snopes.com Post new topic  Post a reply
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Urban Legends » Religion » Dianetics/Scientology (Page 1)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   
Author Topic: Dianetics/Scientology
one_mans_conspiracy
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 104 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I am curious about a story I have heard many times at Science Fiction conventions all over the US.
The gist of it is that L. Ron Hubbard, who was first known for writing SF in the "golden age" of the genre, invented Dianetics and later Scientology as the result of a bet.
Supposedly, the bet was with editor John W. Campbell that Hubbard could create a religion and get people to follow it.
Has anyone ever heard of this?

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Tootsie Plunkette
Buy a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella


Icon 214 posted      Profile for Tootsie Plunkette   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I have heard that story, too. But I have no idea if there's any truth in it.

--------------------
--Tootsie

Posts: 5017 | From: Greater Seattle | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
one_mans_conspiracy
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Of course, the paranoid in me wants to think that the enormous legal arm of the Church of Scientology goes around and quashes this rumor with threats of litigation whenever anyone demonstrates any proof.

Reality is probably that nobody really cares what a bunch of SF fans think.

Loved your profile, am working on costumes right now for a local SF/Fantasy/Horror con that this year occurs on Halloween weekend.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
one_mans_conspiracy
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Found a reference to this story at http://tafkac.org/religion/hubbard_heinlein_bet.html
IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
I'mNotDedalus
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 303 posted      Profile for I'mNotDedalus   Author's Homepage   E-mail I'mNotDedalus   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
The Heinlein bet is generally considered to be false. However, there are a number of Hubbard's associates who have claimed that he did make remarks on the order of, "The best way to get rich is to create a religion" etc:

quote:
While the often-cited rumor that Hubbard made a bar bet with Robert Heinlein that he could start a cult is almost certainly false, others have claimed direct knowledge that during 1949 Hubbard did make statements to other people that starting a religion would be a good way to make money.

Writer and publisher Lloyd Arthur Eshbach, for example, reported Hubbard saying "I'd like to start a religion. That's where the money is." Writer Theodore Sturgeon reported that Hubbard made a similar statement at the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society. Likewise, writer Sam Moskowitz reported in an affidavit that during an Eastern Science Fiction Association meeting, Hubbard had said "You don't get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion."

The Church of Scientology denies that Hubbard ever made any such statement, and has sued at least one publisher, the German magazine Stern, for publishing claims that he did (Stern won the lawsuit). Members hold that the truth or falsity of such claims is irrelevant in judging whether the church meets their spiritual needs.

The Wikipedia article also cites a suspicious letter the FBI uncovered "during its raid on Scientology headquarters," where Hubbard mentions the "religion angle" of the budding organization.

I still don't know what to make of the Church of Scientology...often, I try to compare it to the aristocratic cults of Apollo. It's quite easy to laugh at some of Scientology's doctrines: the stories of Xenu, implants, etc. Often, I imagine Hubbard having sought psychiatric help at some early point in his life, telling the doctor his belief that he was once an alien race car driver, that we all have memory implants, etc., and the doctor telling him that he was a paranoid schizophrenic: from that moment, psychiatry appeared on the Hubbard Enemy List.

However, all religions/cults appear in the light of ludicrousness when viewed objectively (Jesus performing miracles, Allah speaking to Muhammad, Vishnu dreaming the world, etc). We could argue that religions rely on mythological symbology, that it's not supposed to be taken literally; yet, most Jews, Christians, and Muslims (many parishioners of Eastern religions are just as culpable) would strongly argue against such a "humanistic" approach. Certainly the Church of Scientology preaches literalism.

But it's the legal arm of Scientology, the cloak of secrecy their church invokes, that creates this sense of bewilderment in my mind.

--------------------
The salty fragrance of L’Eau I’mNotDedalus - made entirely of and entirely for sea turtles.

Posts: 1983 | From: Chicagoland, IL | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


Icon 207 posted      Profile for Silas Sparkhammer   Author's Homepage   E-mail Silas Sparkhammer   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by I'mNotDedalus:
However, all religions/cults appear in the light of ludicrousness when viewed objectively . . . