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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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quote:
Originally posted by bloodaxe:
Whilst the English can swear at a friend using most abuse and be humorous, I think 'wanker' generally isn't one of those terms. Mind you "you f**cking c**t" isn't generally ever used humorously either!

The "w" word often gets used round here as a term of friendly abuse. Admittedly us engineers may have a more robust vocabulary than many other folks. Tone of voice and facial expression are important though. One of my colleagues uses it as noun, adjective and verb - often in the same sentence!

My workday begins with a cup of coffee and several minutes of friendly abuse from colleagues in response to my "Mornin' how's things?". It sets us up for the rest of the day!

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Llewtrah's Soapbox

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bloodaxe
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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Well, that's the thing isn't it! Normally in a British workplace you get abuse as part of the job- if you don't get called worse than shite they don't like you! 'Wanker' is a bit tricky I'll grant you, you need to be pretty good terms with someone to call them it! The worst abuse is usually reserved for the most popular. "Taking the piss" is such a part of British culture that I think it bewilders some people overseas, not because they don't do it themselves, more that they don't expect the British to do it.
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Hans Off
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by Bored and Dangerous:
quote:

Ever heard of sarcasm and facetiousness? [Roll Eyes] Apparently American humor is lost on you, just as you claim British humor is lost on me. You also missed the part where I said:

[QUOTE]I used wanker in a sentence that got the most "tongue in cheek" value. Seems you missed that as well.

Nothing's come full circle--you're just interpreting it how you like, in pieces.

I'm sure you've never used a piece of American slang in the incorrect way (to them), either, right? Because people surely wouldn't make fun of you if you did. Because, y'know, British people are above reproach as far as their language skills go. [flame]

Lol, I am one of the most sarcastic people I know!
No one claimed that British humour was lost on you, just that you didn't quite have the nuances correct!

My post should have been taken at face value. I enjoyed that thread and the phrase

quote:


"Go wank off, you wannabe wanker."




has had me the closest to a literal YOMANK as any that I can remember, so perhaps you should remove the chip and take a bow eh?

and no I didn't miss the part where you said that it had the most tongue in cheek value. I was quoting my highlight of it.


as for...

quote:
I'm sure you've never used a piece of American slang in the incorrect way (to them), either, right?
wrong, I have and had the sense of humour to roll with it

and...

quote:
Because, y'know, British people are above reproach as far as their language skills go.
Better check that chip on your shoulder you'll do yer back in.


Or at least admit that it is a munchkin!

we are your support group here!

I like you B & D But you need to be a teensy bit less defensive about this stuff!

As you Americanadians say...

ahem

Don't Have A Cow Mister


Hans "Was only reminising on an entertaining thread that made me laugh" Off


P.S.

Oh yeah and as for...
quote:

And, no, that wasn't the correct thread.

I think you might find that it was first alluded to in a post by myself...


quote:


[mini hijack] IIRC we have had this "debate" before B & D ... [/mini hijack]


...and it was the exact thread I was thinking of so you may shove that one in your pipe and smoke it!


f'nar f'nar

M'kay?

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"British English speakers point to Americans adding more syllables so that they can make even more noise without actually saying anything." Llewtrah


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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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This may appeal to those with an interest in British slang terms. It's a National health Service booklet for doctors unfamiliar with the lingo in the Yorkshire area. It doesn't have the "w" word, but in does include a few other things mentioned in passing on this topic!

http://www.doncasterwestpct.nhs.uk/uploads/reports/GlossaryforInternationalRecruits.pdf

and if that link goes dead, there is a version here:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/04/24/glossaryforinternationalrecruits.pdf

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Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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Excellent! Let's try this out:

"It's me snatch, doctor - I'm on me Honda and I've got fishdocks. Can ye give us owt forrit?"

Hmm, might be more convincing if I was female.

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Tarquin Farquart
The First USA Noel


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Ay up! Eh? Got a noggling pain in mt noggin. Nah, Barnsley are at home today. Playing Rotherham. And toot babby is roaring.

Hmm...

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Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


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quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
Excellent! Let's try this out:

"It's me snatch, doctor - I'm on me Honda and I've got fishdocks. Can ye give us owt forrit?"

