snopes.com Post new topic  Post a reply
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Archived Forums » Horrors Archive » drowning pleasant?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: drowning pleasant?
Ana Ng
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 86 posted      Profile for Ana Ng   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
i remember hearing from people numerous times in my life that after the initial shock, drowning was an okay, not to unpleasant, peaceful way to die. and before you smartasses start, apparently this came from people who nearly died drowning. has anyone ever heard this?

ana

--------------------
My great grandfather planted that tree!

Posts: 4862 | From: Brooklyn | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
BIGHUSKER
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 01 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Well, exactly how long is the "initial shock"? When I was younger, I used to try and hold my breath to see if I could pass out. It did not feel good at all. I would get paniced, tense and scared. Because of this, I could never hold my breath in. I know this isn't the same as drowning, but it's the closest thing I can relate it with.

And after a while, wouldn't the person's reflexes force them to try and breathe? At which point water would fill up their lungs. I can't imagine that would feel very good.

I've often heard that asphyxiation is one of the worst possible ways to die. I don't think it'd be a very quick way to die either.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
rossdawg days of summer
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 03 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I don't know about the pleasantness. I nearly drowned while surfing years ago when I used a strange board, wiped out and got my feet tangled in the leash. I was upside down and the board kept slapping my head against whatever was under the waves. There is a need to will yourself to get through it, the only thing I can compare to this is when you get hit in the head and you try to center yourself in time and space and will the darkness which creeps in from the sides from a blackout. *

After this, there is a strange slowness which happens and for however short infinitesminal time I felt a desire to not worry and "give up" but I can't say this was pleasant, more like "I am screwed, what can I do". Then I realized I had air left and I was upside down and saw the sun through the water around my feet and what felt like forever later I was laying on broken clam shells on the beach with a bad headache.

*(The only thing I can relate to this is when I intercepted a football and got hit low and then hit two more times in mid-air by huge linemen and before I landed and tore all the ligaments in my knee I tried to shake the tunnel vision squeezing my eyesight into darkness. I did and saw the ground. )

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Lugh the Lurker
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 95 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The idea of suffocating strikes me as one of the most unpleasant ways to go, and so it's hard for me to think of drowning as being anything other than sheer torture (I'd put it in the same category as being strangled or hanged to death--the slow, rope tightened around your neck kind of hanging, not the quick neck-breaking kind).

This topic calls to mind an old Straight Dope column in which Cecil discussed the differences between drowning in fresh water as opposed to salt water:

quote:
In a freshwater drowning, the inhaled water is quickly absorbed out of the lungs and into the bloodstream. Unfortunately, the water washes away the wetting agent (the surfactant) in the lung air sacs (the alveoli) that helps keeps the sacs inflated... In a saltwater drowning, on the other hand, the inhaled salt water draws blood plasma out of the bloodstream and into the lungs. The subsequent fluid buildup in the air sacs prevents oxygen from reaching the blood, resulting in death. In other words, in salt water you basically drown in your own juices.
Eww.

Lugh "it burns, it burns" the Lurker

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
noreen
We Three Blings


Icon 501 posted      Profile for noreen     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Anecdote:

My mother told me her father told her that he almost died from drowning; the drowning didn't hurt but the saving did. This would be somewhere in the 1890s.

--------------------
"No matter what kind of a twisted sexual mutant you happen to be, you've got millions of pals out there. Type in 'Find people that have sex with goats that are on fire' and the computer will say, 'Specify type of goat.'"

Posts: 1112 | From: Ohio | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
trollface
The Bills of St. Mary's


Icon 98 posted      Profile for trollface   Author's Homepage   E-mail trollface   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by BIGHUSKER:
And after a while, wouldn't the person's reflexes force them to try and breathe? At which point water would fill up their lungs. I can't imagine that would feel very good.

Indeed it doesn't, it's after this stage that a calmnes prevails. I drowned when I was about 4 or 6. It was nasty at first, but it really was a calm sensation after the initial panic had gone.

And, yes, being saved again did hurt, too.

Troll "water way to go" face

--------------------
seriously , everyone on here , just trys to give someone crap about something they do !! , its shitting me to tears.

