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Author Topic: Pit Bulls want more blood
DesertRat
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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Show me a biting incident, and--probably eight times out of ten-- I'll show you a human dumbass doing something either deliberately or unintentionally threatening to the dog.

That's been my experience, anyway. There are relatively few bad dogs... but plenty of ignorant owners.

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glisp42
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Amen brother. I have wolf crosses myself and the first thing I explain to someone new approaching them is to get down on one knee and pet them under the chin. Being on one knee brings you to their level and rubbing under the chin does not assert dominance the way that petting on top of the head does.

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Barbara R.
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My family owned three dogs in a period over 25 years. They were so sweet and gentle! The last one was a purebreed male tricolor beagle we called Barney. We owned him for 11 years until he died of natural causes. I have never heard of a beagle killing a human being, although one woman in Australia posted a message on a beagle lovers message board that one of her beagles suddenly became violent and had to be euthanized. Sorry for her!

I'm not sure why SOME breeds have been known to kill peoples. It's said that these breed were once inbred that is supposed to make them aggressive. In addition to pit bulls there are presa canarios. Two of these once killed a woman in San Francisco five years ago. There was a criminal trial where the dogs' owners were convicted of murder but these convictions were overturned. They were also convicted of owning vicious breed of dog and these sentences were served out.

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Seraphina
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The problem with pit bulls is that their jaws are can exert pressure many times stronger than many other breeds. People who say Chihuahuas are lot more aggressive than other dogs are right, but the Chihuahua has very little chance to seriously hurt anybody. And that is what matters. Other large breeds can do also lot of damage, so temperament is very important. I used to have Great Danes, they were all very relaxed and friendly dogs, yet when I was confronted by an aggressive person they protected me - by standing in front of me and growling at him.
I do not understand why would anybody want the responsibility of keeping an aggressive dog. The thing with pit bulls is that the cases we had here were all of dogs kept as family pets, and the owner claims they were the sweetest loveliest dogs, until one day they attacked without warning. I have witnessed one such a attack at friends’ place, when 2 of her dogs were peacefully asleep in opposite corners of the same room, then suddenly they jumped up both at the same time, rushed at each other, and fought until one was dead and the other badly injured. There were 3 of us in the room, all experienced dog handlers, but we were unable to separate them. These dogs lived together for several years, never showing any sign of aggression towards each other. Unpredictability, coupled with extremely strong jaws can be a lethal combination. So when people say “my bullterrier is the gentlest sweetest dog”, all what I can say : well so were those 2 I knewonce......

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strange_little_girl
The First USA Noel


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Baby dies after Rottweiler attack

The TV news said the baby was dragged out of the window onto the roof by these dogs. Proof that you should always take care of kids round dangerous dogs. I doubt very much if the baby here was old enough to provoke the dogs by poking or annoying them.

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Ryda Wong, EBfCo.
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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quote:
Originally posted by Barbara R.:
My family owned three dogs in a period over 25 years. They were so sweet and gentle! The last one was a purebreed male tricolor beagle we called Barney. We owned him for 11 years until he died of natural causes. I have never heard of a beagle killing a human being, although one woman in Australia posted a message on a beagle lovers message board that one of her beagles suddenly became violent and had to be euthanized. Sorry for her!

Hmmm, that's odd. When I was a kid, we also had a purebred beagle named Barney. He was quite vicious, despite our best efforts. Backyard breeder special. Now, he didn't kill us, but he certainly tried. And if we'd been smaller, he could have. Lets ban beagles!


quote:
Originally posted by Barbara R.:

I'm not sure why SOME breeds have been known to kill peoples.

We've already explained why on the previous pages of this thread.
quote:
Originally posted by Barbara R.:

It's said that these breed were once inbred that is supposed to make them aggressive.

And it's said the moon is made of cheese. However, I'm going to trust the scientists who say the moon isn't made of cheese, seeing as how they know what they are talking about. They weren't "inbred" to make them "aggressive". They were bred for gameness, tenacity, and extreme tolerance for humans.

quote:
Originally posted by Barbara R.:

In addition to pit bulls there are presa canarios. Two of these once killed a woman in San Francisco five years ago. There was a criminal trial where the dogs' owners were convicted of murder but these convictions were overturned. They were also convicted of owning vicious breed of dog and these sentences were served out.

