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Cervus
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by Eddylizard:
quote:
There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, purple and silver.


According to my rhyming dictionary:

Orange : Binge, dinge, hinge, cringe, fringe, springe (a small snare), singe, tinge, whinge, swinge, twinge, unhinge, challenge, impinge, syringe, infringe, scavenge and lozenge.

Those words all end in an "inge" sound. Orange ends in an "ornj" sound.

I guess it depends on your pronounciation of the word orange.

P.S. What is "whinge"? I thought it was a strange British spelling of "whine".

--------------------
"There is no constitutional right to sleep with endangered reptiles." -- Carl Hiaasen
Won't somebody please think of the adults!

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evilrabbit
Jingle Bell Hock


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quote:
Originally posted by Cervus nippon:
quote:
Originally posted by Eddylizard:
quote:
There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, purple and silver.


According to my rhyming dictionary:

Orange : Binge, dinge, hinge, cringe, fringe, springe (a small snare), singe, tinge, whinge, swinge, twinge, unhinge, challenge, impinge, syringe, infringe, scavenge and lozenge.

Those words all end in an "inge" sound. Orange ends in an "ornj" sound.

I guess it depends on your pronounciation of the word orange.

P.S. What is "whinge"? I thought it was a strange British spelling of "whine".

I believe it is, in fact, a strange British word for whine.

--------------------
"My sandwich choice is uncertain, until I actually order. It's like Schrodinger's Sandwich."
"Is plutonium involved in this sandwich in any way?"
"Maybe."

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NeeCD
Happy Holly Days


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There was a thread about whinging a year ago (although I believe it turned into a general British English/American English thread after just a few posts).
Here is a cached page 1 of the thread.

As for orange, I could see it pronounced or-inge if it was absolutely necessary to rhyme it with those other words, but it's still a bit of a stretch, IMO.

We already know that "purple" rhymes with "nurple", of course [Razz] .

--------------------
I wondered why the Frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
What does "Bookachow", "YOMANK!" and other lingo mean?

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Em
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by NeeCD:
There was a thread about whinging a year ago (although I believe it turned into a general British English/American English thread after just a few posts).

Ahh, the memories... my first snopes semi-trainwreck. [lol]

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What the NFBSK does YOMANK mean?

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atimnie
I Saw Three Shipments


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Well, by that standard, silver would rhyme with her, stir, cur, and dozens of other words. A more exact rhyme for orange would be door hinge, mentioned before, I think. As for silver, kill her pretty much rhymes, as does hill cur, Bill Burr (wonder if there's a real person with that name), will stir...

And purple rhymes with... um... I'll get back to you on that.

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KingDavid8
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by NeeCD:

We already know that "purple" rhymes with "nurple", of course [Razz] .

It does rhyme with hirple, though it isn't in most dictionaries.

David

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KingDavid8
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Oh, yeah, I found a page on Wikipedia that lists English words that don't have rhymes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_without_rhymes

It lists:
Angst
Breadth
Bulb (except they do mention the word "culb" - a retort)
Depth
Film
Glimpsed
Gulf
Month (except they do mention "millionth", "billionth" and "n+1th" - pronounced "en plus oneth")
Mulcts
Pint
Ninth
Sculpts
Sixth
Twelfth (though depending on how you pronounce it, it could rhyme with "stealth")
Width
Wolf
Warmth
Angry
Monster
Chimney
Luggage
Orange
Pizza
Purple
Reptile
Rhythm
Silver

David

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NeeCD
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by KingDavid8:
quote:
Originally posted by NeeCD:

We already know that "purple" rhymes with "nurple", of course [Razz] .

It does rhyme with hirple, though it isn't in most dictionaries.

David

It's in the OED, from what I understand, as is the word curple, which is a horse's rear end. [lol]

et delete a redundant non-rhyme - it's in the post above.

--------------------
I wondered why the Frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
What does "Bookachow", "YOMANK!" and other lingo mean?

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kallrynne
I Saw Three Shipments


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quote:
Chocolate kills dogs. Chocolate affects a dog's heart and nervous system. A few ounces is enough to kill a small sized dog.
Chocolate is definitely bad for dogs. It CAN kill dogs, so the first part of this is true. But it depends on the kind of chocolate. Milk chocolate is not as bad as baking chocolate. At the vet I've seen lots of chocolate cases. I've seen a medium sized dog come in for eating an entire bag of hershey's kisses and just have an upset stomach (but then, so would I after an entire bag). Tylenol kills more dogs than chocolate (at least in my experience). So Tylenol and BAKING chocolate bad! Milk chocolate, not GOOD but not necessarily a death sentence either.
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kallrynne
I Saw Three Shipments


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And as far as the Ben Hur scene, movemistakes.com has this to say:

In the big chariot race scene, a red Austin Mini can be seen through the arcs in the back of the coliseum. [Famous urban myth, and just plain made up.]

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skeptic
Deck the Malls


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quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
quote:
Playing cards were issued to British pilots in WWII. If captured, they could be soaked in water and unfolded to reveal a map for escape.

How does that work? British intelligence had to be pretty good to know exactly where their pilots would be taken if captured. And why weren't the pilots just briefed on this information so that the map not be found by the guards?

Beach...I'm sure somewhere this is Hollywood's fault...Life!

Why hide a map????. It's not like the Germans didn't know the layout of Germany. I know that pilots had a map printed on cloth, but this was more of a convenience that it wouldn't get damaged if wet or crumpled.

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BringTheNoise
Xboxing Day


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quote:
Originally posted by Eddylizard:
quote:
Originally posted by TB Tabby:
quote:
Originally posted by Kel:

During the chariot scene in "Ben Hur", a small red car can be seen in the distance.


Isn't Ben Hur in black & white?
Nope Ben Hur is in Technicolor

http://imdb.com/title/tt0052618/

Having said that I've scoured the scene for the car and I'm damned if I can see it.

The 1925 version was in black and white though: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0016641/

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Joe Bentley
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Money isn't made out of paper. It's made out of cotton.
Sort of. Although the exact composition of the paper used to print money is classified, it's known to be made out of a type of paper which contains cotton and linen for strength. Real "paper" money wouldn't be durable enough.

quote:
The 57 on the Heinz ketchup bottle represents the number of varieties of pickle the company once had.
False

quote:
The Declaration of Independence was written on hemp paper.
No. The United States Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights were all printed on parchment, tanned hides of sheep or cows.

quote:
A female ferret will die if it goes into heat and cannot find a mate.
True. A female ferret has a strong chance of dieing of anemia if she goes into heat and does not mate.

quote:
The "spot" on the 7-Up comes from its inventor who had red eyes. He was an albino.
7-Up was invented in 1929 by Charles Leiper Grigg. who was not an albino.

--------------------
"Existence has no pattern save what we imagine after staring at it for too long." - Rorschach, The Watchmen

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kappants
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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Well I just brought my newborne baby home last week and it is pretty hard to have a mistaken identity, at least in California. It is law that before the baby leaves the delivery room that baby and parents have ID bands placed on them. In fact the baby has two ID bands, one hospital band and a anti-theft device cover all four extremities. Now I could see the number of mistaken id going up if babies are born in low cost clinics or in states with little or no prevenative measures.

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Rehcsif
We Three Blings


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When we had our first 2 years ago, I was initially reasurred with the "anti theft band" on Rehcsif Jr.'s leg. I was less impressed, when it was time for us to leave, when it was removed with a standard office scissors. Can anyone say "false sense of security"?

As for the ID bracelet, Jr's kept falling off his leg, so it could have been easilly removed, or worse, misplaced long enough for a mix-up to happen. But he was with us almost constantly (other than the circumcision, I believe at least one of us was with him the whole stay) and you quickly learn which one is 'yours'...

-Tim

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sidewinder
Deck the Malls


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quote:
In Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift described the two moons of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, giving their exact size and speeds of rotation. He did this more than 100 years before either moon was discovered.

can anyone debunk or clarify this one for me? interested me.
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Nick Theodorakis
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by sidewinder:
quote:
In Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift described the two moons of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, giving their exact size and speeds of rotation. He did this more than 100 years before either moon was discovered.

can anyone debunk or clarify this one for me? interested me.
quote:

This Load-stone is under the Care of certain Astronomers, who from Time to Time give it such Positions as the Monarch directs. They spend the greatest Part of their Lives in observing the celestial Bodies, which they do by the Assistance of Glasses, far excelling ours in Goodness. For, although their largest Telescopes do not exceed three Feet, they magnify much more than those of a Hundred with us, and shew the Stars with greater Clearness. This Advantage hath enabled them to extend their Discoveries much farther than our Astronomers in Europe. They have made a Catalogue of ten Thousand fixed Stars, whereas the largest of ours do not contain above one third Part of that Number. They have likewise discovered two lesser Stars, or Satellites, which revolve about Mars; whereof the innermost is distant from the Center of the primary Planet exactly three of his Diameters, and the outermost five; the former revolves in the space of ten Hours, and the latter in Twenty-one and an Half; so that the Squares of their periodical Times, are very near in the same Proportion with the Cubes of their Distance from the Center of Mars; which evidently shews them to be governed by the same Law of Gravitation, that influences the other heavenly Bodies.

Etext avaliable here as one long text file, from Project Gutenberg.

Gulliver's Travels was pulished in 1726. Phobos and Deimos were discovered in 1877.

Phobos has an orbital period between 7 and 8 hours, and Deimos a little over 30 hours; however, their distance to Mars is closer than Swift envisioned.

I just noticed that the Wikipedia article for Phobos mentions the coincidence.

Nick

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Jason Threadslayer
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by skeptic:
quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
quote:
Playing cards were issued to British pilots in WWII. If captured, they could be soaked in water and unfolded to reveal a map for escape.
How does that work? British intelligence had to be pretty good to know exactly where their pilots would be taken if captured. And why weren't the pilots just briefed on this information so that the map not be found by the guards?

Beach...I'm sure somewhere this is Hollywood's fault...Life!

Why hide a map????. It's not like the Germans didn't know the layout of Germany. I know that pilots had a map printed on cloth, but this was more of a convenience that it wouldn't get damaged if wet or crumpled.
The OP's claim is a bit off -- surprisingly, the cards were actually sent to American not British servicemen.

From United States Playing Cards Company history (manufacturer of Aviator, Bee, Bicycle, Hoyle, and Maverick playing cards):

quote:
During World War II, the company secretly worked with the U. S. government in fabricating special decks to send as gifts for American prisoners of war in German camps. When these cards were moistened, they peeled apart to reveal sections of a map indicating precise escape routes.
The card pieces formed a mosiac map of Germany (from US Library of Congress Preservation information, playing card map information about 3/4 the way down the page).

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Turing test failures: 6

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Illuminatus
Jingle Bell Hock


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quote:
315 entries in Webster's 1996 dictionary were misspelled.
But Webster's is practically the official book of the English language. Wouldn't that mean that YOU were spelling them incorrectly?

[fish]

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htonl
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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quote:
Originally posted by Illuminatus:
quote:
315 entries in Webster's 1996 dictionary were misspelled.
But Webster's is practically the official book of the English language. Wouldn't that mean that YOU were spelling them incorrectly?

[fish]

Webster's? Pah! We all know the OED is the One True Dictionary, now, don't we? [Razz]

--------------------
Part of the Secular Humanist Conspiracy™ since 1997.

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