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Author Topic: Be Careful Who You Tip
J Caldwell
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by frogpond:
My sister worked as a waitress at Steak'n'Shake for many years. She always said it was the blue collar workers that tipped the most. The well-to-do were much more likely to be miserly with their tips. (Perhaps that's how they came to be well-to-do?) My brother-in-law who delivers pizzas reports the same thing. Those who live in the big expensive houses tip the least. Maybe the swanky waiters don't receive as much in tips as you might think since they usually serve the richer population.

From my experience in delivering pizzas, how much someone tipped (or if they did) could not be pre-determined based on who/where you were delivering. I once got a tip that was a little more than the pizzas cost from someone that was in a "white collar" neigborhood, but there were a good number of houses in this same neighborhood that did not ever tip. College students were also unpredictiable. Some tipped well, but others would tip small amounts or not at all. I do think that people that have worked for tips in the past are slightly more generous when it comes to tipping. Also, someone may be more inclined to tip 20-25% on a $20-$30 tab for a dinner for two whereas they may only tip 10-20% on a $60-$100 tab for a dinner for two.
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Methuselah
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by foxbitca:
As someone who's waited tables and known several career waitresses, I'll tell you why-- blue-collar workers are more likely to know how important tips are to the server.

As someone who tips, I'll tell you why...it has nothing to do with not understanding "how important" the tips are to the server, it has to do with the level of service provided.

At a higher class restaurant, I simply receive more and better service than I do at a TGI Fridays (for example). At a higher caliber of restaurant I rarely, if ever, have to look around to summon the server for anything. They are aware of me and inquire about attending to any needs before I have to seek them out. The servers typically provide more services, such as sweeping crrumbs from the table in between courses, providing in-depth knowledge of the food on the menu as well as the wines or other beverages, serve the courses with proper timeliness (bringing the second course after the first course is finished), cater to special requests, typically provide table-side preparation of various dishes (caesar salads, banans foster, etc), arrange to have your car brought around as the check is being taken care of, so on and so forth. The server has the understanding that a gratuity should be based on the level of service provided and overall dining experience.

At a standard, greasy-spoon-type, short-order restaurant, the server brings the food, refills the beverages, provides the check, and cleans the table (sometimes) when the meal is done.

It's simply a different level of service. And, a good server understands that better than average service is what begets better than average tips.

Far too often I've encountered a sense of entitlement in waitstaff at short-order restaurants. A tip is earned. It is not mandatory. If I have a problem with my meal, and I have to spend time seeking out my server, that will affect the tip. If I order an appetizer, and it is delivered at roughly the same time as the entree, that will affect the tip.

It doesn't matter to me one bit how much you need the tip. It matters to me how much effort you put in to doing your job properly, and providing service that makes the dining experience enjoyable. It has nothing to do with being born with a "silver spoon". It has to do with understanding the difference between service and good service.

This, of course, is my opinion based on my own experiences. YMMV.

meth "oh yeah, and I served my time in the greasy-spoon industry, as well" uselah

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Nick Theodorakis
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by ThistleS:
quote:
Originally posted by WildaBeast:
You're supposed to tip the maid when you stay in a hotel? Apparently I've been a cheepskate every time I've stayed in one.

Is tipping only expected in really fancy hotels, or everywhere? I usually don't stay anywhere fancier than Comfort Inn.

I assume it's only fancy hotels, where there might be a little more to the maid service than changing the sheets and vaccuuming. I don't know thought, as I also never stay anywhere fancier than Comfort Inn.
I usually stay at the level of Comfort Inn/Best Western/etc. when travelling, and I leave a buck or two per night for the maid; many times, though, it's not picked up, so I assume the practice is not so widespread at that level as to be recognized as a tip.

What I can never figure out is how to tip at buffet-style restaurant, where you get your own food but servers refill your drinks and bus the tables. I usually leave around %10 but never know if that's over- or under-tipping for those places.

