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Author Topic: "Facts" to debunk
Schnervel
The Red and the Green Stamps


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I know we've done some of these before, and I know right off the bat that some aren't true, most notably the one about ring around the rosie, but Its fun to debunk these things.

quote:
1. The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time television were Fred and Wilma Flintstone.

2. Coca-Cola was originally green.

3. Every day more money is printed for monopoly than the US Treasury.

4. Men can read smaller print than women; women can hear better.

5. The state with the highest percentage of people who walk to work: Alaska.

6. The percentage of Africa that is wilderness: 28%
-- now get this...

7. The percentage of North America that is wilderness: 38%

8. The cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven:
$6,400

9. The average number of people airborne over the US any given hour: 61,000.

10. Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.

11. The world's youngest parents were 8 and 9 and lived in China in 1910.

12. The youngest pope was 11 years old.

13. The first novel ever written on a typewriter: Tom Sawyer

14. That San Francisco Cable cars are the only mobile National Monuments.

15. Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great
king from history:
Spades - King David
Hearts - Charlemagne
Clubs - Alexander the Great
Diamonds - Julius Caesar

16. 111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

17. If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle. If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.

18. Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th; John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn't added until 5 years later.

19. "I am." is the shortest complete sentence in the English
language.

20. Hershey's Kisses are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it's kissing the conveyor belt.

21. No NFL team which plays its home games in a domed stadium has ever won a Super Bowl.

22. The only two days of the year in which there are no professional sports games (MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL) are the day before and the day after the Major League All-Star Game.

23. The nursery rhyme "Ring Around the Rosey" is a rhyme about the plague. Infected people with the plague would get red circular sores ("Ring around the rosey..."); these sores would smell very bad, so common folks would put flowers on their bodies somewhere (inconspicuously) so that they would cover the smell of the sores ("...a pocket full of posies..."). People who died from the plague would be burned so as to reduce the possible spread of the disease ("...ashes, ashes, we all fall down!")

Q. What occurs more often in December than any other month?
A. Conception.

Q. What separates "60 Minutes," on CBS from other TV shows?
A. No theme song.

Q. Half of all Americans live within 50 miles of what?
A. Their birthplace.

Q. What is the most popular private boat name?
A. Obsession

Q. If you were to spell out numbers, how far would you have
to go until you would find the letter "A"?
A. One thousand

Q. What do bullet proof vests, fire escapes, windshield
wipers, and laser printers all have in common?
A. All invented by women.

Q. What is the only food that doesn't spoil?
A. Honey

Q. What day are more collect calls made on than any other
day of the year?
A. Father's Day

Q. What trivia fact about Mel Blanc (voice of Bugs Bunny) is the most ironic?
A. He was allergic to carrots.

Q. What is an activity performed by 40% of all people at a party?
A. Snoop in your medicine cabinet.


Schnervel


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The Exorcist
The Red and the Green Stamps


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21. No NFL team which plays its home games in a domed stadium has ever won a Super Bowl.


The Rams. this past January are 1.


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Dr. Winston O'Boogie
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Just off the top of my head,.....

quote:
15. Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great
king from history:
Spades - King David
Hearts - Charlemagne
Clubs - Alexander the Great
Diamonds - Julius Caesar


false

quote:
16. 111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

true (duh).

quote:
17. If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle. If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.

false

quote:
19. "I am." is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.

No.

quote:
21. No NFL team which plays its home games in a domed stadium has ever won a Super Bowl.

Used to be true. The St. Louis Rams won last year while playing their games in the TWA dome.

quote:
22. The only two days of the year in which there are no professional sports games (MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL) are the day before and the day after the Major League All-Star Game.

Kinda true. None of the top four American sports leagues schedules games the day before or after their own All-Star game. Baseball is the only one where the All-Star game isn't in the middle of another sport's season. If you include Soccer in there, this is no longer true.

quote:
23. The nursery rhyme "Ring Around the Rosey" is a rhyme about the plague. Infected people with the plague would get red circular sores ("Ring around the rosey..."); these sores would smell very bad, so common folks would put flowers on their bodies somewhere (inconspicuously) so that they would cover the smell of the sores ("...a pocket full of posies..."). People who died from the plague would be burned so as to reduce the possible spread of the disease ("...ashes, ashes, we all fall down!")

