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Author Topic: Study: Kids with high IQs grow up to be vegetarians
Jonny T
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What Lainie said.

Vegan - no animal products whatsoever, including leather, milk, eggs, etc.

Vegetarian - nothing dead

Fish, chicken, or anything else? You have whatever tastes you have, don't try and put a particular label on it, or at least not one that causes hassle for those who are vegetarians.

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Lainie
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For the record, I don't ask for or require any special dishes when others fix meals. I grew up eating just the sides (assuming they're really vegetarian), salad and bread at my mother's dinner table, and that still works just fine for me. Surely someone who doesn't eat red meat could do the same?

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El Camino
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I'm not surprised there would be a correlation between high IQ and vegetarianism, but I can't imagine it being a direct causation thing. There are several reasons why this might be. Children with high IQs are more likely to go to college, and (at least in the US, I know this is a British study) colleges tend to be more liberal places, where things like vegetarianism are common and encouraged. Also, probably people with higher IQs have higher incomes (on average, I know a lot of smart people are in dire straits financially and a lot of dumb ones strike it righ), and higher income gives you greater choice in your food habits, so wealthier people are more likely to be able to easily afford trying new things, and might try vegetarianism and stick with it. Also, as suggested in the article, people with higher IQs may be more interested in their long term health, and take steps to improve it. Vegetarianism may be one of those common steps (although I, personally, think a diet with moderate amounts of chicken and fish and small amounts of beef is probably healthier than a vegetarian diet. Alas, many people (myself included) have a hard time eating the proper amount, and American culture expecially encourages large portions. Ah well.)
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snapdragonfly
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quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
quote:
Originally posted by snapdragonfly:
My cousin's husband is a vegan, and she is vegetarian, and he always refers to himself as a vegan so people will know he does not eat dairy or eggs. She will eat dairy or eggs and quite likes to, so she refers to herself as a vegetarian so that people will know, when they are inviting them over, that they can in fact serve her cheese or eggs.

I think that it's more considerate to be very specific about exactly what sort of vege-whatever you are if people are going to be trying to feed you. ~ if not, I guess it doesn't matter much except for clarity's sake.

I've always considered my dietary habits to by my own problem. I'm rarely, if ever, in a situatin where the host doesn't already know me well enough though. Regardless, I would never expect someone to make different food on my behalf.
And that's considerate of you, but us foodies like any excuse to try out new recipes and like to spoil our guests, be they vegan, vegetarian, or omnivore. I can't abide the thought anyone should leave my table unfulfilled.

~my sil-equivalent doesn't ASK for special treatment either, but she's about as big as a popcorn fart and is one of those birdy people who needs to eat often or she gets weak and headachy. She is a paralegal and is often out of town, in legal meetings for 16 hours a day, for days on end...and the only food available is something catered, and the only non meat items available to her are iceburg lettuce and white rolls...I guess she carries nuts and cheese or something cause I don't see how she doesn't starve.

I make sure there is always something hearty and meatless at every meal when she visits.

--------------------
"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

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snapdragonfly
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quote:
Originally posted by Nick Theodorakis:
quote:
Originally posted by snapdragonfly:
...

eta My sil-equivalent's summation of her vegetarianism is that she doesn't "eat anything with a face." [Big Grin]

Are echinoderms (e.g., sea urchins) ok, then? How about clams? Not trying to be snarky, just clarifying if she (or anyone else using that phrase, which I've heard used before but never explained) is being literal or if it's just a catch-phrase.

Nick

Well, in her case, she doesn't eat those either.

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"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

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Zorro
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waffles

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Zorro
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quote:
Originally posted by Jonny T:
quote:
Out of myself, my brother, and my sister, the one with the lowest IQ (sister, and it isn't even *that* low) is the only vegetarian.

Me and my 129 IQ enjoyed a huge Fuddruckers burger last night. [Smile]

Spoonerisms and sleep deprivation don't work well together.

Jona "what the NFBSK is a 'rudd' anyway?" than

Fuddruckers is a chain of mostly hamburger-oriented restaurants. Their burgers are made to order and pretty darn big. [Smile]

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Elkhound
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quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by snapdragonfly:
[qb] I've always considered my dietary habits to by my own problem. I'm rarely, if ever, in a situatin where the host doesn't already know me well enough though. Regardless, I would never expect someone to make different food on my behalf.

