snopes.com Post new topic  Post a reply
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Urban Legends » Critter Country » British Mystery Big Cats (Page 2)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4   
Author Topic: British Mystery Big Cats
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Let me ask dlloyd, in all of those links you posted, is there a single picture? Or indeed any proof other than unsubstantiated stories?

I'm guessing not.

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Mrs Cake
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Mrs Cake   E-mail Mrs Cake   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Hello all,

Where I grew up, in southern Minnesota, USA, at one time cougars (aka mountain lions, pumas) were very rare and shy. I never saw one, and I am a real animal enthusiast.

Now, for whatever reasons, they are coming back and are quite a nuisance, coming into people's yards (my mother's cleaning lady, she went after it with a broom) and absconding with small dogs and such.

Southern Minnesota is by no means "wild", though not so crowded as the UK. I can just about believe that leopards, probably the most adaptable and canny of the great cats, could live in the UK. And I know they would eat rabbits -- heck, they probably eat mice too. Mice and rabbits are the default prey of pretty much all predators.

BUT the absence of lots of prints, or sheep carcasses in trees, or leopard kittens in an old badger sett, or droppings, or dead leopard bodies ... sadly, it doesn't seem likely.

I daresay that people want them to be real only so long as they are not real. You can bet your hat that if they *were* at large in any numbers in the UK, they would be hunted and eliminated. Too dangerous for a civilized land.

--------------------
"Despite the high cost of living, it remains popular."

Posts: 1 | From: Winnipeg, MB, Canada | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
Let me ask dlloyd, in all of those links you posted, is there a single picture? Or indeed any proof other than unsubstantiated stories?

I'm guessing not.

Firstly, I posted a single link.

I haven't read through all of the news stories, but have a passing interest, you tend to when people claim to have seen a leopard within a few hundred yards of your house.

Scepticism is healthy, and undoubtedly there are vulnerable people who mistake stray dogs for lions. However, there are documented cases of big cats, notably Lynx, escaping from wildlife centres. Additionally there are a number of cases where people have been attacked by big cats, usually described as being labrador sized and black. It's difficult to confuse a labrador for a big cat when it's attached to your leg.

In the late 1970s there were sightings of a big cat in Cannich, near Loch Ness. No doubt these met with the usual response. One farmer who had lost sheep set traps and, lo and behold, caught a puma. They named it Felicity and it lived for five years at the Highland Wildlife Park near Kingussie. It's now stuffed and mounted in Inverness museum.

Maybe it was a dog?

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
 -

Dog?

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The link you posted linked to dozens of stories, and i've said before I know full well animals have escaped from zoos etc, but my stance is that they are captured or die, and do not/have not started communities in the 'wilds' of the UK. Had any done so these so called 'sightings' might be more substantial than the spurious hocum they usually are.

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Some of the sightings are likely to be of animals similar to the Kellas cat...

 -

The four that have been captured are around 42 inches from head to tail. They are usually described as wildcat/domestic hybrids. Presumably hybrid vigour explains their size.

A slightly better pic...

 -

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
i've said before I know full well animals have escaped from zoos etc, but my stance is that they are captured or die, and do not/have not started communities in the 'wilds' of the UK.

Why?

There are certianly sufficient food sources for medium sized big cats in the Scottish glens and the rural lowlands. I'm sure areas like the Peak district and Dartmoor are similarly able to cope with them.

It would only take a single breeding pair to start a population, and there's no doubt big cats of all kinds are found both dead and alive from time to time. Here's a link to a Fortean Times article that details big cat sightings in the UK...

http://www.forteantimes.com/articles/167_bigcats2002.shtml

(Sure, I'm playing devils advocate to an extent)

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
(Sure, I'm playing devils advocate to an extent)
You are? [Wink]

For me, this is bigfoot territory - I won't be convinced of big cats in our 'wilds' until I see evidence of it - the Fortean Times? Give me a break, the way the media report these 'sightings' you'd think it was the serengeti out there [lol]

This country is too small for there to be so little evidence - i've trekked it's length and breadth, I've known hundreds of people, all over the UK in all sorts of outdoors professions ranging from soldiers and game-keepers to Forestry commission and National trust employees, farmers, survivalists, hikers and mounatin bikers and not one of them, ever, has glimpsed a carnivore bigger than a badger.