False. (do I even need to include this one?)

PT "90% of statistics are made-up" Vroman
(eddited to fix UBB stuff)
------------------
The large print givith, and the small print taketh away
Tom Waites, Step Right Up

[This message has been edited by PTVroman (edited 12-08-2000).]


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Hacker Barbie
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by Schnervel:
I know we've done some of these before, and I know right off the bat that some aren't true, most notably the one about ring around the rosie, but Its fun to debunk these things.
Schnervel


Oh, goody. This is fun. For some reason the "quote user" thing didn't quote the actual ULs, so I'll just describe them here.

First of all, 111,111,111*111,111,111 is 12345678987654321. Or at least that's what Maple spit out at me. So that one's true.
Slightly OT, but if you multiply any 2-digit number by 11, just add the two digits, and it'll be the middle number. The first and last digits are the first and second digits. So 23 * 11 is 253. Notice that 2 + 3 is five. Duh.

Ok, about the youngest parents. I've always thought that the youngest mother was 5 and lived in Thailand. The father was in his thirties and refused to identify himself to the press. I'm too lazy to run a search, but I'm pretty sure of this.

I've heard the ring-around-the-rosie thing so many times. It's even been in my World History book in 7th grade. Even though it probably doesn't date back to the plague, it could have been inspired by it.

Men can read smaller print and women hear better. I don't know about this one. I can't find anywhere that men have better eyesight, but I've noticed that more women wear glasses. So I guess it could be true. And there was a special on the Learning Channel about how women use their whole brain to hear and men use half. So judge for yourself on the hearing thing.

About the wilderness: We have Canada and Alaska that have very low population densities when you get away from the cities. So that could account for the wilderness. I'm not sure of the percentages, though.

Raising a medium-sized dog: Well, I can't say anything about a dog, but my 12-year-old cat has quite hefty vet bills every year. And when you factor in the cost of food, it could quite possibly be around $6,000. I'm guessing the dog would be similar.

And the novel written on a typewriter: That should read first "famous" novel written on a typewriter. I'm sure plenty of novels were written on one before Tom Sawyer, but never "made it". Sad, isn't it?

Hacker "is No! a sentence?" Barbie


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Kiwibird
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Hacker Barbie:
[QUOTE]

I've heard the ring-around-the-rosie thing so many times. It's even been in my World History book in 7th grade. Even though it probably doesn't date back to the plague, it could have been inspired by it.


Er, NO! Sorry. The best FAQ I know on it
is This one by folklorist Ian Munro. The "play-party" explanation works really well and doesn't have all the problems associated with it suffered by the rest of the explanations.

And remember, much of what was in your school history books was dead wrong anyway!

------------------
Kiwibird
It's the bird, not the fruit!
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Kiwibird
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Q. What is the only food that doesn't spoil?
A. Honey

Depends on your definition of "spoil". Honey crystallizes, and I've seen people who refused to eat crystallized honey or referred to it as "spoiled". Of course, there are people who think "bloomed" chocolate (with a little greyness on the surface where either the sugar or cocoa butter has risen to the top) is spoiled too. Food ignorance abounds!

------------------
Kiwibird
It's the bird, not the fruit!
The Kiwi Bird Page

[This message has been edited by Kiwibird (edited 12-12-2000).]


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Gabriel
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Originally posted by Schnervel:

Q.What trivia fact about Mel Blanc(voice of Bugs Bunny) is the most ironic?
A.He was allergic to carrots.

Untrue, but not completely. Mel Blanc actually hated carrots, and would spit them into a bucket everytime he had to chew one for a voiceover. Still pretty ironic.

Q. If you were to spell out numbers, how far would you have
to go until you would find the letter "A"?
A. One thousand

I tried this myself, and despite human error, I'm pretty sure it's correct.

17. If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle. If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
I first heard about this UL from my grandfather when I was about 8 or 9, and he maintained that it was untrue. I saw a debunking of this on TV about a year ago. I think it was either on the History Channel or Learning Channel.

Gabriel "You can use statistics to prove anything. 14% of all people know that."


