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Author Topic: Useless facts, still useless
TB Tabby
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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quote:
Originally posted by Phildonnia Form PD1040 Schedule A:
I can only think of one name that does this. I am also told that there is only one country name that can be typed on the top row of a keyboard.

It's Peru, just so you know.

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I like to go down to the playground and watch the kids run and jump and scream, because they don't know I'm only using blanks.

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LeaflessMapleTree
The twelve shopping days 'til Christmas


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quote:
Originally posted by TrishDaDish:
[QUOTE]Ah! Thanks for clearing that up! I haven't read "The Merchant of Venice" in ages; I honestly remembered Portia to be Shylock's daughter. On double check, I see my memory is obviously going. (What's next? Hamlet's uncle's name is "Barry"? I'm losing it...)

I never read "Two Gentlemen of Verona", so that's why I didn't have a
clue about the other one, then.

Trish "Brush up your Shakespeare" DaDish

Portia was the wife of Brutus in Julius Caesar

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"For me, religion is like a rhinoceros: I don't have one, and I'd really prefer not to be trampled by yours. But it is impressive, and even beautiful, and, to be honest, the world would be slightly worse off if there weren't any."
-Silas Sparkhammer

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TrishDaDish
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Portia was the wife of Brutus in Julius Caesar
Portia seems to get around alot in Shakespeare; looking over my books, she is indeed the wife of Brutus in "Julius Ceasar" and is listed as "Portia, an heiress" in "The Merchant Of Venice".

I wonder if he had any other characters jumping from story to story like that.

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I would prefer not to.
My blog

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DawnStorm
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by TrishDaDish:
[QUOTE]
I wonder if he had any other characters jumping from story to story like that.

Falstaff?

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Leashes?! We don't need no stinking leashes!!

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DawnStorm
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by TrishDaDish:
[QUOTE]
I wonder if he had any other characters jumping from story to story like that.

Falstaff?

--------------------
Leashes?! We don't need no stinking leashes!!

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TB Tabby
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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The Venus Flytrap only grows wild on a 100-mile stretch of Carolina swampland.

Mozambique has an AK-47 assault rifle on its flag.

Total number of animals featured on animal crackers: 18.

Top 5 causes of home accidents: stairs, glass doors, cutlery, jars, and power tools (in that order).

Giraffes only sleep about four hours a day.

World's widest waterfall: Victoria Falls in Africa, about a mile wide.

Every second, 100,000 chemical reactions occur in your brain.

Animal with the longest tail: the male giraffe, with a tail that grows up to 8 feet long.

Workplace hazard: beavers sometimes get crushed by the trees they gnaw down.

McDonals uses 560 million pounds of beef (not eyeballs or worm meat) each year.

Bizarre phobia: Chrematophobia, the fear of money.

The sun's surface is transparent.

Winston Churchill called his wife "Kat." She called him "Pug."

Ambaric, the national language of Ethiopia, has an alphabet of 267 letters.

Norway consumes more Mexican food than any other European nation.

Fewest chromosomes: The E. Coli bacteria, at only one pair.

The Gregorian calendar is accurate to within half a day per 1,000 years.

First use of the phrase "The sky's the limit:" Cervantes' Don Quixote.

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I like to go down to the playground and watch the kids run and jump and scream, because they don't know I'm only using blanks.

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Jason Threadslayer
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by TB Tabby:
Ambaric, the national language of Ethiopia, has an alphabet of 267 letters.

Amharic has a consonantal alphabet of 36 letters, to which 7 vowels can be added (with a few being added in pairs), yielding a syllabery of 251 characters (but my count may be off)

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All posts foretold by Nostradamus.

Turing test failures: 6

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Troodon
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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quote:
Every second, 100,000 chemical reactions occur in your brain.

Impossible. There must be many, many, many more chemical reactions happening.
quote:

The sun's surface is transparent.


The sun is not really a solid object. It is made of ionized gas, which I assume is transparent, just like normal gas, since it is not very dense.
quote:

Fewest chromosomes: The E. Coli bacteria, at only one pair.


Having one pair of chromosomes implies having two chromosomes. This is false. E. coli, like all bateria, has only a single circular chromosome. Furthermore, although E. coli has much less genetic material than a human, it still has a lot more than some other bacteria.

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Fools! You've over-estimated me!

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IslandGirl239
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by StarlandVocalBand:
quote:
Originally posted by Oualawouzou:
quote:
16.. No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

[Confused] Whoever thought up this one didn't search very far...