Nick

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Gale
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by J Caldwell:
quote:
Originally posted by frogpond:
My sister worked as a waitress at Steak'n'Shake for many years. She always said it was the blue collar workers that tipped the most. The well-to-do were much more likely to be miserly with their tips. (Perhaps that's how they came to be well-to-do?) My brother-in-law who delivers pizzas reports the same thing. Those who live in the big expensive houses tip the least. Maybe the swanky waiters don't receive as much in tips as you might think since they usually serve the richer population.

From my experience in delivering pizzas, how much someone tipped (or if they did) could not be pre-determined based on who/where you were delivering. I once got a tip that was a little more than the pizzas cost from someone that was in a "white collar" neigborhood, but there were a good number of houses in this same neighborhood that did not ever tip. College students were also unpredictiable. Some tipped well, but others would tip small amounts or not at all. I do think that people that have worked for tips in the past are slightly more generous when it comes to tipping. Also, someone may be more inclined to tip 20-25% on a $20-$30 tab for a dinner for two whereas they may only tip 10-20% on a $60-$100 tab for a dinner for two.
but your favorite have to be the people who used to deliver pizza. Now those (I'm one of them) are the people to deliver to. It's a miserable job, hard on your car, when you're not delivering, you're washing dishes and since no one's tipping you to wash dishes, your pay rate decreases, you sometimes have to wear a goofy uniform, and your car smells like burnt cheese most of the time. I'm a generous tipper and the drivers know it. That's why my 30-45 wait time is usually 20-30 minutes.

My own particular delivery experience taught me 4 things:
1. Hospital nurses don't tip at all.
2. Massage parlor women tip great even to girls.
3. Whoever designed Orange Tree Condominiums gave a box of numbers to someone who was apparently unfamiliar with base 10 and said "go number these apartments) 10 is next to 17 and over 43 which is next to 11. Yeah. Piece of cake.
4. Jester Sunday Night Pizza Races blow goats.

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Mistletoey Chloe
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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Maybe it's just personal preference, but I would far rather have the kind of "Want more coffee, hon?" service you get at Waffle House than the obsequious smarming that you get high class restaurants. *shudder* Also, it's a lot easier to get food without meat in it other than the "very special" plate of limp vegetables.

I usually place my hotel tip on a note with a scribbled thanks. That way there's no confusion.

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foxbitca
Mashed Potato Time


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quote:
Originally posted by Methuselah:

Far too often I've encountered a sense of entitlement in waitstaff at short-order restaurants. A tip is earned. It is not mandatory. If I have a problem with my meal, and I have to spend time seeking out my server, that will affect the tip. If I order an appetizer, and it is delivered at roughly the same time as the entree, that will affect the tip.

It doesn't matter to me one bit how much you need the tip. It matters to me how much effort you put in to doing your job properly, and providing service that makes the dining experience enjoyable. It has nothing to do with being born with a "silver spoon". It has to do with understanding the difference between service and good service.

Um. I wasn't implying that tipping was mandatory. I suppose I should have added a footnote that I was assuming that the hypothetical servers I was speaking of had provided good, attentive service.

And just a nitpick-- servers can't really control what the kitchen does. Late appetizers were rarely my fault, and if I disappeared for a few minutes it was often because I was being verbally abused in the kitchen by my boss because he needed somebody to belittle.

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J Caldwell
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by Chloe:
Maybe it's just personal preference, but I would far rather have the kind of "Want more coffee, hon?" service you get at Waffle House than the obsequious smarming that you get high class restaurants. *shudder* Also, it's a lot easier to get food without meat in it other than the "very special" plate of limp vegetables.

You must be going to the wrong "high class" restaurants. I prefer a good restaurant where you have a good choice of foods, including vegetarian choices even though I am more than likely going to get something with meat, and a very competent wait staff. Not to say the "want some more coffee hun?" waitress has its own merit, but the expectation of service there is different.
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Mistletoey Chloe
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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I think I must be. Really, the posher the restaurant suggested (and I'm not going to be in one unless it's a group thing) the more my heart sinks. And this is not *just* because I'm a cheapskate, sine it happens when someone else is paying too.

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~~Ai am in mai prrrrrraime!~~

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Megan'sMom
Deck the Malls


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Maybe it's an east coast thing (since most of my travels have been east coast), but most of the hotels I've stayed in (and we're talking Red Roof Inn or Holiday Inn not Hyatt or Ritz) have had envelopes on the desk or dresser for you to leave a tip for the maids. Even in Podunk PA (read Lancaster), there were envelopes.