Posts: 16061 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Dark Jaguar
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


Icon 01 posted      Profile for Dark Jaguar   E-mail Dark Jaguar   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Ah, so they mean AFTER the horrible burning sensation in your lungs in a desperate plea to get air, and the sudden flooding of the lungs with water, THEN you have a pleasent way to die? I've almost drowned once (pathetically with like 2 inches between my face and the surface, but it was funny anyway(for some reason I have absolutly no fear of water since then, though lately I do have a social fear of having to wear a bathing suit [Big Grin] (Woah, nested parenthesis!))). Well, that's not exactly comforting. I mean, knowing I won't feel the pain of a knife to the stomach followed by a gunshot to the kidney after a while doesn't make me feel it's a serene way to go once that initial pain is gone.
Posts: 958 | From: United States | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
abby 68
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 217 posted      Profile for abby 68   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
UMM No it's not pleasant at all. As everyone else has descibed theres a serene sort of detached, well I'll just let go & everything will be all right, after the initial shock of the "incident".I can remeber Inhaling ALOT of water thru my nose that HURT like NFBSK. [Mad] I also started to Inhale water into my lungs right when i was saved that hurt like (you know what) [Mad] , then getting saved hurt as well.
Posts: 1932 | From: Toronto | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
John Dope
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Well, I've been in water, unable to get my head up a few times and I assure you that it's NOT pleasant. In fact, drowning is among the top five on my "ways I don't want to die" list.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Temple
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jay Temple     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by trollface:
Indeed it doesn't, it's after this stage that a calmnes prevails. I drowned when I was about 4 or 6. It was nasty at first, but it really was a calm sensation after the initial panic had gone.

And, yes, being saved again did hurt, too.

Troll "water way to go" face

Unless you're Shirley MacLaine or a cat, I believe you have misused the word "drowned."

--------------------
"Well, it looks we're on our own ... again."--Rev. Lovejoy

Posts: 3572 | From: St. Louis, MO | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Persephony
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I actual heard from an ex-boyfriend (no need to wonder why he's an ex) that drowning was actually a orgasmic experience like with near-asphyxiation?
IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
the Virgin Marrya
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 1 posted      Profile for the Virgin Marrya     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm just itching to go "well, how would you know - anyone who's actually drowned couldn't tell you..."


But I think you-all have it covered - at least that almost drowning, once you get past the panic etc, is quite pleasant, which leads one to assume that, if you got that far, going the last leg of the journey wouldn't be too bad.

--------------------
Windows cannot open this file. To open this file correctly, defenestrate, then try running the file again...

Posts: 5383 | From: New Zealand | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Rhiandmoi
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rhiandmoi   E-mail Rhiandmoi   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Well, drowning doesn't mean that you die, it just means that your lungs fill up with water and you stop breathing.
SO drowned when he was a baby, but he doesn't remember any of it, or have a fear of water.

--------------------
I think that hyperbole is the single greatest factor contributing to the decline of society. - My friend Pat.

What is .02 worth?

Posts: 8745 | From: California | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Llewtrah
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Llewtrah   Author's Homepage   E-mail Llewtrah   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I had a near drowning in a swimming pool when I was 7 years old. Burning sensation in nose and lungs, gasping when pulled out. I am now approaching 40 and have never conquered my fear of water. I have to shower so that water doesn't hit my face otherwise I have uncontrollable panic. At school, the swimming lessons were a nightmare as the teachers ridiculed me - their approach was "get in the pool and get over it". I've since been to special classes for aquaphobics but never managed to swim. It was a horrible experience and means I miss out on a lot (watersports, boat trips) when going on holidays.

--------------------
Messybeast Cat Resource Archive
Llewtrah's Soapbox

Posts: 2040 | From: Chelmsford, Essex, England | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
resELution
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


Icon 1 posted      Profile for resELution   E-mail resELution   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Oh, this reminds me of a game my cousins and I would play in the pool when we were little. We would "drown ourselves" at the bottom of the pool. Warning: I'm fully aware that this was not acutally drowning, but just cutting off our air flow.

One kid would be the spotter, and the other kid would slowly let out her breath and then sink to the bottom of the pool. The point was to be laying down on the bottom of the pool on your back with as little floating as possible.

While one kid was under the other kid would count seconds, "one-one thousand, two-onethousand" until the "drowning" person came back up. The point was to have the most seconds under.

Of course we weren't expelling all of the air in our lungs (I think that's impossible to do conciously) but it was enough that we'd sink to the bottom and stay there. Then we knew it was time to go back up when we'd start "Seeing angels or having everything go grey." It was plesent in a way.

I think what we were doing was similar to the effects of "huffing" in that it limited oxegen to the brain. I'm sure it was NOT good for us, I don't advice it in hindsight either. It scared the NFBSK out of our parents.