Yes. Presa Canarios do exist. They did kill a woman. We've already discussed that case. Has nothing to do with pit bulls or presas as a breed, and everything to do with crazy owners.

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Llewtrah
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Updated details on baby killed by Rottweilers

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/leicestershire/5376788.stm
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/leicestershire/5375520.stm

The baby probably made mewling noises that caused the dogs to treat it like a small prey animal. It sounds like the dogs were encouraged to be aggressive.

I've known good Rotties and bad Rotties. I also know temperamental or strong-willed Rotties whose owners were excellent, who understood their dogs' behaviour and who kept their dogs under control and took no risks (very definitely not leaving them unattended with children nearby because a strong playful dog can do damage even if it isn't being aggressive).

Seems like the owners of the dogs in the BBC news story didn't train their guard dogs, but just encouraged them to be aggressive. That attitude can turn potentially good dogs with directed aggression (I'm thinking of police dogs) into time-bombs.

quote:
Chris Lawrence, veterinary director of the Dogs Trust, said a change in the law might be necessary to minimise the possibility of this sort of attack.
More "Dangerous Dogs" legislation? The current legislation here is unenforceable and results in dogs being destroyed even though they've done no wrong.

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Llewtrah
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quote:
Originally posted by Barbara R.:
I'm not sure why SOME breeds have been known to kill peoples. It's said that these breed were once inbred that is supposed to make them aggressive.

Inbreeding won't make animals aggressive, but inbreeding selectively for aggression or inbreeding from aggressive stock because you don't have any other stock to breed from is likely to "fix" any genetic basis for the trait. You can selectively inbreed for docility too. Nature and nurture interact, so the way the animal is brought up will influence its temperament but not override it completely.


Even with inbreeding, some of the animals will buck the trend and have very different looks or temperament from the rest of the breed.

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snapdragonfly
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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
Updated details on baby killed by Rottweilers

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/leicestershire/5376788.stm
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/leicestershire/5375520.stm

The baby probably made mewling noises that caused the dogs to treat it like a small prey animal. It sounds like the dogs were encouraged to be aggressive.

I've known good Rotties and bad Rotties. I also know temperamental or strong-willed Rotties whose owners were excellent, who understood their dogs' behaviour and who kept their dogs under control and took no risks (very definitely not leaving them unattended with children nearby because a strong playful dog can do damage even if it isn't being aggressive).

Seems like the owners of the dogs in the BBC news story didn't train their guard dogs, but just encouraged them to be aggressive. That attitude can turn potentially good dogs with directed aggression (I'm thinking of police dogs) into time-bombs.

quote:
Chris Lawrence, veterinary director of the Dogs Trust, said a change in the law might be necessary to minimise the possibility of this sort of attack.
More "Dangerous Dogs" legislation? The current legislation here is unenforceable and results in dogs being destroyed even though they've done no wrong.
That is exactly why my husband didn't permit any dogs at all to be anywhere near our children when they were babies. Because the kids might accidentally do something to make the dogs attack.

Might not be the dogs fault, but who gives a s*** if your kid is attacked and killed if the dog was just "doing what is instinctive" or not...small comfort.

If some dogs are so unpredictable that petting them "wrong" or making the wrong noise can provoke an attack, I think I'll just kind of avoid that scenario and keep little ones away from dogs. Both dogs and kids can be safe that way.

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"Wolves, dragons and vampires, man. Draw the nut-bars like big ol' nut-bar magnets." ~evilrabbit

(snurched because one of my nutbar family members is all about wolves and another one is all about dragons...)(with apologies to surfcitydogdad)

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Llewtrah
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There is a nasty added twist to this tale.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/leicestershire/5378816.stm
quote:
The grandfather of a baby mauled to death by Rottweilers has been stabbed in an attack which left his partner dead, a family member has said.
John Brightwell, 50, and Debra Larn, 47, were attacked at home in Beaumont Leys, Leicester, early on Sunday.

2 people have been arrested, but it isn't being linked to the fatal dog attack which happened the day prior to the stabbing. Sounds like the family had some enemies.

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I saw Mommy kismet Santa Claus
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quote:
Originally posted by snapdragonfly:
That is exactly why my husband didn't permit any dogs at all to be anywhere near our children when they were babies. Because the kids might accidentally do something to make the dogs attack.