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BeachLife
The Bills of St. Mary's


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quote:
Originally posted by foxbitca:
...And just a nitpick-- servers can't really control what the kitchen does. Late appetizers were rarely my fault, and if I disappeared for a few minutes it was often because I was being verbally abused in the kitchen by my boss because he needed somebody to belittle.

So you're saying that people should really tip based on the food, the timeliness of it's arrival or the presence/absense of a server?

Beach...what does the leave?...Life!

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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Confessions of a Dragon's scribe
Diary of my Heart Surgery

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ThistleSoftware
Little Sales Drummer Boy


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The fancy restaurants I've been in did not have waitstaff with weird obsequiousness issues. The waitstaff were polite, were attentive and prompt, and otherwise left us alone. I have had several waiters at Marie Callendar's type places that were smarmy, overly friendly, and just generally annoying. My favorite waitress ever is this woman at Santa Cruz Diner who works the late shift. She brings you coffee and water without you have to ask and when it's time to order she doesn't say anything, just stands there with the notepad. She doesn't talk much because I think there's something wrong with her throat, so if you go there a lot you know to tell her what kind of toast and how you want your eggs without her asking. She also does everything fast and right, and I try to leave her a big ol' tip.

My experience as a delivery driver is that most people don't tip as much as you think they should.

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Officially Heartless

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momto4+
Deck the Malls


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I base my tip at hotels/restaurants based on the service I receive not by how expensive either place is.
I have never reduced my servers tip based on whether or not my food was good because, they (in most cases) did not cook it. I will complain about it and hope that something is done to correct but if its not I speak to a manager and still dont blame the server.

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A little rudeness and disrespect can elevate a meaningless interaction to a battle of wits and add drama to an otherwise dull day! -Calvin and Hobbes

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jessboo
The First USA Noel


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quote:
Originally posted by Nick Theodorakis:

I usually stay at the level of Comfort Inn/Best Western/etc. when travelling, and I leave a buck or two per night for the maid; many times, though, it's not picked up, so I assume the practice is not so widespread at that level as to be recognized as a tip.

maybe they didn't pick it up because they thought you'd just emptied your trouser pocket. people often do just leave stuff on the table- we woul never assume it was a tip unless there was a thank-you note with it.

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foxbitca
Mashed Potato Time


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quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
So you're saying that people should really tip based on the food, the timeliness of it's arrival or the presence/absense of a server?

No, obviously if the kitchen causes a problem, the server should do whatever is necessary to make it right for the guests. I don't get irritated with a server if the food's taking a long time, as long as they keep checking back and letting me know what's going on, offer other options or a free whatever, etc. Which is what I meant by attentive service. And all I meant about the absence thing is that nobody can be in 18 places at once. If your server's got 10 tables and there's no one to run food, you might have to wait a minute for your tea refill.

Sorry if I'm being obtuse and stubborn; I guess a few too many people stiffed me back in the day for stuff that was out of my control. Tips aren't for the cook.

Also, I haven't had any coffee yet. [Roll Eyes]

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I'm against picketing, but I don't know how to show it. --Mitch Hedberg

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Communication Attempt
Jingle Bell Hock


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quote:
Originally posted by ThistleS:
My experience as a delivery driver is that most people don't tip as much as you think they should.

I think that is exactly what's wrong with the way tipping is handled,people assuming they should be tipped for their services.Somewhere down the line people forgot that tipping is an act of pure generosity from the customer.After you receive the due payment for the product/service,it doesn't matter how well you do,your customer owes you nothing more.

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The fun thing about standards is that they come in so many varieties.

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frogpond
Jingle Sales


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quote:
I think that is exactly what's wrong with the way tipping is handled,people assuming they should be tipped for their services.Somewhere down the line people forgot that tipping is an act of pure generosity from the customer.After you receive the due payment for the product/service,it doesn't matter how well you do,your customer owes you nothing more.

I don't know how service people are typically paid in Canda, but here it is assumed that most of the earnings will be made in tips. You are expected to tip your waiters and waitresses for decent service, there is no way they can possibly make a living otherwise!

What I'm not clear about are the tip jars in places like Starbucks, where items aren't bought to your table. It used to be that tipping was for service to your table, so I'm not sure how much to tip in such situations.

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Blue Phantom
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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Wow! I grew up in the Midwest in a middle-class family, and I learned to tip about 10% (per day) at hotels/motels. We usually stayed at the cheaper motels (back in the 70s-80s), so that worked out to be $3-5/day. And we'd always leave the tip on the day we checked out, not during the stay.

Even today, I use the 10% as a guide and will leave $5-10 per night. And we usually leave the room pretty much as we found it (make the beds, hang the towels up, etc.)

From the sounds of the responses here, I'm generously over-tipping. I don't think I'll change my behavior, but I'm just really surprised that I appear to be well above the median in that regard.

I'm not trying to pat myself on the back or anything. I'm just really surprised, as all these years I thought 10% was the standard, sort of like 15% for restaurants. Hmm.

Blue "still unsure about taxi tips" Phantom

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TwoGuyswithaHat
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by SeaboeMuffinchucker:
I tip at any hotel that costs more than about $50/night. Some things to consider when deciding whether to tip the maid:
  • Am I staying more than one night?
  • Am I a messy guest?
  • Am I asking for extra services?
Generally, if you want to tip and you're not messy, a dollar a day is acceptable. Make sure you do it every day rather than leaving the tip at the end, as the maids who do the daily cleaning might not be the same maids who prep the rooms for the next guests.

Seaboe

I've always wondered why people don't see fit to tip the Front desk staff as in most hotels it is the front desk staff that ensures everything is running smooth, delivers stuff up to rooms and makes sure that the stay is a plesant one. And if anything goes wrong with the stay,we're sure the ones to hear about it. (ETA: No Snark intended, just curious)

quote:
Originally posted by murmurzz:
I (unfortunately) worked as a maid at a "cheap" motel for a short period of time and I, in fact, wasn't aware about tipping maids. I will tell you, though, that the pay is so low because the owners figure that you will receive some tips, even though I don't think many people are aware of the practice. Even receiving a buck in a room was more than welcome.

Now I'll tip at least a dollar wherever I stay.

At my job the housekeepers are paid ever so slightly less than the front desk staff (25-50 cents less per hour I believe).

quote:
Originally posted by Communication Attempt:
I think that is exactly what's wrong with the way tipping is handled,people assuming they should be tipped for their services.Somewhere down the line people forgot that tipping is an act of pure generosity from the customer.After you receive the due payment for the product/service,it doesn't matter how well you do,your customer owes you nothing more.

In Ontario, you ARE expected to tip regardless of service. It's built into the wages and labour laws. As a customer you are in effect subsidising the employer, as the minimum wage for servers is less than general minimum wage, and even less than student minimum wage.

As of right now, minimum wage for servers is $6.75 an hour, which is still less than what general minimum wage was as of 1995.

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BeachLife
The Bills of St. Mary's


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quote:
Originally posted by TwoGuyswithaHat:
...In Ontario, you ARE expected to tip regardless of service. It's built into the wages and labour laws. As a customer you are in effect subsidising the employer, as the minimum wage for servers is less than general minimum wage, and even less than student minimum wage.....

First of all let me say, that's pretty assanine. If you expect everyone to tip say 10% regardless of service, why not just raise the prices 10% and let them tip from there if they like?

Secondly, expected or what? They will call the police on you?

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Confessions of a Dragon's scribe
Diary of my Heart Surgery

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TwoGuyswithaHat
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
]First of all let me say, that's pretty assanine. If you expect everyone to tip say 10% regardless of service, why not just raise the prices 10% and let them tip from there if they like?

Secondly, expected or what? They will call the police on you?

It's not against the law to not tip obviously, but it is built into the minimum wage structure which I do not agree with one bit. But I agree, it is assinine.

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BeachLife
The Bills of St. Mary's


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Okay, I understand, which is pretty much the way it works in the US. I don't agree with it here either, at least not the way it is implemented. If average tips are 3-4 times minimum wage I wouldn't have a problem with it, but when tips just barely squeek out minimum for an employee there is something wrong with the concept all together.

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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Jack Dragon, On Being a Dragon
Confessions of a Dragon's scribe
Diary of my Heart Surgery

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Towknie
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by frogpond:
What I'm not clear about are the tip jars in places like Starbucks, where items aren't bought to your table. It used to be that tipping was for service to your table, so I'm not sure how much to tip in such situations.

Since I'm married to Ms. Starbucks USA, I can tell you explicitly that Starbucks employees who receive tips (baristas and supervisors) are taxed on their paychecks at the rate of .50 an hour. The tips are pooled and divied out based on number of hours worked in a given week. Average weekly tips for somebody working 40 hours is usually about $40-50.

As to how this translates into how much you as an individual should tip, if you're just ordering a basic drip coffee, it's nice to just leave the change from you purchase ($1.80 coffee, pay $2, put the .20 in the jar). If, on the other hand, you are ordering a half caf, double whip, no foam, percetta, three shot, Balinese cat crap coffee bean mocha with three pumps, all ingredients layered and somehow visible through a paper cup while berating your barista that you can't understand the lyrics of the Spanish music that's playing (an actual formal complaint in DWs store last week), then you should start forgoing the coins in favor of the bills. A buck or, if you can spare it, two, would be greatly appreciated.

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Towknie: Ryda-certified as wonderful, enlighted, and rational.

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Gibbie
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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guru,
Gratuities are generally the only things not included in the all inclusive price, so yes, take money to tip with. Bartenders, bell hops, maids. Just like on a cruise, you're expected to tip all of those. There may even be a tip guide available at the resort or on their web page.

Gibbie

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jimmy101
The First USA Noel


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quote:
Originally posted by TwoGuyswithaHat:
quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
]First of all let me say, that's pretty assanine. If you expect everyone to tip say 10% regardless of service, why not just raise the prices 10% and let them tip from there if they like?

Secondly, expected or what? They will call the police on you?

It's not against the law to not tip obviously, but it is built into the minimum wage structure which I do not agree with one bit. But I agree, it is assinine.
It may be assanine but in the US that's the way it is done. IIRC, many places tax their waiters based on their total sales for each shift. If nobody tips'm they are still responsible for the taxes on the 10% (or whatever the IRS figures the average tip is) "expected" tip.
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Bettie Page Turner
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by Gayle:
My own particular delivery experience taught me 4 things:
1. Hospital nurses don't tip at all.

This WV nurse apologizes for her rude Texas colleagues. We always tipped when we ordered food for delivery.

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You fail to consider, for such is the tyranny of fashion, that the swan is not a slim animal... -Jincy Kornhauser, Melinda Falling

Posts: 1762 | From: Charleston, West Virginia | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
BeachLife
The Bills of St. Mary's


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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy101:
quote:
Originally posted by TwoGuyswithaHat:
quote:
Originally posted by BeachLife:
]First of all let me say, that's pretty assanine. If you expect everyone to tip say 10% regardless of service, why not just raise the prices 10% and let them tip from there if they like?

Secondly, expected or what? They will call the police on you?

It's not against the law to not tip obviously, but it is built into the minimum wage structure which I do not agree with one bit. But I agree, it is assinine.
It may be assanine but in the US that's the way it is done. IIRC, many places tax their waiters based on their total sales for each shift. If nobody tips'm they are still responsible for the taxes on the 10% (or whatever the IRS figures the average tip is) "expected" tip.
Companies don't tax they withhold. As a server you are expected to keep a log of your tips on a daily basis. This log can be used as proof to the IRS that you should pay less in taxes. The only caveat is that the IRS has other tools for determining what your earnins probably were. If these numbers are seriously understated it is not difficult for the IRS to determine this. If in fact your tips are extrememly low, it is also not difficult to prove this as well.

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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Jack Dragon, On Being a Dragon
Confessions of a Dragon's scribe
Diary of my Heart Surgery

Posts: 12094 | From: Michigan | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Doug4.7
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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Honestly, I would LOVE for this 'law' to be true. There are a huge number of people who, on one hand condemn illegals as less than human while at the same time are more than willing to benefit from their work. This ‘law’ would be a chance to put their money where their mouth is. If you want to make illegals felons? Then why not make those who benefit from illegals felons? Sounds good to me.

I think many people have no idea what these undocumented workers mean to our economy and lifestyle. They have no idea what the removal of 11-12 million people from the US would cost both to do the actual removal AND the impact on our economy.

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And now for something completely different...

Posts: 4164 | From: Alabama | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Mickey Blue
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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I'll tip for one of two reasons, one is because I really liked the service or whatever it was I was paying for went above and beyond expected, two is because I like going there and tipping has, in some places, turned into a strong arm tactic.

I will tip 10% if service was average.

15% if service was above average.

And 20% if service was very good.

I tip waitstaff in general because they usually make less then minimum wage.

I tip pizza guys/gals a buck, you guys/gals make minimum wage at least, as for all the other 'difficulties', youll have to spare me cause there are litterally tons of other jobs far harder then yours could ever dream to be that are not deemed tip-worthy.


I think that, in this country (and no doubt others) people who are lucky enough to work in jobs deemed tip worthy (there is really no obvious link between said jobs) have got an entitlement complex, they think that they go in, do their time, and should get extra money because.. Err.. Well sometimes its because of some sob story, sometimes its because their job is "hard", etc, etc.

If you do a good job, you deserve a tip, this applies to pretty much any job really but generally its gonna be something we can see with our own eyes and at least percieve as either difficult or thankless or both.. Usually.

If you don't do a good job, or just do the bare minimum, sorry you don't deserve a tip, you may get one because society demands it, but you don't deserve it.


Sorry, turning this into a rant [Smile]

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"All people are responsible for the good that they didn't do"

Posts: 4774 | From: Virginia | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
J Caldwell
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by Mickey Blue:
I tip waitstaff in general because they usually make less then minimum wage.

This is not true in all states. The state of Washington mandated that wait staff must be paid minimum wage plus tips. This did have an affect on the restaurant industry and they lost some restaurants since they had to increase wages for the wait staff, yet the kitchen staff, bus-boys, etc. did not get the same raise in their pay that the wait staff did. You could have a cook getting $8.00/hour while the wait staff would end up taking home $15.00 to $20.00/hour at the same outfit. That does not help morale.
Posts: 163 | From: Austin, TX | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Mickey Blue
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by J Caldwell:
quote:
Originally posted by Mickey Blue:
I tip waitstaff in general because they usually make less then minimum wage.

This is not true in all states. The state of Washington mandated that wait staff must be paid minimum wage plus tips. This did have an affect on the restaurant industry and they lost some restaurants since they had to increase wages for the wait staff, yet the kitchen staff, bus-boys, etc. did not get the same raise in their pay that the wait staff did. You could have a cook getting $8.00/hour while the wait staff would end up taking home $15.00 to $20.00/hour at the same outfit. That does not help morale.
If that were the case I would not feel compelled to tip at all beyond the standard 'forced' tips that are sometimes necessary not to look evil (because we all know some people just deserve extra money for no reason.. No.. Don't ask why)

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"All people are responsible for the good that they didn't do"

Posts: 4774 | From: Virginia | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Esprise Me
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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quote:
Originally posted by guruwan2b:
I thought that an all inclusive vacation would include all tips and gratuities. Anyone have any thoughts on this?

I recently wrote a piece on tipping customs for cruises, which are usually all-inclusive packages, and found, to my surprise, that passengers were still expected to tip servers, bartenders, and chambermaids on all but the most expensive of cruise lines (Silver Seas Cruises, which will accept kidneys and firstborn children if you don't have any gold bullion, discourages tipping, for example, but you'd better help subsidize those working-class folk on Carnival.) I know, it seems silly, but there it is.
Oh, and Gayle:
quote:
Whoever designed Orange Tree Condominiums gave a box of numbers to someone who was apparently unfamiliar with base 10 and said "go number these apartments) 10 is next to 17 and over 43 which is next to 11. Yeah. Piece of cake.

This statement caused beer to shoot out my nose. Will you be delivering that new keyboard anytime soon?