Orange: range (duh)

Those don't rhyme at all, even monosyllabically, for a native English speaker. "Orange" is pronounced "OR-unge", while "range" is pronounced with a long "a", as in "ray".

The others are not "full" disyllabic rhymes (both syllables rhyme, as in "ever" and "never").

quote:
Silver: beaver
Purple: would "apple" count? not sure on the exact pronunciation...
Month: that one I don't know...


Would "pilfer" count as rhyming with silver? I dunno... just brainstorming...
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TrishDaDish
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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I thought there was a rhyme for for purple: The dreaded "Purple Nurple"!!! OWWW!!!

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I would prefer not to.
My blog

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Xia
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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quote:
Originally posted by bratling:
205.. The only dog that doesn't have a pink tongue is the chow

The Chinese Shar-Pei can have black tongues as well.

Not only CAN but SHOULD... A non-black tongued Shar-Pei is a disqualification in the show ring.
On a side note, it's not just their tongues, their WHOLE MOUTHS are black inside (usually) which looks pretty odd when they're panting...
Also, Shar-Pei means sandy coat-- they have 'sandpaper' fur and some people develop rashes when petting them. The fur also makes HORRIBLE splinters! I lived with a Pei for 8 months, and was constantly trying to remove skin-colored Pei-hairs from my feet...

Sorry, just adding some useless Chinese Shar-Pei facts [Big Grin]


Xia

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Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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ottercreek
The First USA Noel


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Month: that one I don't know...

Uh.....every first day is the "oneth of the month"?????....okay, nevermind...

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MissC
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Purple = turtle

C x

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MissC
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Purple = turtle

C x

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MissC
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Purple = turtle

C x

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Morrison's Lament
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
World's widest waterfall: Victoria Falls in Africa, about a mile wide.
Possibly, but it seems the tourist board for Iguassa falls (or Iguaza, the spelling seems to change) also lay claim to having the widest waterfall in the world.

--- G.

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Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by GameSkink:
If you are referring to the US customary ton, equal to 2,000 pounds, then no. A pound is a unit of weight.

However, a metric ton, equal to 1,000 kilograms, is a unit of mass.

Hmm, I was about to point out that a ton was a unit of mass too - I didn't know that the US ton was a unit of weight. (An Imperial ton is 2240 lbs).

1,000 kg is a tonne not a ton.

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Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by TrishDaDish:
103.. If you ate too many carrots you would turn orange.

Uh, no, you wouldn't. That's like saying if you ate too much celery, you'd turn green

I knew somebody who ate almost nothing but carrots for several months (I have no idea why. If you went to the same party as her you'd take a bottle of wine and some carrots) and she did start to turn orange. The palms of her hands and her fingers had a definite orange tint.

It's not like the celery comparison - the colours are caused by different substances. I guess your body breaks down chlorophyll but not carotene.

(edit) OK, several other people beat me to it!

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Hans Off
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by Richard W:
quote:
Originally posted by GameSkink:
If you are referring to the US customary ton, equal to 2,000 pounds, then no. A pound is a unit of weight.

However, a metric ton, equal to 1,000 kilograms, is a unit of mass.

Hmm, I was about to point out that a ton was a unit of mass too - I didn't know that the US ton was a unit of weight. (An Imperial ton is 2240 lbs).

1,000 kg is a tonne not a ton.

Well no, the kilogram is a unit of weight equal to the force of 10 NEWTONS of mass in 1g (normal earths gravity)

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"British English speakers point to Americans adding more syllables so that they can make even more noise without actually saying anything." Llewtrah


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Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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quote:
Originally posted by Hans Off:
Well no, the kilogram is a unit of weight equal to the force of 10 NEWTONS of mass in 1g (normal earths gravity)

Wrong way round - the kilogram is the unit of mass, the Newton is the unit of weight (or force - which is equivalent to weight, not mass).

1kg has a weight of about 9.8N on Earth.

People always talk about Kg as "weight", but in physical terms they're wrong. What I hadn't realised is that a pound (lb), and hence a US or Imperial ton, is actually a unit of weight. So the standard conversions from lb <-> kg only make sense if you assume you're on Earth.

To confuse things further, 1000Kg is also called a tonne (same pronunciation, different spelling), and on Earth has approximately the same weight as an Imperial ton.