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
quote:
(Sure, I'm playing devils advocate to an extent)

You are? [Wink]

For me, this is bigfoot territory - I won't be convinced of big cats in our 'wilds' until I see evidence of it - the Fortean Times? Give me a break, the way the media report these 'sightings' you'd think it was the serengeti out there [lol]

I posted that largely in response to Andrew Ware's post, but included it here as it was fairly relevant (hey, there's photos [Smile] )...

quote:
Originally posted by Andrew of Ware, England:
Every so often The Fortean Times lists all the big cats sighted in Britain. It calls them ABCs - Alien Big Cats - and whilst it acknowledges there has never been any definite proof of them existing it is keeping an open mind on the matter (as it does on everything for which there is no definite proof).

I will be interested to see what the magazine, the closest thing to 'Snopes' in print I know, says on this report.

quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
This country is too small for there to be so little evidence - i've trekked it's length and breadth, I've known hundreds of people, all over the UK in all sorts of outdoors professions ranging from soldiers and game-keepers to Forestry commission and National trust employees, farmers, survivalists, hikers and mounatin bikers and not one of them, ever, has glimpsed a carnivore bigger than a badger.

I find it odd that out of the many hundreds of people I know who work in outdoors professions, none have ever claimed to have seen a badger.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
RLobinske
Deck the Malls


Icon 1 posted      Profile for RLobinske   E-mail RLobinske   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Estimating the size of an animal in the wild from a brief encounter can be difficult, and many people don't do a good job of it.

Using a personal example. The Florida Panther range is confined to the Florida Everglades and vicinity, but there are regular reports well up the Atlantic Coast. Along this area is a color variant of the Bobcat that is overall tan with no other markings. I've seen one of these bobcats under clear conditions and my first thought was that it might be a panther. It stayed in view long enough for me to clearly identitify it as a bobcat and recognize that it was smaller than a panther would be. However, I could easily see where someone could assume it was a panther if they only had a brief glimps or saw it under poor conditions.

Posts: 296 | From: Crawfordville, Florida | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
I find it odd that out of the many hundreds of people I know who work in outdoors professions, none have ever claimed to have seen a badger.
Aye but how many of them know anything about badgers? A little bit of knowledge and badger spotting is easy - in certain parts of the UK they are rampant, though it's unlikely that you'll ever 'just happen upon' badgers, they take their privacy quite seriously [Wink]

As i've pointed out exhaustively in these threads over the years, big cats are easy enough to track, they really are - if they existed, they'd be on film, larking about. We slipped into the forest on the trail of a tiger in India and came upon it in a few hours, and the animal's territory was bigger than any UK National park - I think if these trackers were brought to the UK they could quickly put to bed any rumour of big cat populations, beyond the odd escapee.

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Richard W   E-mail Richard W   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
dlloyd said:
I find it odd that out of the many hundreds of people I know who work in outdoors professions, none have ever claimed to have seen a badger.

My sister saw one the other day, running along her road in Sheffield...

(edit) Although since badgers are quite shy and not known for urban living, personally I think it was more likely that it was really a snow leopard.

Posts: 8725 | From: Ipswich - the UK's 9th Best Place to Sleep! | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
[QB]
quote:
dlloyd said:
I find it odd that out of the many hundreds of people I know who work in outdoors professions, none have ever claimed to have seen a badger.

My sister saw one the other day, running along her road in Sheffield...
I want photos! [Smile]

Edit: Of the badger that is. [Wink]

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
As i've pointed out exhaustively in these threads over the years, big cats are easy enough to track, they really are - if they existed, they'd be on film, larking about. We slipped into the forest on the trail of a tiger in India and came upon it in a few hours, and the animal's territory was bigger than any UK National park
A tiger's territory is dependent on prey availability.

Indian tigers have territories as small as 8 to 60 square miles... whatever the trackers told you, chances are they knew exactly where the tiger was likely to be.

Siberian tigers have the largest territories, at 400 square miles. Hence we know little about them.

Dartmoor is 369 square miles, Peak district 555 square miles, Lake district 885 square miles

quote:
- I think if these trackers were brought to the UK they could quickly put to bed any rumour of big cat populations, beyond the odd escapee.
I think they may have been exaggerating their own ability.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Richard W   E-mail Richard W   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
dlloyd said:
Indian tigers have territories as small as 8 to 60 square miles... whatever the trackers told you, chances are they knew exactly where the tiger was likely to be.

