snopes.com Post new topic  Post a reply
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Archived Forums » Medical Archive » Iron Deficiency

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Iron Deficiency
ricg
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Is there any truth to the test of iron deficiency that involves drawing a line across the skin with a gold ring. The appearance of a black line is supposed to indicate an iron problem. I have witnessed the lines appearing on the same person using different rings. I have also seen no lines appear using the same rings on somebody else.

- ric -


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Edith D Bunker
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm sorry, dear, I've never heard of this particular legend but my lovely great niece had a craving for crushed ice when she was expecting her first child. Her kindly physician told her that that is often a sign of iron deficiency.

Edith


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
rosa who else
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The gold ring turning a finger black is a pretty common allergic reaction. I have it, but usually when I'm upset or sick. I asked my allergist what caused it and he said, "Beats me."

rosa debonneheure

------------------
It's clean, it's mean, it's legible. Come see what Pambytes can do for your aesthetics. Oh, and the pictures of the SLC posters ain't bad, either.
www.geocities.com/rosadebon


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
ROBERT.BAK
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by rosa who else:
The gold ring turning a finger black is a pretty common allergic reaction.

I'm a bit surprised by this — gold is supposed to be a highly inert metal...


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Meghan
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 15 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ROBERT.BAK:
I'm a bit surprised by this — gold is supposed to be a highly inert metal...

Actually, in jewelry that isn't of the best quality, it's pretty common for the gold to be mixed with another metal. That's what causes the skin reaction.

That's one reason why gold isn't appropriate for use in piercing jewelry.


Meghan "gold dust woman" Scott


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Purr Snickety
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I tend to be anemic, and I know a good many of the symptoms to look for. I have never heard of using a gold ring to test for anemia, and I'm not sure how a gold ring would produce a black mark upon the skin just because you are anemic. To me, whether or not the ring would leave a mark depends on the quality of the jewelry and your own body's chemicals. I also did a bit of searching, and I wasn't able to come up with anything relating this black mark test to anemia. Looks like this one is a dud, boys.

Purr "So, if a black mark means you're anemic, what does a green mark mean? That you have a cheap boyfriend?" Snickety

------------------
If practice makes perfect, and no one is perfect, then why practice?


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
skrap
Minnow Way Out


Icon 1 posted      Profile for skrap   E-mail skrap   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Meghan, I have a question. 2 years ago I had my navel pierced and had a 14k gold ring put in. Should I worry about a reaction after 2 years or just be glad it worked for me? I blamed it on a mid-life crises but I really just wanted to do it and freak out my daughter! skrap (She freaked!)
Posts: 928 | From: Colorado | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Purr Snickety
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skraplette2:
Meghan, I have a question. 2 years ago I had my navel pierced and had a 14k gold ring put in. Should I worry about a reaction after 2 years or just be glad it worked for me? I blamed it on a mid-life crises but I really just wanted to do it and freak out my daughter! skrap (She freaked!)

I'll answer for Meghan for now... I've got a fair amount of body piercing experience.

If you are pierced with gold, it should be at least 14 karat, most piercers won't go below 18 karat. And it should be solid gold -- not plated, as the plating is usually thin and prone to fracturing.

It's usually the impurities in gold that can cause a bad reaction in some individuals. Some people aren't bothered by it in the least, while the nickel that is often used in gold can cause allergic reactions in a surpringly good-sized number of people. In fact, the presence of nickel in *any* type of other metal can cause problems. And, other metals in gold can be corroded by your own sweat. Nickel is usually the big problem -- it's used liberally, and like I said, a lot of people are allergic to it.

If you haven't had any problems after 2 years, it's likely you won't have any problems at all. But if you're like me, your body can be pretty quirky... one minute, you're fine with something, the next, you're having an allergic reaction. If you do have a reaction, there are a lot of other jewelry options, so don't hesitate to visit your piercer and try something different. But given that you've had this piercing for two years with no ill effects, I'd say you're going to be just fine.

Purr "Bit by the piercing bug" Snickety

------------------
If practice makes perfect, and no one is perfect, then why practice?


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Meghan
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Purr Snickety:
If you are pierced with gold, it should be at least 14 karat, most piercers won't go below 18 karat.

Close, but no Cuban. 14k means it's 58% gold and 42% alloy, 18k means 75% gold and 25% alloy. Depending on how sensitive someone is, even that 25% alloy (silver, copper, zinc, chromium, antioxidant agents, etc) could cause problems.

Someone with no problems with that 25% alloy on the surface of their skin might have problems when it's in an open wound (ranging from delayed healing to contact dermatitis), which is why a lot of people cringe at the thought of gold as initial jewelry. I'd rather have ASTM F-138 stainless steel.

quote:
In fact, the presence of nickel in *any* type of other metal can cause problems.

Not quite. In ASTM F-138 stainless steel, nickel isn't an issue except for people with extreme, extreme, extreme sensitivity -- the nickel is bonded at the molecular level, the jewelry is annealed, and the finishing removes any surface nickle.

Not only do I know a thing or two about piercing, I know a thing or two about the manufacture of piercing jewelry.

As far as the navel in question, if it's fine, it's fine. People heal piercings with safety pins and alcohol. Whatever works.


Meghan "on pins and needles" Scott


IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post new topic  Post a reply Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2