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Chava
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
4. Men can read smaller print than women; women can hear better.

This would be because the women are too vain to wear bifocals and the men are too macho to wear hearing protection when they are out shooting.

quote:
Q. What is the only food that doesn't spoil?
A. Honey

I think other forms of sugar would qualify. If crystalized honey doesn't count as "spoiled" then neither would lumpy sugar.

Chava


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Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


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If I spell out numbers, I hit an "a" in "one hundred and one." That's the way I say it, so that's the way I'd spell it.

"No" isn't a sentence; if it were, then a shorter one would be, "I," a similar valid answer to a question. (Gawrsh, I still remember how to diagram sentences!)

Silas Sparkhammer

------------------
"...With trembling heart and failing nerve, cried, 'I approve, without reserve!'"


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noreen
We Three Blings


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quote:
Originally posted by Silas Sparkhammer:
If I spell out numbers, I hit an "a" in "one hundred and one." That's the way I say it, so that's the way I'd spell it.

"No" isn't a sentence; if it were, then a shorter one would be, "I," a similar valid answer to a question. (Gawrsh, I still remember how to diagram sentences!)

Silas Sparkhammer



"one hundred and one" = "100.1"


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Chava
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quote:
"one hundred and one" = "100.1"

If this is meant to be the check-writing convention where everything after the and is supposed to be cents, it would be $100.01. But even then I think you are supposed to write the word cents.

How about 21? There's a convention (admittedly rather antiquated) of calling it "one and twenty".

Chava
How many blackbirds were in that pie?


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Cynestria
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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quote:
Originally posted by Chava:
If this is meant to be the check-writing convention where everything after the [b]and is supposed to be cents, it would be $100.01. But even then I think you are supposed to write the word cents.[/B]

I've never seen anyone write the word cents on a check...


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Chava
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
I've never seen anyone write the word cents on a check...

Actually, I do. But you're right. Most people write the cents in figures followed by /100 or equivalent. I suppose you could write "one hundred and ninety-nine" and hope that the fact that you wrote 100.99 in the figures space would make it clear what you meant (unless you make your zeros and nines a lot alike, which is not uncommon).

I just thought it wasn't really clear that "one hundred and one" clearly meant one hundred plus one of any particular fractional unit. Unless you specify "one tenth" or "one raspberry", the only clear interpretation is "one of whatever you also had one hundred of".

Chava


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ROBERT.BAK
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quote:
Originally posted by Chava:
I just thought it wasn't really clear that "one hundred and one" clearly meant one hundred plus one of any particular fractional unit. Unless you specify "one tenth" or "one raspberry", the only clear interpretation is "one of whatever you also had one hundred of".

I know that in the US, 101 (for instance) is "one hundred one", because an Asimov story (1 to 999) hinged on this fact. Unfortunately for the story, however, here in the UK 101 is "one hundred and one".


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huginn
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I think "one hundred one" is considered the formally correct spelling in the US, although "one hundred and one" is more common in general usage. I haven't heard anyone yet refer to "One Hundred One Dalmations." Of course, I think that movie is supposed to take place in England...

hug"count on it"inn


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Chava
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
I think "one hundred one" is considered the formally correct spelling in the US...

Actually, you could make a case that the formally correct spelling in the US is 101. My ancient memory of the American Physical Society style manual is that it calls for whole numbers less than (or equal) ten to be spelled out, others written in figures. I don't remember what other authorities like Strunk & White have to say on the subject.

One of my elementary school teachers did make a big deal about leaving out the and, at least if you were writing out a monetary amount on the grounds that and was the same as a decimal point (see posts above).

Chava


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honeylaser
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2. Coca-Cola was originally green. http://www.snopes2.com/cokelore/green.htm

3. Every day more money is printed for monopoly than the US Treasury.
This Monopoly Trivia Site says there are 50 billion Monopoly $$ printed per year.. any got access to the US Treaury website?

4. Men can read smaller print than women; women can hear better.
? probably..

6. The percentage of Africa that is wilderness: 28%
-- now get this...

7. The percentage of North America that is wilderness: 38%

This doesn't sound right at all.. but it could be true. I couldn't find any resources.