Posts: 2286 | From: Washington State | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Bonnie
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 06 posted      Profile for Bonnie   E-mail Bonnie       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Well, drowning doesn't mean that you die, it just means that your lungs fill up with water and you stop breathing.
As Jay Temple points out, "he drowned" really does feature dying as a consequence of suffocation in water (or inspiration of water). (Similarly, you haven't been electrocuted if you haven't died as a result.) Drowning results in death; survivors experience near-drownings.

quote:
But I think you-all have it covered - at least that almost drowning, once you get past the panic etc, is quite pleasant, which leads one to assume that, if you got that far, going the last leg of the journey wouldn't be too bad.
I know we'd like to believe that the final stages (after the icky, gut-wrenching, painful horror of the first part) may be "quite pleasant" for the drowned, but I'm at a loss to find any supporting evidence for it as a general phenomenon.

It's true that some folks who've nearly drowned have reported "near-death experiences" in the throes of this predicament. These reports involve feelings of calmness and tranquility, but those sensations are typically reported for "NDEs." Further, it's unknown what proportion of those who drown and who nearly drown actually undergo "NDEs."

I'd like to think that the final stages of hypoxia and, later, anoxia cause for us only experiences that are pleasant and peaceful and help us meet our ends without fear. The literature shows, however, that while oxygen deprivation first always causes disorientation and confusion, it can also lead some subjects to experience quite frightening hallucinations as the hypoxia progresses.

-- Bonnie

--------------------
Se non è vero, è ben trovato.

Posts: -99014 | From: Chapel Hill, North Carolina | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
B Hamilton
Xboxing Day


Icon 1 posted      Profile for B Hamilton   E-mail B Hamilton   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Bonnie:
(Similarly, you haven't been electrocuted if you haven't died as a result.)

Who says twins don't think alike? I was going to come back to this thread and point out the dictionary definiton of drowning but I see Bonnie beat me to it.

My brother-in-law was a newspaper editor and his pet peeve was when someone would submit a story about an "electrocution" when the person survived. He couldn't seem to get people to understand that the person received an electric shock but was not electrocuted if he survived.

Bev "shocked that this is such a common misconception" Hamilton

--------------------
"This is my family. I found it all on my own. It's little & broken but still good."

Posts: 1338 | From: Orlando | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
TB Tabby
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


Icon 1 posted      Profile for TB Tabby   E-mail TB Tabby   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I take it this "pleasant drowning" phenomenon has nothing to do with Rapture of the Deep?

--------------------
I like to go down to the playground and watch the kids run and jump and scream, because they don't know I'm only using blanks.

Posts: 942 | From: Illinois | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
stephen
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
In my humanities class we had to read a short story, which ended with the main character drowning himself. It too described it as a pleasant feeling.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
c p
...


Icon 504 posted      Profile for c p   Author's Homepage   E-mail c p   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I almost drowned once when I was about 10 (I think I was only unconscious for about a minute or two though), and I don't remember anything being necessarily pleasant. I just thought I'd die if I moved, and everyone else thought I was already dead. Although I do remember seeing a Tetris game very vividly in my head at first when I realized I was too dizzy to stay above water...

--------------------
"dwight, what's your middle name?"
"danger."

Posts: 63 | From: Ohio | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Brian O'blivion
Deck the Malls


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brian O'blivion     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I hear burning alive is pleasant once the initial "burning alive" stage has past.
Posts: 307 | From: California | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Erin
Deck the Malls


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Erin   Author's Homepage   E-mail Erin   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I nearly drowned a couple of years ago. I was at some falls here in Manitoba where it's normally reasonably safe, but the water was much higher then normal. I got pulled into the current and dragged under. I immediatly panicked and couldn't hold my breath. I started hyperventilating but underwater and I remember how I was thinking that the water tasted like lead. Nothing about it was pleasant. I just kept thinking 'keep kicking, you can't die' and then I got pushed out naturally through the current. I got up on a rock and threw up a couple of times. I go into a panic if I get too close to rapids now.

--------------------
I am the snake. Bite, bite, bite.

Posts: 247 | From: Winnipeg, Canada | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Rhiandmoi
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 203 posted      Profile for Rhiandmoi   E-mail Rhiandmoi   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
It seems that I can find a dictionary to agree with me too.
m-w.com
quote:
1 a : to suffocate by submersion especially in water b : to submerge especially by a rise in the water level c : to soak, drench, or cover with a liquid
2 : to engage (oneself) deeply and strenuously
3 : to cause (a sound) not to be heard by making a loud noise -- usually used with out
4 a : to drive out (as a sensation or an idea) b : OVERWHELM



--------------------
I think that hyperbole is the single greatest factor contributing to the decline of society. - My friend Pat.

