snopes.com Post new topic  Post a reply
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Urban Legends » Politics » A U.S. Immigrant to Mexico

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: A U.S. Immigrant to Mexico
snopes
Return! Return! Return!


Icon 600 posted      Profile for snopes   Author's Homepage   E-mail snopes       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The following from a director with SW BELL in Mexico City.

I spent five years working in Mexico.

I worked under a tourist visa for three months and could legally renew it for three more months.After that you were working illegally. I was technically illegal for three weeks waiting on the FM3 approval.

During that six months our Mexican and US Attorneys were working to secure a permanent work visa called a FM3. It was in addition to my US passport that I had to show each time I entered and left the country. Barbara's was the same except hers did not permit her to work.

To apply for the FM3 I needed to submit the following notarized originals (not copies) of my:

1. Birth certificates for Barbara and me.

2. Marriage certificate.

3. High school transcripts and proof of graduation.

4. College transcripts for every college I attended and proof of graduation.

5.Two letters of recommendation from supervisors I had worked for at least one year.

6. A letter from the St. Louis Chief of Police indicating I had no arrest record in the US and no outstanding warrants and was "a citizen in good standing."

7. Finally; I had to write a letter about myself that clearly stated why there was no Mexican citizen with my skills and why my skills were important to Mexico. We called it our "I am the greatest person on earth" letter. It was fun to write.

All of the above were in English that had to be translated into Spanish and be certified as legal translations and our signatures notarized. It produced a folder about 1.5 inches thick with English on the left side and Spanish on the right.

Once they were completed Barbara and I spent about five hours accompanied by a Mexican attorney touring Mexican government office locations and being photographed and fingerprinted at least three times. At each location (and we remember at least four locations) we were instructed on Mexican tax, labor, housing, and criminal law and that we were required to obey their laws or face the consequences. We could not protest any of the government's actions or we would be committing a felony. We paid out four thousand dollars in fees and bribes to complete the process. When this was done we could legally bring in our household goods that were held by US customs in Loredo Texas. This meant we rented furniture in Mexico while awaiting our goods. There were extensive fees involved here that the company paid.

We could not buy a home and were required to rent at very high rates and under contract and compliance with Mexican law.

We were required to get a Mexican drivers license. This was an amazing process. The company arranged for the licensing agency to come to our headquarters location with their photography and finger print equipment and the laminating machine. We showed our US license, were photographed and fingerprinted again and issued the license instantly after paying out a six dollar fee. We did not take a written or driving test and never received instructions on the rules of the road. Our only instruction was never give a policeman your license if stopped and asked. We were instructed to hold it against the inside window away from his grasp. If he got his hands on it you would have to pay ransom to get it back.

We then had to pay and file Mexican income tax annually using the number of our FM3 as our ID number. The companies Mexican accountants did this for us and we just signed what they prepared. I was about twenty legal size pages annually.

The FM 3 was good for three years and renewable for two more after paying more fees.

Leaving the country meant turning in the FM# and certifying we were leaving no debts behind and no outstanding legal affairs (warrants, tickets or liens) before our household goods were released to customs. It was a real adventure and If any of our senators or congressmen went through it once they would have a different attitude toward Mexico.

The Mexican Government uses its vast military and police forces to keep its citizens intimidated and compliant. They never protest at their White House or government offices but do protest daily in front of the United States Embassy. The US embassy looks like a strongly reinforced fortress and during most protests the Mexican Military surround the block with their men standing shoulder to shoulder in full riot gear to protect the Embassy. These protests are never shown on US or Mexican TV. There is a large public park across the street where they do their protesting. Anything can cause a protest such as proposed law changes in California or Texas.

Please feel free to share this with everyone who thinks we are being hard on illegal immigrants

Posts: 36029 | From: Admin | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
snapdragonfly
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for snapdragonfly     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
...and why would we want the U.S. to be the same way?

--------------------
"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

Posts: 2397 | From: Texarkana, TX | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Methuselah
Happy Holly Days


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Methuselah     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
So...he was an illegal immigrant, stealing a job from a Mexican citizen, and yet the Mexican government decided to grant amnesty and allow him to live and work in a place that he chose for the betterment of his family.

What's this guys beef with Mexican immigrants to the US exactly?

--------------------
"The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him." - G.K. Chesterton

Posts: 1514 | From: Wisconsin | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Mistletoey Chloe
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Mistletoey Chloe     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Notice that he got to write in English and use translation services. Obviously, he was not interested in assimilating.

And no back taxes, either.