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"If God wrote it, the grammar must be infallible. Perhaps it is we who are mistaken." -MapleLeaf

Posts: 977 | From: Boston, MA | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
apkjkk
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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I can shed some light regarding the OP and El Camino's posts. DH works on Capitol Hill and has spent some time talking with immigration officials, so he's told me plenty on the issue.

Several months back (December, I think), the House passed a bill that would make aiding illegal immigrants a felony. However, the Senate has not passed such a bill, so it is not yet a law. The senate was debating passing whether to pass a similar bill, or a different one, but nothing was accomplished before the spring recess a few weeks back. I don't know if they have resumed work on it or not.

Even if such a bill became a law, ICE would never enforce it to such a degree as in the OP. Frankly, according to the people DH has talked to, there is just not enough money or manpower to research and prosecute people for every little tip a person may leave a hotel or restaurant worker. They are going to focus more on the people who help illegals come into the country, and those who hire them - fry the big fish, not the little ones.

Sorry that got to be so long! Basically, my point is that this email is (probably very obviously) completely false.

Jen

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Trixie Tang
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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I've been having problems posting lately, so I hope this shows up.

I waited tables/bartended for years. There are few things in this world that can piss me off more than a person who does not tip. I can understand arguements against tipping, "Why should I have to pay more?" "Why isn't their employer paying them decent wages?" Blah blah blah...

It's a simple fact that tipping is required in polite society in certain situations. Any person that provides a service to you that you can provide yourself needs to be tipped. This includes servers, chambermaids, doormen, mailmen, baggage handlers and garbage men.

The pro- tipping arguement is always the same- "We get paid so little! How can you not tip?" A person's salary is no one's business but his own, and really don't care how much he's getting paid. I tip because I'm an adult and I'm polite, and like being percieved as such. Have a problem with a someone's service? Speak to his supervisor, request someone else, write a comment card. Don't make a complete ass of yourself by not tipping. (Don't fool yourself. That's exactly what you're doing.) Especially if you're with a group of people. Do you have any idea I've been approached by embarrassed people the next day apologizing for a friend's rude behavior?

If you are not in a situation where switching servers is appropriate, leave a modest tip along with a comment card explaining your dissatisfaction with your service. Next time you eat at the restaurant, request a different server. It's that simple. Of course you will recieve bad service every once in a while no matter where you go. Only by acting like an adult and communicating your concerns will things change. If you continue to recieve bad service after expressing yourself, stop frequenting that establishment. Losing your business is much more effective than not tipping.

Not tipping is an act of aggresion, and no one is immpressed with your abilities to piss off poor people.

Posts: 46 | From: Donaldsonville, LA | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Bill Door
I Saw Three Shipments


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quote:
Originally posted by Trixie Tang:
It's a simple fact that tipping is required in polite society in certain situations...

It's a simple fact that tipping is required in USA society in certain situations...

Or ar you saying that the Brits and Aussies are all rude? [Big Grin]

- Bill Door

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Methuselah
Happy Holly Days


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quote:
Originally posted by Trixie Tang:
If you are not in a situation where switching servers is appropriate, leave a modest tip along with a comment card explaining your dissatisfaction with your service. Next time you eat at the restaurant, request a different server. It's that simple.

Let's say you hire someone to paint your fence, and instead he sits in your backyard getting drunk. Do you still pay him but hand him a note saying how disappointed you are?

In jobs where it is customary to tip, the tip is for service provided. If service is lousy, tip is lousy. If service is standard, tip is standard. Get it?

quote:
Not tipping is an act of aggresion, and no one is immpressed with your abilities to piss off poor people.
Providing bad service can also be an act of aggression. Presenting an attitude of expectation in regards to a tip can be an act of aggression. You are not 'entitled" to my money. You EARN my money. You said it yourself, I could do the job myself...leaving you completely unemployed. Therefore if you are not providing me with service better than what I can do on my own, you are worthless.

And as far as the "poor people" comment, not all service industry workers are poor. There are Las Vegas valets who make more than twice what I earn in a year at my white collar management job.

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"The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him." - G.K. Chesterton

Posts: 1514 | From: Wisconsin | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
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