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Author Topic: Dangerous Soap
rleroygordon
The Red and the Green Stamps


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From the Aug. 12, 2000 Idaho Statesman Letters to the Editor page (Boise ID):

...there is a story involving sudden death heart attacks as a result of using the wrong type of soap in dishwashing machines.

Kuwait people in old days used water and sand to wash their dishes. Since becoming rich from oil profits, Kuwait people used washing machines with soap containing 'ionic polyglycols' which left a residue on dishes that mixed with food, causing a condition where the fats in the food would not be metabolized, as a result plaques would bu9ld up in arteries, causing sudden death from heart attacks. German doctors investigated and found that the cause was the soap, which may or may not be on the world market today.

Two doctors, one from Dallas and the other from Germany were the discoverers. The ingredients on the soap box should mention non-ionic surfactants. Are we going to see another giant corporation with its 'don't give a damn' attitude go belly up?

Frank Batelli, Boise

Just enough lack of detail. Just enough poor writing.

Sounds like a legend to me.

Has any of you in television land heard of this one yet? If so, can you give me any details or tell me where to find the info. I want to write a letter to the paper, debunking this one.


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Kathy B
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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Haven't heard this one before, but a couple of pieces of big time hooey leap out at me.

1. This dishwashing soap was sold only in Kuwait? It was marketed nowhere else in the world? Nowhere else did people have problems with it?

2. The Kuwaitis went straight from washing dishes in the local oasis pool with sand to using dishwshers with this particular soap? They didn't, say, go to an intermeditate stage of making homemade soap or doing dishes in the kitchen sink with Ivory Liquid or something? And the Kuwaitis were the only ones who made this transition? The Saudis, Omanis, et. al. are still using sand?

3. I can't imagine something that leaves a slight residue on a plate completely interfering with fat metabolism, but we'll let that go for sake of argument. The story sounds like the fat is absorbed intact into the arteries where it glues itself to the artery walls. If the fat were not metabolized at all, it would simply pass out of the gut. It's got to be broken down into smaller molecules in order to be absorbed. The plaque that can cause arterial nnarrowing is not undigested globs of beef fat; the body has done all sorts of things to the beef fat first.

4. The letter is a little garbled, but it looks like he is saying that "ionic polyglycols" (whatever in heck they are; I can't find mention of them) are the culprit, then he says look for "non-ionic surfactants" on the soap box label. Is it ionic or non-ionic? Surfactants, by the way, are chemicals that help detergents dissolve fats in water so the fat can be washed away.

Kathy "no soap" B.

------------------
The plural of "anecdote" is not "data."
Mike Quear, US Congressional staffer


Posts: 4255 | From: Sacramento, CA | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
pavelder
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Kathy B:
. . . but it looks like he is saying that "ionic polyglycols" (whatever in heck they are; I can't find mention of them). . .

Kathy "no soap" B.


A quick google search using "ionic polyglycols" will serve you up a bunch of pages like this one that refers to it as "poly(ethylene glycol)" and Jagge, Concentrate Crop Oil " a blend of special nonionic surfactants with phytobland (nonphytotoxic) oil."

The Phys.com encyclopedia says polyethylene glycol is "An ADDITIVE and compound too complex for the body to metabolize that passes through the system unchanged. Polyethylene glycol is used mostly in diet sodas to reduce the thin flavor of ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS and ape the richer "mouth feel" of sugar-sweetened soft drinks. GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE."

I'm still not sure what "ionic polyglycols" are (used with pesticides and diet sodas!?!?!?), but I think your original assessment of the letter as "big time hooey" was pretty much spot on.

pav"designed for quick wetting"elder

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"What I do is composition. I just happen to use material other than notes for the pieces." - FZ

[This message has been edited by pavelder (edited 08-13-2000).]


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sam
The Red and the Green Stamps


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rleroygordon Welcome to the board.

When Kathy can't find it, it can't be found.

Soooooo, I decided to call Frank. Yeah, that Frank. What? You never used a lookup like www.555-1212?

A very nice man, older by his voice, answered and we had a a 15 minute chat about the subject at hand and other things.

Note--Before I continue, I would appreciate it if NO ONE used this info to make fun of Frank or contact him or belittle him in any way. I, somehow, feel like Berstein and Woodward must have at some point in their lives.

Also, remember, this is transcribed from a phone conversation taken down on a small piece of paper, written in 26 different directions.....you get the idea. Can't vouch for spellings.

The source of the story is Dr. Hans Neiper(Neipeer?) the German Doctor in the story. He published a book called ? Revolution in Technology, Medicine and Society. He also had something to do with curing Ronald Reagan's cancer? He is an MD at the Paracelsus Clinic, Silversee Oertzeweg 24, 3012 Langerhagen, Germany. The Dallas Dr. is Dr. Wildenthal of the Heart Center, U. of Texas, at Dallas. Frank evidently included much of this info in his letter to the editor, but the editor called him and told him to take it out.

Frank said that he gets much of his info from an alternative newspaper, The Idaho Observer published in Rathdrum?. He also talked about the NWO, and a Weather War in Alaska, a project of the Navy/Air Force to change the weather in countries we don't like, to hurt their crops, etc. Also something called the Harp project. And the UN being tied into the NWO.