--------------------
~~Ai am in mai prrrrrraime!~~

Posts: 10111 | From: Oklahoma | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Errata
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Errata   E-mail Errata   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The only disturbing part is the corruption. Corruption is a serious problem in Mexico and much of the rest of the third world. It plays a huge part in stifling the development of their economies.
Posts: 2018 | From: Santa Barbara, California | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
AnglsWeHvHrdOnHiRdr
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for AnglsWeHvHrdOnHiRdr     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Errata:
The only disturbing part is the corruption. Corruption is a serious problem in Mexico and much of the rest of the third world. It plays a huge part in stifling the development of their economies.

Hmmm....

I would say that the way political campaigns are funded in the US are nothing more than legally-sanctioned bribery.

--------------------
"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."--George Bernard Shaw

Posts: 19266 | From: Nashville, TN | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Errata
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Errata   E-mail Errata   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by AnglRdr:
quote:
Originally posted by Errata:
The only disturbing part is the corruption. Corruption is a serious problem in Mexico and much of the rest of the third world. It plays a huge part in stifling the development of their economies.

Hmmm....

I would say that the way political campaigns are funded in the US are nothing more than legally-sanctioned bribery.

Yes, and in the US, police rob you. Oh wait. No they don't. My friend's relatives in Mexico have to pay regular bribes to the local police for "protection" of their business. And if they didn't it would be the police themselves they needed protection against. Just like gangsters in old crime fiction, but worse because they're supposed to be authority figures.

There is simply nothing comparable in the US.

All political ads get you is exposure. You still have to trick people into voting for you. No amount of campaign spending can guarantee a victory. It will enhance your voter base, certainly, but you have to have that base of people who are politically aligned with you to begin with.

Third world business are stifled because of daily security risks and petty beurocratic theft. No matter what venom you want to spew about the US, it runs efficiently, and its a safe place to invest in infrastructure. The same can't be said about third world kleptocracies, and thats a major reason why some countries remain poor while others flourish.

Posts: 2018 | From: Santa Barbara, California | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
AnglsWeHvHrdOnHiRdr
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for AnglsWeHvHrdOnHiRdr     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Errata:
quote:
Originally posted by AnglRdr:
quote:
Originally posted by Errata:
The only disturbing part is the corruption. Corruption is a serious problem in Mexico and much of the rest of the third world. It plays a huge part in stifling the development of their economies.

Hmmm....

I would say that the way political campaigns are funded in the US are nothing more than legally-sanctioned bribery.

Yes, and in the US, police rob you. Oh wait. No they don't. My friend's relatives in Mexico have to pay regular bribes to the local police for "protection" of their business. And if they didn't it would be the police themselves they needed protection against. Just like gangsters in old crime fiction, but worse because they're supposed to be authority figures.

There is simply nothing comparable in the US.

All political ads get you is exposure. You still have to trick people into voting for you. No amount of campaign spending can guarantee a victory. It will enhance your voter base, certainly, but you have to have that base of people who are politically aligned with you to begin with.

Third world business are stifled because of daily security risks and petty beurocratic theft. No matter what venom you want to spew about the US, it runs efficiently, and its a safe place to invest in infrastructure. The same can't be said about third world kleptocracies, and thats a major reason why some countries remain poor while others flourish.

Who contributes to political campaigns? Who gets access to elected officials? Who is able to lobby for favorable legislation?

While it isn't as bad as it is in most developing countries, pretending it doesn't exist also doesn't do any good.

--------------------
"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."--George Bernard Shaw

Posts: 19266 | From: Nashville, TN | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Communication Attempt
Jingle Bell Hock


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Communication Attempt   E-mail Communication Attempt       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by snopes:
Our only instruction was never give a policeman your license if stopped and asked. We were instructed to hold it against the inside window away from his grasp. If he got his hands on it you would have to pay ransom to get it back.

So...is it a common practice for mexican policemen to steal driving licenses?

--------------------
"I love God,he's so deliciously evil!" -Stewie,Family Guy

The fun thing about standards is that they come in so many varieties.

Posts: 510 | From: Ontario, Canada | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
nicky
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for nicky   E-mail nicky   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
This 'report' is exaggerated and/or out of date,
and/or, Bell SW are useless at advising and supporting their stafdf.

Posts: 60 | From: London | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Ganzfeld
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Ganzfeld     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
This is basically about legal immigration, not illegal. Legal immigration to most countries, including the US, is also pretty hard. It depends of course on the type of visa, among other factors, as it probably does in Mexico. This only describes one type of visa. Certain restrictions (such as being able to buy property) may apply to certain visas and not to others, as in every country. It would be interesting to see a real comparison beween different countries, including many different visa types, including no visa and illegal entry. (But this isn't it.)
Posts: 4922 | From: Kyoto, Japan | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Methuselah
Happy Holly Days


Icon 500 posted      Profile for Methuselah     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ganzfeld:
Certain restrictions (such as being able to buy property) may apply to certain visas and not to others, as in every country.