Well, in that case, so do we - within 8 to 60 square miles of wherever the last sighting was in the UK. And even on Dartmoor, that's going to involve far fewer hiding places than a forest in India, I would think.
Posts: 8725 | From: Ipswich - the UK's 9th Best Place to Sleep! | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
I think they may have been exaggerating their own ability.
Well possibly, they certainly exaggerated their range, but I stand by my point - big cats are easy to track, especially in such clement 'territories' as available in the UK, and with no wild 'prey' they should be a cinch to capture if they're relying on domesticated food sources such as sheep. Surely a few night vision cameras on a pen of sheep or a team of trackers with dogs could easily find any cat populations?

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
quote:
dlloyd said:
Indian tigers have territories as small as 8 to 60 square miles... whatever the trackers told you, chances are they knew exactly where the tiger was likely to be.

Well, in that case, so do we - within 8 to 60 square miles of wherever the last sighting was in the UK. And even on Dartmoor, that's going to involve far fewer hiding places than a forest in India, I would think.
[Confused]

I'm not sure anyone believes there are Indian tigers living in the UK, or that the availability of prey would be as high.

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
quote:
I think they may have been exaggerating their own ability.
Well possibly, they certainly exaggerated their range, but I stand by my point - big cats are easy to track, especially in such clement 'territories' as available in the UK, and with no wild 'prey' they should be a cinch to capture if they're relying on domesticated food sources such as sheep. Surely a few night vision cameras on a pen of sheep or a team of trackers with dogs could easily find any cat populations?
Well, Felicity the puma was caught fairly easily... chances are the larger big cats would be easy to track. Smaller ones wouldn't be that easy, there being plently of wild prey for them.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Richard W   E-mail Richard W   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm sure there was at least one tiger mentioned in the Fortean Times article, but now it wants me to register to read it. Bah - it let me read it a moment ago!

Anyway, my point was really that no matter what sort of cat it is, your argument that it's easier to track because its territory may not be as large as Jay Tea implied would work to make it easier to find in the UK too, so it doesn't really count against his argument.

It is interesting that most of the sightings are of plain-coloured animals though, not ones with distinctive spots or stripes. The unusual feature that's typically mentioned compared to domestic cats is the size.

Posts: 8725 | From: Ipswich - the UK's 9th Best Place to Sleep! | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
How small are we talking dlloyd? I thought we were discussing big cats, the 'Beast of Bodmin', sheep eaten whole et al - not a terrifying invasion of feral moggies [lol]

I agree anything wildcat in size and rarity is going to be bloody hard to track down - A radio 4 show a few years back (Corncrakes for Breakfast) set about tracking the most elusive creatures in the UK - they easily found Corncrakes, otters, lizards, adders etc but had no such luck spotting wildcats...

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Richard W   E-mail Richard W   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I heard a corncrake in Orkney last year... didn't see it though, even though I'd estimate the field it was hiding in was less than 900 square metres.

(Sorry, I hadn't a tape recorder with me.)

Posts: 8725 | From: Ipswich - the UK's 9th Best Place to Sleep! | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Llewtrah   Author's Homepage   E-mail Llewtrah   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Felicity the puma was captured so easily and was so tame that it was believed that someone took advantage of the big cat hunt to offload an unwanted, elderly and arthritic pet puma. Reports describe her as embarrassingly tame (and she liked having her tummy tickled). Though her scats indicated she'd eaten deer, her age and health indicated that she relied on a human to catch her prey for her.

Not exactly your Beast of Scotland, just a convenient way to find a new home for an expensive and illegal pet.

--------------------
Messybeast Cat Resource Archive
Llewtrah's Soapbox

Posts: 2040 | From: Chelmsford, Essex, England | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
Anyway, my point was really that no matter what sort of cat it is, your argument that it's easier to track because its territory may not be as large as Jay Tea implied would work to make it easier to find in the UK too, so it doesn't really count against his argument.

The point about the tigers was that the trackers that showed Jay Tea the tiger were looking for a large animal that has predictable behaviour that they most likely follow every day in a small area.