8. The cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven:
$6,400

A recent show here in Kiwiland called "It's your money" put the cost of raising at dog until 15 at about $15,000 NZ..

9. The average number of people airborne over the US any given hour: 61,000.
Last time I heard this it was airborne over the world..

10. Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.
From http://www.urbanlegends.com/misc/old_wives_tales.html
"Is fish brain food? It depends on whether there is a zinc deficiency in the diet, according to "Food - Your Miracle Medicien" by Jean Carper (Harper Collins, 1993). The book mentions a study done at the U of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston that found a marginal lack of zinc "can mildly impair mental functioning, including memory." The study said that when women with a slight zinc deficiency ate adequate amounts of zinc, their recall of words jumped 12 % and their recall of visual design jumped 17%."

11. The world's youngest parents were 8 and 9 and lived in China in 1910.
from http://www.ulib.org/webRoot/Books/_Gutenberg_Etext_Books/etext96/aacom10.txt
I would have given just the URL but it's a bloody huge page

quote:
"...Molitor gives an instance of precocious pregnancy in a child of
eight. It was probably the same case spoken of by Lefebvre and
reported to the Belgium Academy: A girl, born in Luxemborg, well
developed sexually, having hair on the pubis at birth, who
menstruated at four, and at the age of eight was impregnated by a
cousin of thirty-seven, who was sentenced to five years'
imprisonment for seduction. The pregnancy terminated by the
expulsion of a mole containing a well-characterized human embryo.
Schmidt's case in 1779 was in a child who had menstruated at two,
and bore a dead fetus when she was but eight years and ten months
old. She had all the appearance and development of a girl of
seventeen. Kussmaul gives an example of conception at eight. Dodd
speaks of a child who menstruated early and continued up to the
time of impregnation. She was a hard worker and did all her
mother's washing. Her labor pains did not continue over six
hours, from first to the last. The child was a large one,
weighing 7 pounds, and afterward died in convulsions. The
infant's left foot had but 3 toes. The young mother at the time
of delivery was only nine years and eight months old, and
consequently must have been impregnated before the age of nine.
Meyer gives an astonishing instance of birth in a Swiss girl at
nine. Carn describes a case of a child who menstruated at two,
became pregnant at eight, and lived to an advanced age. Ruttel
reports conception in a girl of nine, and as far north as St.
Petersburg a girl has become a mother before nine years. The
Journal de Scavans, 1684, contains the report of the case of a
boy, who survived, being born to a mother of nine years.

Beck has reported an instance of delivery in a girl a little over
ten years of age. There are instances of fecundity at nine years
recorded by Ephemerides, Wolffius, Savonarola, and others.
Gleaves reports from Wytheville, Va., the history of what he
calls the case of the youngest mother in Virginia --Annie H.--who
was born in Bland County, July 15, 1885, and, on September 10,
1895, was delivered of a well-formed child weighing 5 pounds. The
girl had not the development of a woman, although she had
menstruated regularly since her fifth year. The labor was short
and uneventful, and, two hours afterward, the child-mother wanted
to arise and dress and would have done so had she been permitted.
There were no developments of the mammae nor secretion of milk.
The baby was nourished through its short existence (as it only
lived a week) by its grandmother, who had a child only a few
months old. The parents of this child were prosperous,
intelligent, and worthy people, and there was no doubt of the
child's age. "Annie is now well and plays about with the other
children as if nothing had happened." Harris refers to a Kentucky
woman, a mother at ten years, one in Massachusetts a mother at
ten years, eight months, and seventeen days, and one in
Philadelphia at eleven years and three months. The first case was
one of infantile precocity, the other belonging to a much later
period, the menstrual function having been established but a few
months prior to conception. All these girls had well-developed
pelves, large mammae, and the general marks of womanhood, and
bore living children."


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BlueAloe
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
5. The state with the highest percentage of people who walk to work: Alaska.

I most seriously doubt this is true. I live in Alaska, and almost everyone I know drives to work. There's people who ride their bikes to work, and in villages they use snowmachines, fourwheelers, dog teams, ect...but I doubt our percentage of people who walk to work is higher than anywhere else's.