A good guest eats what is placed before him/her and is thankful. However, a good host(ess) wants to make his/her guest happy and comfortable. Hence, ascertaining one's guests' special dietary needs/preferences when one is planning the meal is something a good host should do, and if asked a prospective guest should give as detailed an answer as s/he can.

In my case, I'm a Type II diabetic controlling it with a low-carb diet. Hence, if someone is having me over to dinner and asks what I can eat, I'll say, "Nothing sweet, starchy, or deep-fried, please," and that will generally be enough. (Now, as most vegetarian dishes are pretty high in starch, from the vegetarian cookbooks I've read, if one of my fellow-guests were vegetarian, I don't know what my host would do.)

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snapdragonfly
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quote:
Originally posted by Elkhound:
quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by snapdragonfly:
[qb] I've always considered my dietary habits to by my own problem. I'm rarely, if ever, in a situatin where the host doesn't already know me well enough though. Regardless, I would never expect someone to make different food on my behalf.

A good guest eats what is placed before him/her and is thankful. However, a good host(ess) wants to make his/her guest happy and comfortable. Hence, ascertaining one's guests' special dietary needs/preferences when one is planning the meal is something a good host should do, and if asked a prospective guest should give as detailed an answer as s/he can.

In my case, I'm a Type II diabetic controlling it with a low-carb diet. Hence, if someone is having me over to dinner and asks what I can eat, I'll say, "Nothing sweet, starchy, or deep-fried, please," and that will generally be enough. (Now, as most vegetarian dishes are pretty high in starch, from the vegetarian cookbooks I've read, if one of my fellow-guests were vegetarian, I don't know what my host would do.)

Hah. I could come up with a menu for you both and everyone else would like it too.

snap-"Martha Stewart got nuthin' on me"- dragonfly

eta ~ my mom, SIL equivalent, and I, spent two weeks emailing each other about the meals and menus for our upcoming visit...because we LIKE to do this sort of thing...it's not everyone's cup of tea, I suppose.

--------------------
"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

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Rhiandmoi
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I am sorry, but a good guest does not eat what is put if front of them it that would violate their personal beliefs or cause them extreme physical distress. A good guest politely informs the host that they have special needs and either has brought their own food or doesn't eat (because arrangements weren't made ahead of time). I don't see anything polite about choking down some food I shouldn't be eating only to have to lock my self in the bathroom for an hour after dinner.

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snapdragonfly
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What my SIL does (when she's around people other than family) is just eats what she can eat from the choices available, without remark, and fills up on something else later.

Though, as I said, working for a week in all day and half the night meetings with only the food someone else provides for you, out of town in a motel with no car, makes it hard to come up with your own supplements and it's hard to work your butt off when you can't eat properly. In a case like that - where she is not a guest, but a worker, and a valuable one too - I think she ought to say something. It's really not hard to find good veggie alternatives, I think most people just don't understand that vegetarian does not equal regular meals minus the meat.

I don't understand why anyone would bother having people over to eat if they didn't enjoy catering to their needs, myself, but as I said I live to do that. I love to entertain.

--------------------
"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

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Mistletoey Chloe
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quote:
Originally posted by Elkhound:
A good guest eats what is placed before him/her and is thankful.

Oh dear. If principles about what one eats make one a bad guest, I guess orthodox Jews and Moslems are obliged to eat pork. And people on diets have to have dessert. And allergic people have to have the shellfish, even if their tongues swell up to the size of barrage balloons.

It's ridiculous to suggest that not eating something makes one a bad guest. I can see that *requiring* something else might make one demanding, but it's easy enough to demur and eat later.

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BeachLife
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quote:
Originally posted by Mistletoey Chloe:
quote:
Originally posted by Elkhound:
A good guest eats what is placed before him/her and is thankful.

Oh dear. If principles about what one eats make one a bad guest, I guess orthodox Jews and Moslems are obliged to eat pork. And people on diets have to have dessert. And allergic people have to have the shellfish, even if their tongues swell up to the size of barrage balloons.

