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Author Topic: Origin of "Death" Quote
Finite Fourier Alchemy
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Alright, I've heard this numerous times, but can't figure out the source.

"I am become death, destroyer of worlds."

I'd like to think of it as a Biblical reference, especially due to the grammatical oddity of its verb, but I can't be sure.

Can anyone figure out exactly where this came from?


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christmas tree kitapper
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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"I am become death, destroyer of worlds."

_____________________________________________

It is from the Bhagavad Gita. It's probably better known as what Oppenheimer said after the first test of the atomic bomb in New Mexico.

ki"I know my grammar is really bad in this post"tap


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Finite Fourier Alchemy
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by kitap:
"I am become death, destroyer of worlds."

_____________________________________________

It is from the Bhagavad Gita. It's probably better known as what Oppenheimer said after the first test of the atomic bomb in New Mexico.

ki"I know my grammar is really bad in this post"tap



Thanks! I now remember the quote being attributed to Oppenheimer.

Bhagavad Gita, huh? Is that a religious text? What context was the quote in?

Thanks again!

Alchemy


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Grumpy
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Bhagavad Gita is the core of the super-long epic Mahabharata, from India.

The context is that Krishna, the avatar (Earthly incarnation) of the creator god Vishnu, is talking to the warrior Arjuna on the eve of a great battle. (Krishna is disguised as the charioteer; Arjuna is reluctant to fight, because his own family is the enemy.) Krishna explains that Arjuna must fight because it is his cosmic duty. To impress him, Krishna shows his godly forms, including Shiva, the destroyer (because creation and destruction are linked, see). Upon this transformation he says...

Mind you, this is an incredibly condensed summary of the Gita. I think I captured the essence -- considering I've never read the whole thing.

--Grump "next time it rains" y


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domina
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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Actually it's Brahma who's the creator god, while Vishnu is the preserver and Shiva the destroyer. Those three are sort of the ruling triumverate of Hindu gods, but ultimately all gods (and everything else for that matter) are manifestations of one god. So Krishna can be Vishnu and also be Shiva at the same time. It's mighty confusing, but it's how Hindus can incorporate any number of local deities into a unified theology. I've heard some even incorporate Jesus into the system.
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christmas tree kitapper
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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You're welcome! Sorry that I didn't think to put in any information on the Bhagavad Gita.

kitap

[This message has been edited by kitap (edited 03-14-2001).]


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Grumpy
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domina,
Lucky for me, Hinduism is such a patchwork system (rather, "Hinduism" is an umbrella term for many vaguely related beliefs) that I can still claim to be partly correct. In some systems, Vishnu is both creator and preserver -- inasmuch as those duties intersect. And Brahma is considered less a part of the godly triumvirate, and more the undergirding principle of the universe.

Damn, I'm cocky for someone who admits never reading the flippin' thing.

--Grump "but I read the Classic Comix Bhagavad Gita" y


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huginn
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by domina:
It's mighty confusing, but it's how Hindus can incorporate any number of local deities into a unified theology.

Yeah, nothing like us True Monotheists. We have only One God...the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

hug"never understood why that seemed weird"inn


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