So if you do write a letter, be circumspect.

Sam"I think Cary Grant should play me in the movie" clements


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Another Aussie
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by sam:
What? You never used a lookup like www.555-1212?


Actually, I hadn't! Thanks sam, I just learned something. Although your original link didn't work (I think you left the question mark in, but I'm spectacularly e-clueless myself, so I daren't presume to diagnose). Anyway, I suspect it should be www.555-1212.com

A thought on the OP: most medical literature would suggest that there's a pretty logical link between the changes in lifestyle (especially diet) associated with sudden affluence/industrialisation of a society, and increased rates of atherosclerotic disease (i.e. cholesterol deposits bulding up in blood vessels and leading to heart attacks, strokes, etc) - regardless of how the newly rich population washes its dishes.

Cheers
Another "555-something? Isn't that the phone number of the guy on that TV show?"Aussie


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Kathy B
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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Sam, you give me w-a-a-y too much credit Blush!. Especially since I really hadn't gone after that one as thoroughly as I could have. I'm impressed by your willingness to contact the letter writer & see what the deal was. I have turned up a Dr. Kern Wildenthal who is president of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, but haven't had time to see if he is a cardiologist or has doenthe purported research. He's not listed as part of the Cardiology Dept. The University doesn't have a Heart Center; they are part of a Dallas Heart Disease Prevention Project.

Kathy "bulldog" B.

------------------
The plural of "anecdote" is not "data."
Mike Quear, US Congressional staffer


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Platina Luna
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Good work Sam!!!

Went out to Idaho Observer's site (http://proliberty.com/observer/index.htm) which proclaims that they are:

[quote} Not beholden to anybody except the people of this state and the people of this country,
The Idaho Observer has no intentions other than to provide the most intelligent,
legitimate and credible possible sledge hammer to tear down the wall of corruption and greed which keeps good people and good science separated.[/quote]

You're correct, they are definately an "interesting" group. No mention of the Kuwati soap affair, though. I was disapointed at first that there were no black helicopters, etc, but just go to the "why we're here" page and there they are!

Sigh.........

Platina "check out the contrail story though" Luna


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Kathy B
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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Platina Luna beat me to the Observer, but I'll leave my stuff about it in anyway.

Dr. Wildenthal does appear to be a cardiologist, but he hasn't published in a good 10 years. And most of his publications are about lab research.

There is, or rather was, a Dr. Hans Nieper. He died in 1999. Dr. Nieper was a proponent of alternative medicine (as one American MD said "...Neiper is very alternative.)"

quote:
Internationally famous German heart and cancer specialist Hans Neiper, MD, says, "We've known for a long time cancer cells, as well as entire tumors, lose their magnetic character and become electrically static. Entire organisms -- healthy tissues and blood -- also undergo a loss of magnetism as an effect of malignancy, helped by mucilage produced by the cancer. [If] magnetism of organs and blood is lost, defenses toward cancer decrease, since cancer cells can be devoid of any magnetic behavior."
quote:
During a visit to the United States in 1972, Dr. Nieper told news reporters:
"After more that twenty years of such specialized work, I have found the nontoxic Nitrilosides- that is, Laetrile- far superior to any other known cancer treatment or preventative, In my opinion it is the only existing possibility for he ultimate control of cancer."

The "treated Reagan for cancer" is based on this:

quote:
And yet, one doctor using ozone in his work with colonic cancer patients, Dr Hans Neiper, from Hanover, despite refusing to divulge the names of his cancer patients, stated in 1987:

'President Reagan is a very nice man.' And, 'You wouldn't believe how many FDA officials or relatives or acquaintances of FDA officials come to see me in Hanover. You wouldn't believe this, or directors of the American Medical Association (AMA), or American Cancer Association, or the residents of orthodox cancer institutes. That's the fact.'



Dr. Nieper was associated with ]Raum und Zeit (Space and Time) a science amgazine devoted to information that is beng suppressed by others.
The The Idaho Observer "is a monthly hardcopy 24-page constitutionally oriented newspaper, originating in North Idaho, but with a scope that covers all of America." The Observer does not have a search engine and not all its articles are on line. I scrolled through the list of recent article titles & didn't see anything relevant. (One related to a UL "Clinton may be suffering from aspartame poisoning")

Kathy "lost in the ozone" B.

------------------
The plural of "anecdote" is not "data."
Mike Quear, US Congressional staffer

[This message has been edited by Kathy B (edited 08-14-2000).]


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Rhapsody Angel
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
(as one American MD said "...Neiper is very alternative.)"

I'd guessed he must be into unorthodox fields when I saw his association with the Paracelsus Clinic. Any medical establishment named for Paracelsus, well...just read about him here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/paracelsus/paracelsus_1.html

Rhapsody "medical heresy through better chemistry" Angel


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sam
The Red and the Green Stamps


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I want to thank my mother, my director, and all you swell guys who make me look good. Seriously, thanks to all who went after those links from such poorly spelled info.
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