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Count Crapula
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Schnervel:
19. "I am." is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.

Wrong. There are three, take your pick.

Be!
Do!
Go!

[edit to make the sentences sound less, umm, angry]

[This message has been edited by Count Crapula (edited 12-14-2000).]


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Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


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re percent of land "wilderness," what sort of measurement is used? No road within x miles? No human habitation or construction or improvement (well, wall, etc.) within x miles? (Are there ANY meaningful peaks or hills that are as yet unclimbed?) There are so many different subtle gradations of "wilderness." In the (very few!) times I've flown, I've looked down on thousands of square miles of Nobody's Desert, criss-crossed by dune-buggy trails that peter out into rabbit trails. Wilderness? My papa has free range cattle that roam over land that has never felt the touch of plough, harrow, or scythe in all history: is it wilderness, or is it "developed" since it's "in use?" What about the Grand Canyon or Yellowstone Park: wilderness, or tourist developments?

From what I can see in maps, I'd say more than 50% of the U.S. is "wilderness," and maybe as much as 75%.

Silas Sparkhammer

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"...With trembling heart and failing nerve, cried, 'I approve, without reserve!'"


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honeylaser
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quote:
wil·der·ness (wldr-ns)
n.

An unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition, especially:
A large wild tract of land covered with dense vegetation or forests.
An extensive area, such as a desert or an ocean, that is barren or empty; a waste.
A piece of land set aside to grow wild.
Something characterized by bewildering vastness, perilousness, or unchecked profusion: the wilderness of the city; the wilderness of counterespionage; a wilderness of voices.



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Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


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Honeylaser gives a "description" of wilderness, but not a "measurement" of it. Heck, "a piece of land, set aside to grow wild," describes nearly half of the City of San Diego. The other descriptions refer to "extensive area" or "large tract," obviously intending to exclude my back yard, which otherwise clearly qualifies...

Well, descriptions are nice, but we all know what a wilderness "feels" like. I want to know how to measure it. Is the Grand Canyon a wilderness? Should we add the area of the Great Salt Lake? What about beaches, such as Miami Beach: certainly "uncultivated."

I just don't see how they can claim that only 38% of the U.S. is wilderness: it looks like a lot more to me when I mark up a map.

(The more, the better, sez I!)

Silas Sparkhammer


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Jaime Vargas
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quote:
Originally posted by huginn:
I think "one hundred one" is considered the formally correct spelling in the US, although "one hundred and one" is more common in general usage. I haven't heard anyone yet refer to "One Hundred One Dalmations." Of course, I think that movie is supposed to take place in England...

It is the first time I've ever seen that spelling. Of course you know Europeans are taught British English.

(edited to change a horrid typo)
Jaime

[This message has been edited by Jaime Vargas (edited 12-21-2000).]


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Fallom
The Red and the Green Stamps


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No! Is an interjection, and I is a pronoun. Do is a verb (helping I think). Don't sentences have to have at least 1 noun and 1 predicate?

-Fallom "Trying to sound smart"


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Chava
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quote:
Don't sentences have to have at least 1 noun and 1 predicate?

Not if one of them is understood. Imperatives (Go!) always have an understood subject of You.

I. could be a sentence with an understood predicate if preceding conversation made it clear what the predicate is. Here's an example from literature:

quote:
Who will help me plant the wheat?
Not I.

Only English has the bizarre concept of "helping verbs". Do can be a full-fledged verb (as can other helping verbs):

quote:
I do my duty to my country.

Chava


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Dan the Seeker
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Ahem...

Bookachow!!!

1. The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time television were Fred and Wilma Flintstone.

FALSE
http://www.snopes2.com/radiotv/tv/marykay.htm

--Dan "That's the first time I've gotten to say that..." A.


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theangryQ
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Hacker Barbie:

Men can read smaller print and women hear better. I don't know about this one. I can't find anywhere that men have better eyesight, but I've noticed that more women wear glasses. So I guess it could be true. And there was a special on the Learning Channel about how women use their whole brain to hear and men use half. So judge for yourself on the hearing thing.


I don't know about the hearing thing, but I'm pretty sure that women have better peripheral vision than men and see more shades of red.