What is .02 worth?

Posts: 8745 | From: California | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
B Hamilton
Xboxing Day


Icon 1 posted      Profile for B Hamilton   E-mail B Hamilton   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
It seems that I can find a dictionary to agree with me too.
You might want to read it again.
m-w.com
quote:
1 a : to suffocate by submersion especially in water
The child drowned in the lake.

quote:
b : to submerge especially by a rise in the water level
Farmers drown the rice paddies after planting the rice.

quote:
c : to soak, drench, or cover with a liquid
Drown the cake with brandy and chocolate syrup.

quote:
2 : to engage (oneself) deeply and strenuously
I was drowning in self-pity.

quote:
3 : to cause (a sound) not to be heard by making a loud noise -- usually used with out
We drowned out the sound of the baby crying by turning up the radio.

quote:
4 a : to drive out (as a sensation or an idea)

He drowned his sorrows in liquor.

--------------------
"This is my family. I found it all on my own. It's little & broken but still good."

Posts: 1338 | From: Orlando | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
glitter_sufc
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I think maybe if a person was drowning after being unable to stay afloat due to exhaustion, they might be too tired to care - but drowning after cramp, or being unable to swim at all in the first place, or worse being trapped/held under water (though maybe through struggling you'd inhale water accidentally) would surely be slow and horrible.

I used to be quite good at holding my breath - my record was 1 minute 54 seconds, and after about 1 minute 20 my chest started pumping involuntarily, trying to get air.
Not nice, and only worth experiencing if you're going to impress your friends! [Smile]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
chili_kitten
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


Icon 98 posted      Profile for chili_kitten   Author's Homepage   E-mail chili_kitten   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Brian O'blivion:
I hear burning alive is pleasant once the initial "burning alive" stage has past.

You made me spit my frostie out! [lol] [lol] [lol]

--------------------
Doughnuts are my favourite dairy product

Posts: 185 | From: UK | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Hubert Cumberdale
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Hubert Cumberdale   E-mail Hubert Cumberdale   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I've always thought that the last seconds before any death that isn't instant and unexpected are usually peaceful. Of course, no one can really say how the last seconds before death feel.
Posts: 835 | From: Massachusetts | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Rhiandmoi
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rhiandmoi   E-mail Rhiandmoi   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by B Hamilton:
[QB]
quote:
It seems that I can find a dictionary to agree with me too.
You might want to read it again.
m-w.com
quote:
1 a : to suffocate by submersion especially in water
The child drowned in the lake.


And yet it does not say to die by suffocating by submersion, especially in water.
If you are not breathing, and your heart is not beating and you are this way because your lungs are full of water, you drowned. If the EMT is able to get you going again with CPR and your lungs can be cleared at the hospital and you didn't die, does that mean that you didn't drown?

--------------------
I think that hyperbole is the single greatest factor contributing to the decline of society. - My friend Pat.

What is .02 worth?

Posts: 8745 | From: California | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Silas Sparkhammer   Author's Homepage   E-mail Silas Sparkhammer   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by rhiandmoi from the deep:
And yet it does not say to die by suffocating by submersion, especially in water.



It gets worse: to suffocate also means to die. You cannot say, "I suffocated, but survived."

quote:

If you are not breathing, and your heart is not beating and you are this way because your lungs are full of water, you drowned.



No... You almost drowned...

quote:
If the EMT is able to get you going again with CPR and your lungs can be cleared at the hospital and you didn't die, does that mean that you didn't drown?
Yep...

It gets stranger yet: you can "be drowning" and live. "I was drowning in the lake, and would have died if the fireman hadn't pulled me out." Just as you can "be dying" and not die.

You just can't drown and not die, nor suffocate and not die, nor be electrocuted and not die, nor asphyxiate and not die.

Personally, of course, I'd prefer to have a nice sandwich, watch some tv, maybe phone my sister...and not die!

Silas

Posts: 16801 | From: San Diego, CA | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Rhiandmoi
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rhiandmoi   E-mail Rhiandmoi   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
well according to m-w.com, you can suffocate and not die, or suffocate and die. It depends on if you are using transitive or intransitive sense.
But whatever.
The line between dead and alive is pretty blurry at the crossover point anyway.