It's ridiculous to suggest that not eating something makes one a bad guest. I can see that *requiring* something else might make one demanding, but it's easy enough to demur and eat later.

I entirely agree. A guest is not required to eat what ever is served to be polite. I think any host would be horrified to see a guest gaging over their food.

At the same time, a guest should be as polite as possible in the refusal. Even making a less than accurate excuse for not eating.

Beach...the best refusal is the unseen refusal...Life!

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DaGuyWitBluGlasses
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Vegetarinaism is not based only on empathy:

Sometimes its jsut smart resource management:

-Grow the Food, to feed the animals, who only use a small percentage of that to grow themselves.
-Or just grow the food, and feed the people.

The latter takes up much less farm land and other resources.

Farmed Chicken and Fish put a much higher percentage of food into body mass, so are much more efficient than mammalian farm animals like pigs and cows.

As well, fish in the wild don't need their food grown for them

But people should realize what they're personal beliefs are about:

you're not going to go out and buy food that is going to go against your principles, you're not going to contribute to the demand for Steak or Pork. But you are not saving any animals, or managing resources better by refusing what you're served. It's already been used, throwing it out is not going to be any better than eating it.

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Mistletoey Chloe
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That's true (or mostly true; one might argue that a host or hostess left with a lot of meat products might buy fewer next time), but also, lots of vegetarians find the idea of meat-eating abhorrent. So maybe it won't save a chicken if I don't tuck into a chicken wing, say, that has already been prepared for me, but I'd still have to deal with having chunks of a dead body in my mouth.

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tagurit
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Special needs. Hmmmm... I've been playing the game wrong, all along.

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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses:
You're not going to go out and buy food that is going to go against your principles, you're not going to contribute to the demand for Steak or Pork. But you are not saving any animals, or managing resources better by refusing what you're served. It's already been used, throwing it out is not going to be any better than eating it.

What Chloe said, plus, I haven't eaten meat, chicken or fish in at least 14 years. I strongly suspect that even if I could choke it down without gagging, it would make me very, very sick. Throwing it out would be better than that outcome.

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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by tagurit:
Special needs. Hmmmm... I've been playing the game wrong, all along.

Huh?

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DaGuyWitBluGlasses
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quote:
Originally posted by Mistletoey Chloe:
but I'd still have to deal with having chunks of a dead body in my mouth.

Emotional suffering to you, i would think, is more than just a personal belief.
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FullMetal
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I think the only connection that they can honestly make by this study is that people with a high IQ as a child are more apt to make an informed decision about their diet.

for some of them it's a vegetarian, some vegan, some full blown carnivores. whereas the other people of average/low intelligence, don't really put much thought into what they put in their mouths. this is an assumption of course, but something I would see as fitting the data. and the fact of the higher intelligence generally means more thought put into everything done. less things are done, "just because".

that being said, it could just be a statistical anomoly.
[Razz]

I'm unfortunately unable to live on a vegetarian diet. I've tried, I don't get enough of something, and I turn into a real bear if I eat a vegetarian diet. but it's also a taste bud preference. I like the taste of meat, and i don't see any moral concerns with it, Per se. I know we screwed up a long time ago, and bred cattle to be useless in the wild. and to stop cattle farms, would pretty much be the end of the species...

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El Camino
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quote:
Originally posted by Mistletoey Chloe:
quote:
Originally posted by Elkhound:
A good guest eats what is placed before him/her and is thankful.

Oh dear. If principles about what one eats make one a bad guest, I guess orthodox Jews and Moslems are obliged to eat pork. And people on diets have to have dessert. And allergic people have to have the shellfish, even if their tongues swell up to the size of barrage balloons.

It's ridiculous to suggest that not eating something makes one a bad guest. I can see that *requiring* something else might make one demanding, but it's easy enough to demur and eat later.

This may or may not be close to what Elkhound meant, but I would amend his statement to something like: A good guest eats what is placed before him/her, or not, but is thankful and gracious regardless.
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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses:
quote:
Originally posted by Mistletoey Chloe:
but I'd still have to deal with having chunks of a dead body in my mouth.