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Ryan's Privates
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Original Quote

No! Is an interjection, and I is a pronoun. Do is a verb (helping I think). Don't sentences have to have at least 1 noun and 1 predicate?
-Fallom "Trying to sound smart"


Check your grammer Fallom. Shouldn't that be I 'AM' a pronoun?

Ryan's "Pi are round; Cake are squared" Privates

[This message has been edited by Ryan's Privates (edited 01-06-2001).]


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ashj
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by BlueAloe:
I most seriously doubt this is true. I live in Alaska, and almost everyone I know drives to work. There's people who ride their bikes to work, and in villages they use snowmachines, fourwheelers, dog teams, ect...but I doubt our percentage of people who walk to work is higher than anywhere else's.


Since you live in Alaska maybe you can debunk or verify this one: What state has the largest number of outhouses? Alaska!
Someone told me this and reasoned it was because the ground was frozen most of the year and it was hard to bury pipes for indoor plumbing. This seemed absurd to me (I mean what about the Alaska Pipeline, for God's sake) And I assume most of Canada has indoor plumbing. But I have never found any stat to debunk.
This person also said that Hawaii was the number one consumer of Spam in the world. Don't know about that either.

ash "spam, spam, spam, spam...spam, spam, spam, spam" j


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Andyboy
The Red and the Green Stamps


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-And I assume most of Canada has indoor plumbing.-

Are you for real? Of course we have indoor plumbing, do you seriously expect us to leave our Igloos to take a pee?

P.S. The Alaskan Pipline is ABOVE ground.


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Chava
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
What state has the largest number of outhouses? Alaska!

Is that per capita or absolute? And does it count only home facilities or does it include Forest Service outhouses and porta-potties?

quote:
Hawaii was the number one consumer of Spam in the world.

I think this is true or nearly so. It's certainly a large consumer of Spam. But it's strictly an urban legend that the reason is that it's the commercial food that tastes the most like Captain James Cook.

Chava


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ashj
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Andyboy:

-And I assume most of Canada has indoor plumbing.-

Are you for real? Of course we have indoor plumbing, do you seriously expect us to leave our Igloos to take a pee?


I was being facetious. But the logic my friend used (that the ground in Alaska was so frozen you couldn't dig to lay pipes for indoor plumbing) would also apply to Canada,and I know Canadians have indoor plumbing. That's why I thought it might be an Urban Legend...sorry if that wasn't clear. Would never want to offend. I'm from the South and we get all kinds of stereotypes thrown at us and I'd hate for you to think I was doing the same.
(As for the Alaskan pipeline thing...that was me having a "DUH" moment.)

ashj


[This message has been edited by ashj (edited 01-18-2001).]


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ashj
The Red and the Green Stamps


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quote:
Originally posted by Chava:

Is that per capita or absolute? And does it count only home facilities or does it include Forest Service outhouses and porta-potties?

See now....if I could answer that, it would mean my friend has actual sources to back up her claim. It just sorta "made sense" to her so she passes her "factoid" along.

ash "just had to use this smilie" j

[This message has been edited by ashj (edited 01-18-2001).]


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Muridae
Deck the Malls


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quote:
Originally posted by ashj:

This person also said that Hawaii was the number one consumer of Spam in the world. Don't know about that either.

ash "spam, spam, spam, spam...spam, spam, spam, spam" j


According to the official Spam website Hawaii is the state that eats the most Spam, but I believe Guam eats the most in the world.
http://www.spam.com/sp/sp_fq.htm

-- M "spam spam eggs and ham"


Posts: 305 | From: Chicago | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
dewey
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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quote:
Originally posted by ashj:
I was being facetious. But the logic my friend used (that the ground in Alaska was so frozen you couldn't dig to lay pipes for indoor plumbing) would also apply to Canada,and I know Canadians have indoor plumbing.
[This message has been edited by ashj (edited 01-18-2001).]

Alaska is actually at approximately the same latitude as the Northwest Territories and I have always assumed that most Canadians live south of there. For that matter I have a hunch that the majority of Canadians live south of Seattle, Washington, but that is only a guess.

dewey


Posts: 2413 | From: Massachusetts | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
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