--------------------
I think that hyperbole is the single greatest factor contributing to the decline of society. - My friend Pat.

What is .02 worth?

Posts: 8745 | From: California | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
B Hamilton
Xboxing Day


Icon 1 posted      Profile for B Hamilton   E-mail B Hamilton   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by rhiandmoi from the deep:
well according to m-w.com, you can suffocate and not die, or suffocate and die. It depends on if you are using transitive or intransitive sense.
But whatever.

I read the definitions of suffocating and I think if you are suffocated then you must die.

But just like drowning but not being drown, suffocation is the same.

The intruder was suffocating the victim when the police broke the door down and saved her. But if the sentence is: he suffocated her---then she would be dead.

And to muddy the waters even more suffocation can be used as an exaggeration: The humidity and heat were suffocating in the closed room. Or she is suffocating me with her attention by following me around like a puppy dog.

--------------------
"This is my family. I found it all on my own. It's little & broken but still good."

Posts: 1338 | From: Orlando | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Rhiandmoi
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rhiandmoi   E-mail Rhiandmoi   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
So, using your definitions would the correct past tense be was drowning was being the past tense of to be or the action verb, and drowning being the present participle?
Or is drowing a gerund?
What is the difference between a gerund and participle?
It has been a long time since grammar lessons.

--------------------
I think that hyperbole is the single greatest factor contributing to the decline of society. - My friend Pat.

What is .02 worth?

Posts: 8745 | From: California | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
DarkDan
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


Icon 1 posted      Profile for DarkDan   Author's Homepage   E-mail DarkDan   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Off topic: Is rossdawg still posting here under a new screen name? Where'd he go?

DarkDan

--------------------
Missing snopesters | snopesters Facebook group | SLC Birthdays | What does "Bookachow", "YOMANK!" and other lingo mean?
"Gonna free fall out into nothing, gonna leave this world for a while" --Tom Petty

Posts: 3698 | From: Philadelphia, PA or >Tinton Falls, NJ< | Registered: Oct 1492  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Bonnie
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 95 posted      Profile for Bonnie   E-mail Bonnie       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
"He drowns" is the simple present. "He is drowning" is the present continuous. (Here, "drowning" is the present participle.) "Even good swimmers have drowned in calm waters" reflects the present perfect.

Similarly, "he drowned" is the simple past. "He was drowning" is the past continuous. (Here, "drowning" is the past participle.) "He had drowned" is the past perfect.

There are no differences in construction when "drown" is used transitively or intransitively (e.g., "he had drowned the kittens"; "he had drowned in the river.")

"Swim into a rip tide and you risk drowning" reflects use of the gerund; here, "drowning" is a verbal noun.

-- Bonnie

--------------------
Se non è vero, è ben trovato.

Posts: -99014 | From: Chapel Hill, North Carolina | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
tiger_splash
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I think it would seriously depend on a few more factors than just drowning itself

The desire to breathe is not caused by lack of oxygen but the buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood. This makes it possible for different ‘flavors’ of drowning. Although both deaths occur because of lack of oxygen to the brain, only by having enough carbon dioxide built up to force a breathe reflex will you take water into your lungs.

One possibility is an actual black out from oxygen deprivation. No water ever fills the lungs. About 10% of people who drown never actually take water into their lungs. This perhaps wouldn’t be to bad a way to go. I’m thinking you get fuzzy and finally black out. No pain just a realization you are going to die.

On the other hand, I’m thinking water rushing into my pink little lungs (fresh or salt water) is not going to feel pleasant by any stretch of the imagination. This would be incredibly painful… OUCH.

The blackout deal isn’t too bad. But breathing in water… it’s up there with being burned alive.

BTW Husker

“Well, exactly how long is the "initial shock"? When I was younger, I used to try and hold my breath to see if I could pass out. It did not feel good at all. I would get paniced, tense and scared. Because of this, I could never hold my breath in. I know this isn't the same as drowning, but it's the closest thing I can relate it with.”

The problem with holding your breathe is actually the breathing OUT not in. If you want to hold your breathe until you pass out hyperventilate really hard. This removes the carbon dioxide from your system. Then hold your breathe and do something very strenuous (sprint, jump). You will run out of oxygen before your carbon dioxide levels get high enough to cause you to breathe. The lack of oxygen will make you pass out (and subsequently start breathing again). I do not think this is a good thing to actually try… kids please don’t try this at home.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post new topic  Post a reply Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2