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Robigus, Frozen Mushroom
The First USA Noel


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Very interesting. According to Word IQ,
quote:
The pound (avoirdupois) or international pound, abbreviation 'lb' or sometimes # in the U.S., is the mass unit defined as exactly 0.45359237 kilograms (or 453.59237 grams). This definition has been in effect since 1959 in the United States. [1] It is part of the avoirdupois system of mass units.

In the United States, the pound has been officially defined as a unit of mass and defined in relation to the kilogram since 1893, but its value in relation to the kilogram was altered slightly in 1894, and again to its current value in 1959 (which only differs from the 1894 definition by approximately one part in 10 million.)



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Hans Off
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Wrong way round - the kilogram is the unit of mass, the Newton is the unit of weight (or force - which is equivalent to weight, not mass).

1kg has a weight of about 9.8N on Earth.

You are of course, quite correct I seem to have got it all farce about ace!

Hans "A level physics was a lot longer ago than I thought it was" Off!

--------------------
"British English speakers point to Americans adding more syllables so that they can make even more noise without actually saying anything." Llewtrah


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Richard W
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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OK - I hadn't read GameSkink's link on the previous page either; that kind of disagrees with Robigus's post above, as it implies that the definition of "pound" above is "wrong" and you should always say either "pound-force" or "pound-mass" depending on which you mean.

No wonder NASA's Mars Lander crashed. Why would anybody use anything but SI units these days anyway?

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Dara bhur gCara
As Shepherds Watched Their Flocks Buy Now Pay Later


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quote:
Originally posted by IslandGirl239:
quote:
Originally posted by StarlandVocalBand:
quote:
Originally posted by Oualawouzou:
quote:
16.. No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

[Confused] Whoever thought up this one didn't search very far...

Orange: range (duh)

Those don't rhyme at all, even monosyllabically, for a native English speaker. "Orange" is pronounced "OR-unge", while "range" is pronounced with a long "a", as in "ray".

The others are not "full" disyllabic rhymes (both syllables rhyme, as in "ever" and "never").

quote:
Silver: beaver
Purple: would "apple" count? not sure on the exact pronunciation...
Month: that one I don't know...


Would "pilfer" count as rhyming with silver? I dunno... just brainstorming...
A chilver is a ewe lamb.

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This wrinkle in time, I can't give it no credit, I thought about my space and it really got me down.
Got me so down, I got me a headache, My heart is crammed in my cranium and it still knows how to pound


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Sunny Lea
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by zerocool:
My name can be written on one row of the (qwerty) keyboard. Any other names that can do that?

Perry, Peter, and Terry's names all can. [Smile]

And I get to add my carrot story too:

My boyfriend's brother was once carted off to the hospital, his mother terrified he was jaundiced. The doctors were baffled, until they asked what she fed him.

She's a well-intentioned woman, who is always following the latest advice in any magzine, news show etc. and had read about the positive effects of carrots on eyes.

Sure enough, she'd fed him so many, he'd begun to turn orange!

I love that woman, and yet, that story perfectly demonstrates what is wrong with her. [Wink]

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greg writes
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Useless fact: The sound of the huge rolling boulder in the opening sequence of the movie "Raiders of the Lost Ark" is a Honda Civic station wagon rolling down a gravel road in neutral.
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TB Tabby
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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Another collection of Bathroom Reader footnotes. Fell free to contest any of these.

Nuts are the most likely food that people will be allergic to.

Leaf-cutter ants can build anthills 16 feet deep and an acre square.

More babies are born in the month of September than any other month.

Take a guess: how many muscles are in your ear? None.

First TV show to win an Emmy for Outstanding Drama: "Pulitzer Prize Playhouse" in 1950.

Surprising poll result: 53% of Americans believe they're paid "the right amount."

Vitamon rule of thumb: the darker green a vegetable is, the more vitamin C it contains.

First announcer to say "He shoots, he scores!" during a hockey game: Foster Hewitt, in 1933.

The world's highest public telephone booth is on the Siachen Glacier in India.

Ketchup was once sold as a medicine.

During the Salem witch trials, two dogs were hanged for witchcraft.

The only tree from which we eat the flower is the fig.

If the average male never shaved, his beard would be 13 feet long the day he died.

Cost, in parts and labor, for an Oscar statuette: $300.

Odds of being injured by a toilet seat in your lifetime: 1 in 6,500.

Best-selling posthumous hit of all time: (Just Like) Starting Over, by John Lennon.

The heel of a sock is called the "gore."

The tomato comes in over 4,000 varieties.

About 8,000 Americans are injured by musical instruments each year.