Might not be the dogs fault, but who gives a s*** if your kid is attacked and killed if the dog was just "doing what is instinctive" or not...small comfort.

If some dogs are so unpredictable that petting them "wrong" or making the wrong noise can provoke an attack, I think I'll just kind of avoid that scenario and keep little ones away from dogs. Both dogs and kids can be safe that way.

There are other alternatives that work just as well. I think when some people say it's not the dog's fault, they are saying that human supervision would have been the responsible response. In other words, there is culpability, just not for the dog.

Training is important for any dog, as well as socialization. A dog who is completely accustomed to the noises and movements of small children will not be provoked by them.

And remembering that every dog is an animal, one can simply supervise doggy interaction with small children instead of banning it completely.

It's not just a matter of petting "wrong." Small children don't understand that pulling tails and putting fingers up noses is unpleasant for dogs. And dogs often don't realize how delicate children are. Supervision keeps the dog and the child safe.

I'm a dog lover. My dogs love kids and have been socialized around as many kids as possible. I've seen them react calmly to hair pulls and such and the noises of children don't bother them. But I'm not leaving a 40 pound dog alone in the room with
a 15 pound baby, any more than I'd put the baby un-tended on a window ledge or in a sink full of water.

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Tarquin Farquart
The First USA Noel


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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
2 people have been arrested, but it isn't being linked to the fatal dog attack which happened the day prior to the stabbing. Sounds like the family had some enemies.

That might explain why they had the dogs in the first place.

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I shall baffle you with cabbages and rhinoceroses in the kitchen and incessant quotations from "Now We Are Six" through the mouthpiece of Lord Snooty's giant poisoned electric head. So there!

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Llewtrah
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quote:
Originally posted by Tarquin Farquart:
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
2 people have been arrested, but it isn't being linked to the fatal dog attack which happened the day prior to the stabbing. Sounds like the family had some enemies.

That might explain why they had the dogs in the first place.
That is what I wondered. I used to frequent a pub that had a very loud Dobie guard dog. Not sure if the dog would have attacked - the previous owners had beaten it to make it vicious and it was not a vicious dog. Luckily it was very protective of the baby (which was its pack leader's "puppy"), but the owners still didn't leave them unsupervised in case something confused the dog into harming the baby.

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Xia
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quote:
Originally posted by strange_little_girl:
Baby dies after Rottweiler attack

The TV news said the baby was dragged out of the window onto the roof by these dogs. Proof that you should always take care of kids round dangerous dogs. I doubt very much if the baby here was old enough to provoke the dogs by poking or annoying them.

You should always take care of young kids around any dogs, not just "dangerous" dogs (not sure if by "dangerous dogs" you mean specific breeds which you think are dangerous, or dogs which you know are agressive) but anyway you should supervise young children when around ALL dogs.
There is just too much that can happen. Even a friendly dog can unintentionally hurt a baby or young child. There was case where a Pomeranian killed a baby, and another where I think it was a Jack Russell Terrier chewed up a baby's foot. If these children were not left with the dogs unsupervised these incidents could not have happened. I don't think you would have called either of those "dangerous dogs."

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Llewtrah
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A perennial problem with the baby/dog interaction is that dogs will nip puppies or young dogs to keep them in order. Even when they view baby as a people-puppy, dogs behave like dogs (time humans stopped anthropomorphising them). Unlike puppies which are quickly mobile, babies can't dodge out of the way and they have much more fragile skin. The result can be a nasty bite when the dog only meant to give a disciplinary nip.

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NaNa
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I have a question about deer causing 130 fatalities year...is that cuz they include deers running out in front of cars and causing accidents? That's hardly the deers fault, I doubt they plan it. Or are deers attacking people and I've just never heard of it before?

About a year ago, my SO and I bought our house and he convinced me to let him get a dog. It was a cute puppy but as it began to get older we started to suspect that the guy at the pet store was less than honest with us about the breed. I don't know what it was, but it looked like a pit bull. (I'm no expert--it took me six tries to find the pit on that web page). Whatever it was, as it got stronger and I'd watch it slam its toys around on the ground with such force all I could think was "what if that was my son's arm?" He was gone (to a good home with no children) shortly after. Animals freak me out.