Emotional suffering to you, i would think, is more than just a personal belief.
I'm really not sure what that means -- perhaps you meant "more important than just a personal belief" -- but as my post above explained, the potential suffering is physical as well as personal.

And really, it's a bit insulting to suggest that vegetarians make the choices they do because they don't understand their own reasons for being vegetarian. I'm quite sure I understand my reasons for that choice better than you do.

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DaGuyWitBluGlasses
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quote:
Originally posted by Lainie:
QUOTE]
And really, it's a bit insulting to suggest that vegetarians make the choices they do because they don't understand their own reasons for being vegetarian. I'm quite sure I understand my reasons for that choice better than you do.

By 'realize' i didn't mean not "knowing" but rather not being "aware":

I know how to step with my left foot, and then with my right foot to walk (or vice versa). However, i'm usually never "aware" of what i'm doing, i jsut decide on where i want to go, and my body does the rest. I have no idea how many steps it took me to get there, which step i took first.

I had to do be aware of that once upon a time, to learn how to walk in the first place, but once i got that figured out i didn't have to think about it any more.

Deciding to be a vegetarian is not something i would assume people do everytime they sit down and eat. Its a decision that's made in advance and stuck with. Thus, not something that a person needs to be "aware" of.

I'm saying that it should be, that the decision should be made at other times as well (if its only for personal belief reasons and not for physical/emotional harm to one's self)

quote:

I'm really not sure what that means -- perhaps you meant "more important than just a personal belief" -- but as my post above explained, the potential suffering is physical as well as personal.

yes, "more important" you can't be forced to harm yourself.
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Errata
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quote:
Originally posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses:
you're not going to go out and buy food that is going to go against your principles, you're not going to contribute to the demand for Steak or Pork. But you are not saving any animals, or managing resources better by refusing what you're served. It's already been used, throwing it out is not going to be any better than eating it.

If thats what you believe (and for most vegetarians its not their sole reason) then it still absolutely makes sense to refuse it. A good host shouldn't be cooking meat for a vegetarian (and its not like this is something a vegetarian guest will keep as a surprise). Someone hosting a big party is generally aware of that and will provide vegetarian options for their vegetarian guests. If people behaved like you suggest, then hosts might not bother with the vegetarian option and guilt trip their guests into eating meat. The culture of vegetarians not eating meat even if its prepared results in less meat being prepared overall.
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Salamander
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I'm the village idiot and I loves my meats!!

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DaGuyWitBluGlasses
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quote:
Originally posted by Errata:
If thats what you believe (and for most vegetarians its not their sole reason) then it still absolutely makes sense to refuse it. A good host shouldn't be cooking meat for a vegetarian (and its not like this is something a vegetarian guest will keep as a surprise). Someone hosting a big party is generally aware of that and will provide vegetarian options for their vegetarian guests. If people behaved like you suggest, then hosts might not bother with the vegetarian option and guilt trip their guests into eating meat. The culture of vegetarians not eating meat even if its prepared results in less meat being prepared overall.

first:
the meat is already bought before you refuse it. There is no reason to assume that it will lessen the demand by more thorugh not eating it than by letting the hosts know your preferences afterwards: that you would appreciate not being served meat again.

Letting people know you don't (want) to eat meat, and not preparing meat yourself is what causes less meat to be used. Refusing to eat already prepared meat does not.

Second:
having to prepare you something else instead after you refuse what already prepared consume more resources

Thirdly:
Your opinion is to affect your own purchasing habits. It's taking your personal belief too far to be assuming that you can have an impact on your hosts choices.

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Ganzfeld
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I don't think anyone should have to eat anything a host prepares just to be polite. A good host may not know all the tastes and diets of his guests but surely he won't be offended to find that they differ from what he has prepared. I'd much rather a vegetarian at my house simply tell me that he won't eat it rather than pretending he doesn't mind. Personally, I eat just about anything and everything prepared for me but when I'm full I don't pretend I can eat more just because the host has overestimated my ability to eat.

There are other considerations besides just not eating meat in protest. People who don't eat meat don't digest it very well and, frankly, I'd rather not make my guests ill (any more than I already do by playing the guitar and singing for them after their meal).