Hmm, might be more convincing if I was female.

Uh-oh, Rich'W has started channeling The Fat Slags [lol]

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Dactingyl
Anchovy of a 1000 Days


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Out of interest, why do words have to have the same meaning in both countries?

We say fag to mean cigarette. They say fag to mean homosexual. Are either of us wrong?

I don't even find wanker particularly harsh, I shout it quite regularly at the man in black at football.

Football, there's another one, different meaning in both countries (although having watched British American Football side the PA Knights a couple of times, where your feet come into it I'm not entirely sure).

B&D does certainly have a chip against the British (I also hate that term, I am also English!). One things American's do which I really can't work out is use the phrase "I could care less" whereas the more commonly used version over here is "I couldn't care less". Surely the latter makes far more sense in the context it is used.

On a completley different note, on a visit to New York none of the American's I met seemed to know what queue meant as in "Where is the back of the queue?". Is this word used in the USofA?

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Dactingyl is meant to sound a bit like Christingle.

It's not very good but I couldn't think of anything else.

Sorry.

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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No, in the States you "stand in line".

"I could care less" is ironic. The full thought is "I suppose it's possible that I could care less, but it sure is unlikely."

When I first came to England, I referred to British football as "soccer", and was slapped down. Then, months later, I heard an Englishman use it.

I'd stepped into a typical British class minefield. "Soccer" is University slang for "Association football", as opposed to "rugger", for "Rugby football".

I think my first interlocutors were annoyed at my taking on 'varsity airs.

Another interesting point: where most Brits speak of the summer 'holidays', Oxford and Cambridge say 'vacation'. I suppose the usage migrated over to the States via Harvard etc...

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Andrew of Ware, England
A-Ware in a Manger


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quote:
Originally posted by Alex Buchet:

When I first came to England, I referred to British football as "soccer", and was slapped down. Then, months later, I heard an Englishman use it.

...

I'd stepped into a typical British class minefield. "Soccer" is University slang for "Association football", as opposed to "rugger", for "Rugby football".

Another interesting point: where most Brits speak of the summer 'holidays', Oxford and Cambridge say 'vacation'. I suppose the usage migrated over to the States via Harvard etc...

I believe that the word 'soccer' coming from 'Association' is an urban legend. I remember seeing on a television programme that the word 'soccer' was in use before 'association football' ever came into being. Was it in the programme 'Balderash and Piffle'?

However, you are quite right in that 'soccer' is only used by 'posh' people who refer to 'football' as meaning 'rugby'.

As regards 'vacation' and 'holidays', the former is used by all universities, especially for their long summer break. 'Holidays' is used by everyone, especially (but not exclusively) when they go away from home for a break.

(BTW, in case I get shot down in flames, I am not saying that Americans are wrong to use these words in a different way from us 'English' and neither I am saying we are correct! Please don't shoot. I'm only little.)

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Andrew, Ware, England

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Stoneage Dinosaur
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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quote:
Originally posted by Andrew of Ware, England:
I believe that the word 'soccer' coming from 'Association' is an urban legend. I remember seeing on a television programme that the word 'soccer' was in use before 'association football' ever came into being. Was it in the programme 'Balderash and Piffle'?

It was from the programme Balderdash and Piffle, which noted that the first recorded use of the word soccer was in the 1880s. The presenter Rory McGrath did give some possible alternative explanations for its origin, which this website also considers plausible.

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"You learn something new every day if you're not careful" - Wilf Lunn

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Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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Hmm, that map with "Castle Soceries" is interesting, but I think that his doubt over the contraction of "Association" to "soccer" is weak.

He thinks it should have been contracted to "sosser" instead because of the soft "c" in "Association", but "Association" or "Society" can themselves be contracted to "Soc" in University slang.

OK, Soc does usually refer to Society (I can't remember if it is used for Association too), but at the least it's still a clear example from University slang of a soft "c" changing to a hard "c" in a contraction.