Tracking a creature of a smaller size with unestablished patterns of behaviour in an unknown territorial range would (most likely) be more difficult.

quote:
It is interesting that most of the sightings are of plain-coloured animals though, not ones with distinctive spots or stripes. The unusual feature that's typically mentioned compared to domestic cats is the size.
Looking through the news articles in the link I provided earlier, the cases that stand out are those where the witness had been attacked and the case where the witness' dog was attacked. The size quoted in those articles is consistent with that of the Kellas cats.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
Anyway, my point was really that no matter what sort of cat it is, your argument that it's easier to track because its territory may not be as large as Jay Tea implied would work to make it easier to find in the UK too, so it doesn't really count against his argument.

The point about the tigers was that the trackers that showed Jay Tea the tiger were looking for a large animal that has predictable behaviour that they most likely follow every day in a small area.

Tracking a creature of a smaller size with unestablished patterns of behaviour in an unknown territorial range would (most likely) be more difficult.

quote:
It is interesting that most of the sightings are of plain-coloured animals though, not ones with distinctive spots or stripes. The unusual feature that's typically mentioned compared to domestic cats is the size.
Looking through the news articles in the link I provided earlier, the cases that stand out are those where the witness had been attacked and the case where the witness' dog was attacked. The size quoted in those articles is consistent with that of the Kellas cats.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
How small are we talking dlloyd? I thought we were discussing big cats, the 'Beast of Bodmin', sheep eaten whole et al - not a terrifying invasion of feral moggies [lol]

I was talking about Beasts of Bodmin originally, but as I read more, I'm finding the large black wildcats a lot more interesting, whether they're hybrids or a melanised subspecies. Particularly since most of the cases in this area (Fife to Aberdeenshire) sound similar to this.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
ConstableDorfl
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


Icon 1 posted      Profile for ConstableDorfl     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
Felicity the puma was captured so easily and was so tame that it was believed that someone took advantage of the big cat hunt to offload an unwanted, elderly and arthritic pet puma. Reports describe her as embarrassingly tame (and she liked having her tummy tickled). Though her scats indicated she'd eaten deer, her age and health indicated that she relied on a human to catch her prey for her.

Not exactly your Beast of Scotland, just a convenient way to find a new home for an expensive and illegal pet.

And Felicity is it. The only British puma. No others.

Where's the roadkill? Cougars are killed on the roads in the US by the hundred. Nothing bigger than an ocelot in the UK.

--------------------
"Ignore the shooty dog thing"

Posts: 49 | From: UK | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ConstableDorfl:
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
Felicity the puma was captured so easily and was so tame that it was believed that someone took advantage of the big cat hunt to offload an unwanted, elderly and arthritic pet puma. Reports describe her as embarrassingly tame (and she liked having her tummy tickled). Though her scats indicated she'd eaten deer, her age and health indicated that she relied on a human to catch her prey for her.

Not exactly your Beast of Scotland, just a convenient way to find a new home for an expensive and illegal pet.

And Felicity is it. The only British puma. No others.
There was one caught in Barnstaple in the late 1970s. There was another caught in Blackley Manchester in 1976 (this one was an escaped pet)

quote:
Where's the roadkill? Cougars are killed on the roads in the US by the hundred. Nothing bigger than an ocelot in the UK.
This lynx was shot in Suffolk in 1991. It's bigger than an ocelot...

 -

Another lynx caught in Cricklewood in 2001. Again this one was tame....

 -

No doubt from me that they are all escapees from private collections.

My favourite is the Barnsley "lion" [Smile]

 -

Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Andrew of Ware, England
A-Ware in a Manger


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Andrew of Ware, England   Author's Homepage   E-mail Andrew of Ware, England   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
BBC Report on 'Big Cats' (with a video news report link)

Hardly surprising, but the remote areas of Britain - Devon, Yorkshire, Scotland and Wales - top the list of most ABC reports.

The news report also says that there are several reports of big cats with cubs.

--------------------
Andrew, Ware, England

Posts: 1709 | From: Ware, England | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Llewtrah   Author's Homepage   E-mail Llewtrah   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
quote:
dlloyd said:
I find it odd that out of the many hundreds of people I know who work in outdoors professions, none have ever claimed to have seen a badger.

My sister saw one the other day, running along her road in Sheffield...