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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses:
quote:
Originally posted by Errata:
If thats what you believe (and for most vegetarians its not their sole reason) then it still absolutely makes sense to refuse it. A good host shouldn't be cooking meat for a vegetarian (and its not like this is something a vegetarian guest will keep as a surprise). Someone hosting a big party is generally aware of that and will provide vegetarian options for their vegetarian guests. If people behaved like you suggest, then hosts might not bother with the vegetarian option and guilt trip their guests into eating meat. The culture of vegetarians not eating meat even if its prepared results in less meat being prepared overall.

first:
the meat is already bought before you refuse it. There is no reason to assume that it will lessen the demand by more thorugh not eating it than by letting the hosts know your preferences afterwards: that you would appreciate not being served meat again.

If one of my guests came up to me after the meal and explained that although they had eaten Item X, it was something they normally would never eat and would I please not serve it to them again, I would be horrified to hear that they put themselves through such an uncomfortable and unnecessary ordeal for my sake.

And in your example, the meat would still have gone to waste, since it could have been eaten by someone who appreciated it -- the host, for example, for lunch the next day.

quote:
Letting people know you don't (want) to eat meat, and not preparing meat yourself is what causes less meat to be used. Refusing to eat already prepared meat does not.
One more time: Wanting less meat to be used is not the only reason people become vegetarian.

quote:
Second:
having to prepare you something else instead after you refuse what already prepared consume more resources

Who said anything about asking them to prepare something else after the meal was already prepared? The options are to refuse the meat when it's served, or to have something else prepared ahead of time.

quote:
Thirdly:
Your opinion is to affect your own purchasing habits. It's taking your personal belief too far to be assuming that you can have an impact on your hosts choices.

No it isn't. If Joe and Sally know in advance that Lainie won't eat meat when they invite her over, they will buy one steak less. If they serve steak once and she says, "No thank you, I don't eat meat," they will find another use for that steak (serve it to another guest, eat it as leftovers). The next time they invite Lainie over as part of a dinner party, they may purchase one less serving of meat (or they may choose to serve or eat the extra instead).

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How homophobic do you have to be to have penguin gaydar? - Lewis Black

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snapdragonfly
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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This article on MSN.com about hosting the holidays says to find out about any guests dietary needs or preferences, such as vegetarian or allergies or diabetes, and provide for that.

"There’s no need to cater to everyone’s likes and dislikes (that would be more work than you can image) but it’s the sign of a good hostess to inquire about the dietary needs of your guests. Find out if anyone is a vegetarian, lactose intolerant, has food allergies, is diabetic or kosher and so on."

Not that I didn't think so already, nor have I ever in fact witnessed a host/hostess who wasn't happy to oblige company. I have seen some people who were just clueless about how to feed a veggie, though. Like my stepmom. She just doesn't understand the concept that well.

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"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

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Mosherette
Deck the Malls


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quote:
Originally posted by Jonny T:
Jona "what the NFBSK is a 'rudd' anyway?" than



Latin name Scardinius erythrophthalmus.

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Silence should never under any circumstances be construed as agreement. A lot of the time, it's simply a reflection that someone just said something so stupid that no response could possibly do it justice. - Ramblin' Dave

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tagurit
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by Lainie:
quote:
Originally posted by tagurit:
Special needs. Hmmmm... I've been playing the game wrong, all along.

Huh?
Oh, sorry. I don't mean to downplay those with specific needs. It just occurred to me that perhaps I haven't had to put myself through the torture of eating foods at people's houses that I could barely force myself to swallow, all these years. After all, I don't have any allergies, but I do have special needs. It must be [what I term] edible.

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Explore, enjoy and protect the planet
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AAMAH

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Lainie
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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Oh, I see now. I'm not sure what the etiquette is if the host just happens to be a hideously bad cook -- make polite excuses, maybe?

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How homophobic do you have to be to have penguin gaydar? - Lewis Black

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DaGuyWitBluGlasses
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by Lainie:
The meat is already bought before you refuse it. There is no reason to assume that it will lessen the demand by more thorugh not eating it than by letting the hosts know your preferences afterwards: that you would appreciate not being served meat again. [/qb]If one of my guests came up to me after the meal and explained that although they had eaten Item X, it was something they normally would never eat and would I please not serve it to them again, I would be horrified to hear that they put themselves through such an uncomfortable and unnecessary ordeal for my sake.

