying: "Depleted uranium caused this!!!!!!!!" is ridiculous. It just makes someone look uneducated. In the link above that I posted, I automatically will question what that guy says because he can't even label birth defects, even common ones. (And the case of spina bifida he posts isn't that severe. It looks horrific, but the lesion is a low one. Chances are better in those cases.)

When exactly did you become an expert on uranium and birth defects? You should do a little thing called research as "keeper of the mad bunnies" odviously did before you have the audasity to say that someone sounds uneducated because they speculate that there is a link between uranium & birth defects. As he said, a simple search of middle eastern birth defects and uranium prove some quite damming evidence that there is a link. And how exactly do you know that the baby pics are not suffering from a uranium related mutation or disease??? Did you take them personally??? If anything makes someone seem uneducated, it's ignorance Sister Ray.


Sister "do your homework, NFBSK it!" Ray [/QB][/QUOTE]

Posts: 15 | From: St. Paul, MN | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Sister Ray
Little Sales Drummer Boy


Icon 303 posted      Profile for Sister Ray   Author's Homepage   E-mail Sister Ray   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Not sure what you wanted to say in the previous post, but I'll reiterate my point. These, with the exception of HI, aren't genetic. They are typically associated with a lack of folic acid. Given that prenatal care is probably substandard in these cases, it's not surprising. (Spina bifida can also be associated with maternal alcohol use. However, I'm not sure if that comes into play here.) Most also can be easily fixed. HI is lethal, but cleft palate is not. A quick trip to the OR would fix it. The person on the page above not only cannot id HI, he doesn't even recognize a pair of twins!

Sister "a twin so I should know" Ray

--------------------
The Organization. Adam Haseeb Memorial Pages. My library.

"There can't be a war on Christmas. Even Cambridge has decorations up!" - an observation I made

Posts: 2719 | From: Chicago, IL | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
jenn schnarr
Ron Mexico


Icon 1 posted      Profile for jenn schnarr   E-mail jenn schnarr   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
BTW sis Ray my nephew was born with a double cleft palate and a "quick trip to the OR" does not fix it. He is 26 and has had well over a dozen surgeries in his life, 7 of which were before the age of 10. So, if you are so severly mistaken about that don't you think there is a possibility that you are underestimating the effects of HI?
Posts: 15 | From: St. Paul, MN | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
jenn schnarr
Ron Mexico


Icon 1 posted      Profile for jenn schnarr   E-mail jenn schnarr   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
BTW sis Ray my nephew was born with a double cleft palate and a "quick trip to the OR" does not fix it. He is 26 and has had well over a dozen surgeries in his life, 7 of which were before the age of 10. So, if you are so severly mistaken about that don't you think there is a possibility that you are underestimating the effects of HI?
Posts: 15 | From: St. Paul, MN | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Sister Ray
Little Sales Drummer Boy


Icon 218 posted      Profile for Sister Ray   Author's Homepage   E-mail Sister Ray   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
You still have not offered any evidence for your claims. I still want to see it.

Cleft palate varies, obviously. Some cases are more severe and some come with other malformations, due to the lack of folic acid. Were all the surgeries to fix the cleft palate, or were some on the structure of the face itself?

Sister "not holding my breath for it" Ray

--------------------
The Organization. Adam Haseeb Memorial Pages. My library.

"There can't be a war on Christmas. Even Cambridge has decorations up!" - an observation I made

Posts: 2719 | From: Chicago, IL | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
ThistleSoftware
Little Sales Drummer Boy


Icon 1 posted      Profile for ThistleSoftware     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jenn schnarr:
BTW sis Ray my nephew was born with a double cleft palate and a "quick trip to the OR" does not fix it. He is 26 and has had well over a dozen surgeries in his life, 7 of which were before the age of 10. So, if you are so severly mistaken about that don't you think there is a possibility that you are underestimating the effects of HI?

She said HI was lethal. How is she underestimating the effects of it?

--------------------
Officially Heartless

Posts: 3065 | From: The Montgomery County of the West Coast- Berkeley, CA | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Lizzy
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lizzy   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
This child looks like (s)he suffers from HI, like the caption says. Could the child actually be living?

--------------------
"Do you see me now? I'm like a fireball . . . with these shoulder pads I have the strength to destroy villages, homes and crops. GEM SWEATER!"

Posts: 72 | From: Dayton, OH | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Prometheus
Acura-puncture


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Prometheus     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Just a quick note: TLC showed an interesting documentary last night called "My skin could kill me" and it was about two british sisters (Lucy and Hannah Betts) that were born with the Harlequin Fetus disease and actually survived. I didn't catch the whole show so I'm not sure if they were twins or if Hannah was just a younger sister but Lucy was in her late teens (maybe early 20's) and was doing well as a daycare teaching assistant. Her sister Hannah was born with mild mental retardation and some physical birth defects such as short fingers. Lucy is also legally blind in one eye. The program also featured another family that had two "Harlequin Fetus" children that also survived and will most likely live a long, full life.
Posts: 32 | From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
PallasAthena
Xboxing Day


Icon 1 posted      Profile for PallasAthena     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Prometheus, I saw part of that show too. It was fascinating and inspiring to see how the girls were tackling life with HI. They showed 2 families. For both families, both children had HI. Towards the end of the show, they met with doctors who told the parents that they all share a rare recessive gene. Turns out their very ancient ancestors had been related or something like that. At any rate, they would have all been able to trace their geneology way back to a very specific location.

Supposedly, if the girls married, the mother said that there would be no reason she wouldn't be able to give birth to perfectly normal child. The gene is so rare that the chances of her HI daughter giving birth to an HI baby were slim to none. I did find it interesting that for both sets of parents, all the children had HI.

--------------------
"How do you make chocolate? You take dark chocolate, you mix it with white milk, and it becomes a delicious drink. That is the chocolate I am talking about." --Ray Nagin

Posts: 1325 | From: Missouri | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Rhiandmoi
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rhiandmoi   E-mail Rhiandmoi   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
It was also interesting that through the genetic testing they saw IIRC 2 possible genes that could be defective makeing the HI skin missing protiens, and that they might be able to add that to the creams to help the treatement.
All the older girls seemed like great kids. The baby seemed uncomfortable and itchy, but the older kids seemed to take their condition in stride.

--------------------
I think that hyperbole is the single greatest factor contributing to the decline of society. - My friend Pat.

What is .02 worth?

Posts: 8745 | From: California | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Lizzy
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lizzy   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Kersten:
This child looks like (s)he suffers from HI, like the caption says. Could the child actually be living?

in this earlier post, I meant to paste this link: http://www.ogrish.com/archives/child_with_harlequin_disease_Mar_06_2006.html

--------------------
"Do you see me now? I'm like a fireball . . . with these shoulder pads I have the strength to destroy villages, homes and crops. GEM SWEATER!"

Posts: 72 | From: Dayton, OH | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
  This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post new topic  Post a reply Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2