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Ink Rose
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A friend of mine's dog almost killed me once. He was a real sweetie and well trained so he didn't jump up, which was nice as he weighed much more then I. But as he was running past he knocked me over and I almost hit a sharp pile of rocks. My point is that even if you're careful and the dog is very well behaved accidents happen. Leaving a child unattended with any sort of dog can be a costly mistake, especially as they're smaller and can't move out of the way as easily.

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Lady Neeva
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No offense intended, but only an idiot leaves a toddler/baby unsupervised with any dog in my opinion.

Our "family" dog (technically mine, as I aquired her for myself and she lives in my home... but we live two apartments apart and are in and out of each others homes so much we may as well live together lol) is so laid back, sometimes I'm surprised that she ever moves lol. She's also old and practically toothless (came that way... I'm a sucker for old dogs) and she adores my nieces.

Even so... we never leave the 2 year old alone with the dog. One of the adults is always in the room. For that matter, we just recently started letting the 8 year old be unsupervised around the dog. In our minds, it's better to be TOO cautious rather than risk injury to either the child or the animal.

Really with small children, they shouldn't be left alone with ANY animal. Even if the animal isn't a threat to the child, the child can certainly be a threat to the animal. Little ones have no concept that animals aren't just self mobile stuffed toys.

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NaNa
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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With a dog as strong as a pit bill or various other breeds, even if an adult was in the room, suppose the dog just suddenly lashed out and got a kid around the throat. It could still cause serious damage or death by the time you pried the thing off.

BTW, when I did have a dog (only for about 3 months or less). I never, ever left my son unattended with it. If I was busy doing something that I couldn't be sitting right there, that dog was outside or in his cage.

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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by HotBlondeMom:
I have a question about deer causing 130 fatalities year...is that cuz they include deers running out in front of cars and causing accidents? That's hardly the deers fault, I doubt they plan it. Or are deers attacking people and I've just never heard of it before?

I assume it includes deer-car traffic accidents. Why wouldn't it? The word "cause," in this case, doesn't imply planning. Even if a deer attacked a person, it wouldn't be doing so with malicious intent -- that's a human behavior.

quote:
Animals freak me out.
No offense, and maybe you've already figured this out, but you shouldn't let people talk you into having pets if animals freak you out. People freaking out around animals tends to freak them out, too, with bad results all around.

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DakotaPride
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Myths about pit bulls are on the rise due to the popularity of the breed. It's not the breed it's self thats the problem, it's the owners who don't have a clue about the breed, or owner's who want a "bad ass" dog, and encourage agressive behavior.
I find it hard to believe that a pitbull(or any other dog) will just "snap" and attack a human or another dog.(barring illness or injury) There were signs missed or ignored by the owner. Yet the dog or breed is blamed for lack of supervision, or training.

The pit bull has no more "biting power" then any other dog it's size. No conclusive tests have been done to prove this, but from the tests that have been done, the pit ranked 3rd. Again this is a myth to promote the dangerous killing machine label tacked on to the pitbull.
I have seen myths about different breeds come and go along with the popularity of the breed. Back when Dobies were the "thing" the myth was that their skulls stop growing but their brains didn't, making them unstable and prone to attacking without warning.
With Chows, it was attacking without warning, killing for the pure joy of killing.
The key element here is ignorance on the owner's part in getting a dog they know nothing about, or having the skills to train it properly because it's the dog of choice at that time.

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NaNa
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Yes, I've figured that out. I never had pets growing up (except for rabbits in kindergarten), so as an adult I figured I'd give it a shot. I guess I just inherited that "animals are gross" gene from my dad.

I still don't think deers should be included in that study. It seems unfair to the deers, blame the automobiles.

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Lainie
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quote:
Originally posted by NaNa:
I still don't think deers should be included in that study. It seems unfair to the deers, blame the automobiles.

It's not a question of blame, it's a question of causation. If I'm driving down the road, obeying all traffic laws and using reasonable caution, and a deer runs out in front of me, and I hit it, the accident was caused by the deer. If the deer had not run out in front of me, there would have been no accident. I didn't cause the accident, my car didn't cause the accident, the deer caused the accident.

It's not like the deer is going to get points on its license.

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DakotaPride
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quote:
Originally posted by NaNa:

I still don't think deers should be included in that study. It seems unfair to the deers, blame the automobiles.