A fetus in the womb can get hiccups.

In medieval Japan, dentists extracted teeth with their hands.

One in twelve Americans alphabetize their spice racks.

In 1797, James Hetherington invented the top hat and wore it in public. He was arrested for disturbing the peace.

Attention Pentagon: The United States has never lost a war in which mules were used.

During the 1980s, the average speed of traffic in New York City was less than 10 MPH.

Birds can't sweat...but if they could, they wouldn't be able to fly.

Researchers say: marriage makes a woman more likely to become depressed, a man less likely.

First movie shown in a drive-in theater: Wife Beware, in 1933.

Grover Cleveland's nickname was "Uncle Jumbo."

Technically speaking, a female dude is a "dudine."

Thomas Henry Huxley invented the word "agnostic" in 1869, because nhe was tired of being called an atheist.

--------------------
I like to go down to the playground and watch the kids run and jump and scream, because they don't know I'm only using blanks.

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Gg83
Deck the Malls


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quote:
Originally posted by TB Tabby:
Another collection of Bathroom Reader footnotes. Fell free to contest any of these.
[snip]
Technically speaking, a female dude is a "dudine."

I thought it was a dudette! Wasn't that what the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles said? (And if you can't trust a show about reptiles mutating in the sewers, who can you trust? I ask you.)

Regarding the carrots turning you orange thing, I can't believe nobody's linked this yet. (Site may not be safe for work, as it has a picture of a woman in a tank top, underoos, and bunny ears.)

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More Snape in drag. Seriously, man, that just improves any book. Like, A Tale of Two Cities? TEN TIMES BETTER if Madame Defarge is really Snape in drag with a bad knitting habit.

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Cervus
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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A female dude is indeed a dudette. Trust me, dude, Bill and Ted were righteous dudes. They knew their lingo. [Smile]

--------------------
"There is no constitutional right to sleep with endangered reptiles." -- Carl Hiaasen
Won't somebody please think of the adults!

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Giselle
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


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quote:
Originally posted by Cervus:
A female dude is indeed a dudette.

I prefer Dudess sounds much more regal. [Big Grin]

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Ralphie, get off the stage sweetheart.

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OTL
The First USA Noel


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quote:
Originally posted by TB Tabby:
More babies are born in the month of September than any other month.

Wait... I though September was the month in which women's pregnancies started showing... [Smile]

(Family Feud joke, in case you're wondering...)

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"I've allowed my love of gravy to distract from my prescriptivist linguistic crusade!"
-T-Rex, Dinosaur Comics

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Illuminatus
Jingle Bell Hock


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"4.. The puck in ice hockey can travel at up to 118 mph (190 km/h)."

Not anymore. New rules limit the curve of the stick blade, and lowered the speed of slap shots. For proof, watch the NHL Slapshot Competition on All-Star weekend. The best players in the world, smacking the hell out of the puck in a controlled situation, and most of them can't break the century mark.

"266.. The San Francisco Cable cars are the only "mobile" National Monuments."
Define "mobile." Don't they take the original U.S.S. Constitution out to turn it every so often?

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Tokumeowa Bakayasu
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by zerocool:
My name can be written on one row of the (qwerty) keyboard. Any other names that can do that?

Hal
Galahad
Dag
Mznvbcx

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Phildonnia 2
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by TB Tabby:
The Gregorian calendar is accurate to within half a day per 1,000 years.

More precisely, to one day every 3225 years.

(The average year length is now 365.24219 solar days. The Gregorian Calendar averages 365.2425) The difference is about 26 seconds per year.

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Delta-V
Xboxing Day


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quote:
Originally posted by Robigus, Crocodile Tears:
Very interesting. According to Word IQ,
quote:
The pound (avoirdupois) or international pound, abbreviation 'lb' or sometimes # in the U.S., is the mass unit defined as exactly 0.45359237 kilograms (or 453.59237 grams). This definition has been in effect since 1959 in the United States. [1] It is part of the avoirdupois system of mass units.


Which is why it's important to differentiate between pound-mass (lb, lbm or #) and pound-force (lbf). Although it's sometimes more convienent to use slugs as the unit of mass.
To make things more confusing, the Japanese use Kilograms as a unit of force...which is why my boost controller in my car reads manifold pressure in Kilograms per square Millimeter (KG/mm^2).

--------------------
"My neighbor asked why anyone would need a car that can go 190 mph. If the answer isn't obvious, and explaination won't help." - Csabe Csere

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