Some people don't want Fish to be served on the same plate as land grown dishes... some people might prefer there fork to be served on the right.

The host should try to accomadate all those, but there's no reason to be horrified for not accomadating an Opinion taht you weren't aware of, or were to stressed about. People need to know their opinions have limits, and that person coming to you is not expressing disgust, but rather maturity in acknowledging that it his personal Opinion, on what to eat, and not based on any emotional or physical reason.

quote:

And in your example, the meat would still have gone to waste, since it could have been eaten by someone who appreciated it -- the host, for example, for lunch the next day.

Maybe, maybe not, not everything refrigerates well, fish in particular, or very-rare dishes will go to waste.

And properly cooked meat has its limits as well, there might have already been plans for leftovers, and the extra meat would be over the top of what the host could use.

Or the host might refuse to keep something that has been served to somebody else.

quote:
Who said anything about asking them to prepare something else after the meal was already prepared? The options are to refuse the meat when it's served, or to have something else prepared ahead of time.

Think about this one, please, assume you just ogt their if you must.


No it isn't. If Joe and Sally know in advance that Lainie won't eat meat when they invite her over, they will buy one steak less.
[/quote]

I already said this:
refusing to eat meat once its been served does not in any way affect what they are going to buy more. Your refusal to eat meat once its been served is not letting them know in advance.

quote:

If they serve steak once and she says, "No thank you, I don't eat meat," they will find another use for that steak (serve it to another guest, eat it as leftovers).
The next time they invite Lainie over as part of a dinner party, they may purchase one less serving of meat (or they may choose to serve or eat the extra instead). [/QB]

And mentioning afterwards taht you won't eat meat will achieve the exact same effect.

Refusing to eat meat once its been served achieves nothing.

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Lainie
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses:
quote:
Originally posted by Lainie:
The meat is already bought before you refuse it. There is no reason to assume that it will lessen the demand by more thorugh not eating it than by letting the hosts know your preferences afterwards: that you would appreciate not being served meat again.
If one of my guests came up to me after the meal and explained that although they had eaten Item X, it was something they normally would never eat and would I please not serve it to them again, I would be horrified to hear that they put themselves through such an uncomfortable and unnecessary ordeal for my sake.

Some people don't want Fish to be served on the same plate as land grown dishes... some people might prefer there fork to be served on the right.[/qb]
First, please be careful how you use the quote feature, so that you do not attribute your own words to other people, as you have done above.

quote:
The host should try to accomadate all those, but there's no reason to be horrified for not accomadating an Opinion taht you weren't aware of, or were to stressed about.
I'll choose what I'm horrified, about, thank you.

quote:
People need to know their opinions have limits, and that person coming to you is not expressing disgust, but rather maturity in acknowledging that it his personal Opinion, on what to eat, and not based on any emotional or physical reason.
I don't agree that eating food you find it repellent to eat is the mature option. I believe that the mature option would be to inform one's host in advance, or say "No thank you."

quote:
Your refusal to eat meat once its been served is not letting them know in advance.

No one ever said it was.

quote:
And mentioning afterwards taht you won't eat meat will achieve the exact same effect.
Without my having eaten something that is repugnant to me and will make me ill.

quote:
Refusing to eat meat once its been served achieves nothing.
Except not to make me physically ill. [Roll Eyes]

I would not sit silently while my host puts meat on my plate, then refuse to eat it. I would say, "No meat for me, please, I am a vegetarian."

If I were to attend a meal where I had reason to believe that the food would be plated in advance, I would make it known that I am a vegetarian. If that were not possible, or if, after I have made my dietary needs known, the host insists on putting meat on my plate, I will not eat it. There is no reason to do so, and several very good reasons not to.

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How homophobic do you have to be to have penguin gaydar? - Lewis Black

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Ganzfeld
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by DaGuyWitBluGlasses:
Refusing to eat meat once its been served achieves nothing.

Oh, good. You haven't even touched your long pork so I was a little worried you weren't going to eat it. Bon appetite!
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