(edit) I guess I'm not really clear on why it needs an explanation beyond the generally accepted one. The timescales fit the general theory; there's no reference to the use of the word from before the Football Association came into being. The only objection seems to be a theoretical one on the basis that it doesn't follow a "rule" for contractions. And surely "rules" in English aren't hard-and-fast!

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Nick Theodorakis
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by Alex Buchet:
No, in the States you "stand in line".
...

Except perhaps in New York City, where I have heard natives saying they are "on line."

I've worked with very many people from the UKoGBaNI over the years, so I have got used to many strange phrases, but many times I have needed clarification. E.g. to one coworker I always used to ask:

"I keep forgetting: Is 'naff' good or bad?"

I've also learned that "bollocks" is bad, unless they're "dogs' bollocks," in which case they're good, for some reason.

The other confusing thing was another colleague, who, althoug he is not Cockney, had a penchant for dropping rhyming Cockney slang into ordinary conversation.

Nick

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forcadragons
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by Nick Theodorakis:
quote:
Originally posted by Alex Buchet:
No, in the States you "stand in line".
...

Except perhaps in New York City, where I have heard natives saying they are "on line."

I've worked with very many people from the UKoGBaNI over the years, so I have got used to many strange phrases, but many times I have needed clarification. E.g. to one coworker I always used to ask:

"I keep forgetting: Is 'naff' good or bad?"

I've also learned that "bollocks" is bad, unless they're "dogs' bollocks," in which case they're good, for some reason.

The other confusing thing was another colleague, who, althoug he is not Cockney, had a penchant for dropping rhyming Cockney slang into ordinary conversation.

Nick

UKoGBaNI - interesting acronym.

re. dog's bollocks... I'm not 100% sure but I always assumed that it was an observation that they must be something special given the amount of attention a dog gives them.

Around the time of the film "Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels" a lot of non-Londoners found it fashionable to try talking like a Cockney. I believe the correct way to describe these people is Mockney.

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Gale
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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Anyone notice that the Geico gecko has changed accents? I guess he's supposed to be a hipper lizard?
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Dactingyl
Anchovy of a 1000 Days


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quote:
Originally posted by forcadragons:


Around the time of the film "Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels" a lot of non-Londoners found it fashionable to try talking like a Cockney. I believe the correct way to describe these people is Mockney. [/QB]

Mockney isn't so much the use of rhyming slang, it's when teenagers from WASP towns insist on talking in a way that gives the impression they were never taught any diction.

I think of lot of people use rhyming slang in every day conversation without even thinking about it as it seeps into everyday speech. My 50 year old co-worker used "I'm creamed" for tired earlier today and she's hardly a Mockney.

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Dactingyl is meant to sound a bit like Christingle.

It's not very good but I couldn't think of anything else.

Sorry.

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jessboo
The First USA Noel


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warning- slight hijack

right, what is it with all the hampshire people?! we're all fairly new and we're all from hampshire- maybe there's something in the water.

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Join me on Lost - www.lost.eu/edcf

Do you have any wine? All of this would go a lot smoother in an altered state of reality.

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Dactingyl
Anchovy of a 1000 Days


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quote:
Originally posted by jessboo:
warning- slight hijack

right, what is it with all the hampshire people?! we're all fairly new and we're all from hampshire- maybe there's something in the water.

How I found Snopes.com by Chris from Farnborough, Hants.

Eh...hem.

I was originaly pointed towards the Straight Dope via a football messageboard when someone was spreading a myth which Cecil had debunked. From that I found Snopes and after months of reading the boards I finally registered.

Maybe we are all fans of Farnborough Town FC and read the messageboard and went through the same process...however, I'm doubting that.

On a complete tangent, I love your sig line. QI has to be one of the funniest programmes on television.

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Dactingyl is meant to sound a bit like Christingle.

It's not very good but I couldn't think of anything else.

Sorry.

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jessboo
The First USA Noel


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football messageboard eh...f365 by any chance?

ooh did you see QI the other day when they had to make their own scores up? sheer brilliance!

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Do you have any wine? All of this would go a lot smoother in an altered state of reality.

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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I heard a fun new bit of rhyming slang recently--

"beck" for "snack".

"Beck and Posh= nosh."

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