I see badgers pretty much every day as I drive to and from work (I work early shifts). A lot are overnight roadkill, but I quite often see them running along - not across - the roads I use. You have to be out and about at the right time to see badgers (dusk and dawn), which is why people in outdoors professions - generally daytime jobs - rarely see badgers.

--------------------
Messybeast Cat Resource Archive
Llewtrah's Soapbox

Posts: 2040 | From: Chelmsford, Essex, England | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Andrew of Ware, England
A-Ware in a Manger


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Andrew of Ware, England   Author's Homepage   E-mail Andrew of Ware, England   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I have done hundred of countryside and hill walks in Britain and I have only ever seen badgers once (apart from dead ones on roads). This was at dusk on a summer's evening when a mother and her litter of cubs passed in front of me as they emerged from a wood.

I have often seen deer, sometimes quite large herds, but badgers just this once. Thus I can imagine that ABCs might be living in wild and not being seen. It is interesting that in the BBC report I linked to earlier says that most reports come from the more remote areas (Devon, Yorkshire, Wales and Scotland). With fewer people living in these areas you would not expect as many reports.

--------------------
Andrew, Ware, England

Posts: 1709 | From: Ware, England | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Llewtrah   Author's Homepage   E-mail Llewtrah   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The Suffolk Lynx (shown as a photo in this thread) has been solved to the satisfacton of police: illegal pet.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/norfolk/4830320.stm

"on Tuesday, it emerged the lynx was shot near Great Witchingham, about 30 miles away in Norfolk."

--------------------
Messybeast Cat Resource Archive
Llewtrah's Soapbox

Posts: 2040 | From: Chelmsford, Essex, England | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Richard W   E-mail Richard W   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Hmm, that story doesn't exactly clarify anything for me. Who shot it? The guy with the freezer? When was it "found in the freezer"? When was the picture taken?

quote:
The gamekeeper put it in his freezer before it was sold to a local collector, who had the animal stuffed.

But on Tuesday, it emerged the lynx was shot near Great Witchingham, about 30 miles away in Norfolk.

It merely ended up near Beccles in the area where the collector lived, Mr Bamping said.

Was this in 1991? So he must have sold it for stuffing after the police "found it in his freezer". Where was the freezer? Near Beccles?

It sounds as though it was shot in Norfolk before the gamekeeper with the freezer got hold of it. Who shot it? And they still don't actually know where it came from.

(edit) Reading again, I think the gamekeeper with the freezer shot it near Great Witchingham, and then following the unrelated police investigation sold it to a collector in Beccles.

Posts: 8725 | From: Ipswich - the UK's 9th Best Place to Sleep! | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dlloyd
I Saw Three Shipments


Icon 1 posted      Profile for dlloyd     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Llewtrah:
quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
quote:
dlloyd said:
I find it odd that out of the many hundreds of people I know who work in outdoors professions, none have ever claimed to have seen a badger.

My sister saw one the other day, running along her road in Sheffield...

I see badgers pretty much every day as I drive to and from work (I work early shifts). A lot are overnight roadkill, but I quite often see them running along - not across - the roads I use. You have to be out and about at the right time to see badgers (dusk and dawn), which is why people in outdoors professions - generally daytime jobs - rarely see badgers.
My point was a bit vague. Nobody I know claims to have seen a badger, just as nobody I knew claimed to have seen a big cat... until it came up in conversation.
Posts: 99 | From: Dundee | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
bunnyhugger
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


Icon 22 posted      Profile for bunnyhugger   E-mail bunnyhugger       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I find the "alien big cat" folklore intriguing. It seems that it is nearly always described as a panther (i.e. black). What is especially odd is that the same motif appears in the USA; or maybe it's just a Michigan peculiarity. In any case, when I was growing up in Chelsea, MI (mid-80s to early 90s) there was a widespread belief in the existence of the "Manchester panther," a black panther that was supposed to roam the neighboring town of Manchester. Now I live in Lansing, and there are also local rumors of a black panther that has supposedly been seen in the outlying rural areas. Why always a black panther? Who knows? It makes me think of the Barghest, the big black dog that is supposed to roam the Yorkshire moors. I wonder if there is any connection between the Barghest folklore and the alien big cats?
Posts: 1 | From: Lansing, Michigan | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Das
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Das     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
bunnyhugger...it's following you [Big Grin]
Posts: 7 | From: Brisbane Australia | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
  This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post new topic  Post a reply Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2