Exactly. The deer is acting on instinct, and wham, it gets nailed by a car.

A dog is acting on instinct, and wham..it's the dog's fault?

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Lainie
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Government bodies and insurance companies keep statistics on crashes for the purpose of learning how accidents occur and how they can be prevented. For those purposes, it is very important to distinguish between a crash caused by, say, reckless operation, vs. a crash caused by an animal.

Statistics on deer-auto collisions are also used by wildlife agencies to determine how deer herd size is changing, and what population controls might be needed.

Again, it's not blame. It's causation, assigned for purposes of statistical analysis.

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NaNa
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A deer is standing there or trying to run away. A dog is running towards you and tearing you to shreds. I don't care if it's instinct or not, theres a difference.

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Cervus
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quote:
Originally posted by Lady Neeva:
Really with small children, they shouldn't be left alone with ANY animal. Even if the animal isn't a threat to the child, the child can certainly be a threat to the animal. Little ones have no concept that animals aren't just self mobile stuffed toys.

One of my earliest memories is poking my finger into the ears of my grandmother's cat. The cat didn't hiss or try to bite, but a finger full of black earwax was an effective deterrent to me poking and prodding animals!

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"There is no constitutional right to sleep with endangered reptiles." -- Carl Hiaasen
Won't somebody please think of the adults!

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DakotaPride
Deck the Malls


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I was remarking on how easy it is to blame another factor when the animal is considered cute and harmless when going on instinct,
Yet a dog is blamed when it acts on instinct, and not the owner.
I was trying for flip, and got flop..sorry

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Kitsune26
The First USA Noel


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This thread got me to thinking about an event not too long ago.
My roomate at the time brought home a really emaciated chow, with a rope around her neck that had been clearly chewed through.
She had been found waundering on the side of the highway, and T, being as big hearted as she was, brought her home.
That dog-nicknamed Chloe for the time being-was so sweet and wanted nothing more than to be snuggled.
But T had to leave for somewhere, as did I.
So Chloe was tied to a 50 gallon water jug on the front porch, with water and food.
I went upstairs to tell the other roomate that there was a dog on the porch.
He went to check, and BAM! Chloe was snarling and lunging at him.
Then I couldn't get anywhere near her without her trying to come after me.
It wasn't until after I had to call Animal Control (breaking my heart and T's) that I thought about the circumstances.
Chloe had obviously come from someplace where she didn't get enough to eat and had been tied up for a while (the rope was so tangled in her fur).
She had more than likley chewed her way free, only to be placed in a situation that , to her was just the same, and she didn't want it.
Long story short (too late), just because it seems like there is no reason at the time for a dog to snap and snarl, doesn't mean there isn't one.

I still hold out hope that Chloe found a good home.

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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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The media is on high alert for bad Rotties. 2nd headline item on this morning's BBC News 24 was a Rottweiler attack on a 14 month old boy. The dog was beaten off by a hammer. I'm guessing that pretty much every dog-bites-child story is going to get airtime and there will be calls for "tighter controls".

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abigsmurf
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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I believe rottweilers and pit pulls should be subject to tighter laws but the thought of Labour introducing another law because of the tabloids makes me ashamed to be british.
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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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quote:
Originally posted by abigsmurf:
I believe rottweilers and pit pulls should be subject to tighter laws but the thought of Labour introducing another law because of the tabloids makes me ashamed to be british.

Makes me think dog owners should have competency tests as some of them fail on the basics.

Part of the problem is the popularity/status symbolism of certain breeds that look fierce and which enhance the owner's image ("look how tough I am to have a tough dog"). Many of the dogs won't have come from reputable breeders, but from AN Other who is churning out cheaper inbred puppies with no regard for temperament and the owners are incapable of controlling them.

I've seen puppies sold in markets and car boot fairs (I was surprised the latter was legal) as well as dodgy pet shops. I've been offered puppies from "well hard parents" by a bloke in the pub (sounds cliche, but I kid you not). I sometimes think the only thing missing in these poorly bred dogs is the Burberry pattern, because that's often the sector of the market they appeal to ("chavs" for the benefit of USAnians). Unfortunately, these animals can bring a well-established breed into disrepute. When I was very small, German Shepherds had a bad reputation (mum was pretty paranoid about the breed), possibly victims of their own popularity.