I believe that only Mexican citizens (or Mexican corporations) can legally own property (as in real estate) in Mexico. But, I could be mistaken...can't find a cite right now.

--------------------
"The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him." - G.K. Chesterton

Posts: 1514 | From: Wisconsin | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
snapdragonfly
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for snapdragonfly     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Methuselah:
quote:
Originally posted by Ganzfeld:
Certain restrictions (such as being able to buy property) may apply to certain visas and not to others, as in every country.

I believe that only Mexican citizens (or Mexican corporations) can legally own property (as in real estate) in Mexico. But, I could be mistaken...can't find a cite right now.
Don't know where a cite is either but that is my understanding, also. I have some relatives who spend a lot of time in Mexico and kinda know firsthand quite a bit about stuff like that.

And while I agree that US politics is starting to smell really bad (and that no paper trail electronic voting is unbelievably bad news) it's true that in Mexico, the corruption and payola is not like anything in America. It's the norm, not the exception, and while in America, we are still horrified about scams (even though we like to pretend they are all perpetrated by the OTHER political party)over there, it's just *shrug* how it is.

You do NOT want to get into a car wreck in Mexico. There is no determination of who was at fault or anything like that - they just arrest everyone. Of course what you do is just bribe your way out. We grew up close to Juarez and it was common knowledge that "if you get in a wreck there, just get out of the car and walk away as fast as you can and just LEAVE the car." I never knew anyone to get into a car wreck there, though, so I don't know what would happen if you actually waited for the police to come.

Mexico SHOULD be a wealthy nation - it has the same wonderful natural resources as we do in the States, good farm land, two coasts, mineral resources. It's a tragedy that all the wealth is in the hands of a very few and the rest is so desperately poor.

It's what I fear happening to America.

--------------------
"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

Posts: 2397 | From: Texarkana, TX | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jason Threadslayer
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jason Threadslayer     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Methuselah:
I believe that only Mexican citizens (or Mexican corporations) can legally own property (as in real estate) in Mexico. But, I could be mistaken...can't find a cite right now.

Foreigners are allowed to land in Mexico as long as it is not within a certain distance of the coastline or border.

Try this thread for what I found regarding Mexican immigration law.

--------------------
All posts foretold by Nostradamus.

Turing test failures: 6

Posts: 5481 | From: Decatur, GA | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jason Threadslayer
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jason Threadslayer     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by snapdragonfly:
And while I agree that US politics is starting to smell really bad (and that no paper trail electronic voting is unbelievably bad news) it's true that in Mexico, the corruption and payola is not like anything in America. It's the norm, not the exception, and while in America, we are still horrified about scams (even though we like to pretend they are all perpetrated by the OTHER political party)over there, it's just *shrug* how it is.

I hear the same thing from my relatives -- bribes for water, bribes for passports, bribes for school, etc.

--------------------
All posts foretold by Nostradamus.

Turing test failures: 6

Posts: 5481 | From: Decatur, GA | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
PatYoung
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for PatYoung   E-mail PatYoung   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by snopes:

I worked under a tourist visa for three months and could legally renew it for three more months.After that you were working illegally. I was technically illegal for three weeks waiting on the FM3 approval.


Had he been in the U.S. woking "under a tourist visa" would itself have been illegal and would have permanently barred him, in most cases, from adjusting status to permanent resident.

BTW, for an employment based visa in the U.S. 4,000 in fees would be cheap.

--------------------
pat "Megadittoes Rush" young

THUMP, THUMP, THUMP

Posts: 5442 | From: New York | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jason Threadslayer
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jason Threadslayer     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by PatYoung:
Had he been in the U.S. woking "under a tourist visa" would itself have been illegal and would have permanently barred him, in most cases, from adjusting status to permanent resident.

Mexico uses a tourist visa instead of a business visa for short term work.

--------------------
All posts foretold by Nostradamus.

Turing test failures: 6

Posts: 5481 | From: Decatur, GA | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
nicky
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for nicky   E-mail nicky   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Non-mexicans are now allowed to buy property anywhere in Mexico.
Posts: 60 | From: London | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
hudders
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for hudders   Author's Homepage   E-mail hudders   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by snopes:
They never protest at their White House or government offices but do protest daily in front of the United States Embassy.

The White House? In Mexico?

No wonder they never protest at it.

Posts: 81 | From: Bourne, UK | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jason Threadslayer
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jason Threadslayer     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by nicky:
Non-mexicans are now allowed to buy property anywhere in Mexico.

Within 100 km of the borders and 50 km of the ocean, it must be in a trust held by a Mexican bank.

--------------------
All posts foretold by Nostradamus.

Turing test failures: 6

Posts: 5481 | From: Decatur, GA | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post new topic  Post a reply Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2