I don't know if it's a myth, but I was told that one of the more dangerous dogs is the golden cocker spaniel due to "rage" syndrome. A friend's landlady lost her eye to a spaniel.

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Ryda Wong, EBfCo.
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
Makes me think dog owners should have competency tests as some of them fail on the basics.
-snip-
I don't know if it's a myth, but I was told that one of the more dangerous dogs is the golden cocker spaniel due to "rage" syndrome. A friend's landlady lost her eye to a spaniel.

Yup to making dog owners pass tests.

As to cockers, it was more a "Lady and the Tramp" problem. Movie features cute dog, people want dog, don't know how to care for dog or train dog, backyard breeders and puppy mills produce breed without regard to temperment or health, dog goes to pet shop, who doesn't screen for owner for compentency in handling dog and doesn't bother to spay/neuter or enforce a spay/neuter contract.

Results in EVERY movie breed and popular breed having their most accessible lines screwed all to hell. The responsible breeders still have great dogs, but the responsible breeders produce so few dogs, that the majority of the population gets exposed to the dogs with the screwy lines.

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So many spankings! It feels so good! But at the same time, I don't care about meeting your family! - I'mNotDedalus:

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mouse goddess
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by Lady Neeva:


Really with small children, they shouldn't be left alone with ANY animal. Even if the animal isn't a threat to the child, the child can certainly be a threat to the animal. Little ones have no concept that animals aren't just self mobile stuffed toys.

Very true.
My dog growing up was a Golden Retriever that lived to be 15, which is pretty old for a large dog....In her old age, she had some cataracts, and some arthritis, and was just generally crochety. (We had her put down in the end, very sad, but she seemed to be in significant pain, and had lost bladder control)

Anyhow, getting kind of crochety...A friend came over with her toddler (1 and a half or so) niece. The niece wanted to go see the doggie, so I asked the friend if it was ok with her. "Oh yeah, she's used to big dogs, we have a couple of Rotties at home, and she's very good with them."
So I took her outside and reminded her, "Gentle, ok??"
She toddled over to Ginger, said "Doggie!!" and bent down and gave her the gentlest hug you could ask for....perfect. Then she said "Doggie again, and pointed at her....at least I think that's what she meant to do...With all of a toddler's grace and coordination, she poked Ginger in the eye...and Ginger growled at her.

This dog had never growled at a person in her life, UP UNTIL THAT MINUTE. She had always been wonderful with kids, and was alarmed if a kid that she "thought was too young" was in our pool, circling it until they got out. She was wonderful with kids, but she was old, and getting a little less patient. I'm convinced if a kid had poked her in the eye years previously (and they probably did), she would have been fine with it. It was only a growl, she didn't snap or anything, but I hustled that girl away right at that second, and promptly told everyone that she needed to be extra supervised from now on.

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"this could increase your brain power, or it could kill you..." "Increase my killing power, ehh???"

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Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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More generalisations about "dangerous breeds" following the Rottie attack:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/southern_counties/5387844.stm

quote:
Harvey's parents, Clare Carey and Mark Lawrence, have urged dog owners to be aware of the behaviour of Rottweilers ... this type of animal needs very careful handling... muzzling, I think, can only be a positive thing ... there should be further rules on Rottweilers and the training they should be given before they're allowed to be sold on to general members of the public.
However the father went onto say it was a freak accident and the dog had never shown aggression before, so i do wonder what provoked it.

Maybe I've been very lucky, but I haven't yet met a nasty Rottie. Dominant, assertive, protective, energetic yes, but so far I've not met one that is aggressive so as to attack without provocation. However I'm aware that the breed characteristics include the traits I mentioned and I adjust MY behaviour so I don't provoke a bad reaction from the dog. The only really bad bites I've had were from a Jack Russell (the bow-legged mongrel sort, not the Parson Jack Russell) and all I got by way of parental sympathy was "well you should have left a strange dog alone".

Parents, owners etc need to be aware that noisy active children with their relatively high-pitched voices can trigger a dog's hunting instinct. Also a person visiting a home where there is a dog is, in doggy terms, an intruder onto its territory and unless trained to accept visitors and properly "introduced" to the intruder (please - don't rely on the dog remembering a previous visit!), some breeds of dog will instinctively protect their territory. If they didn't we wouldn't have any guard dog breeds.

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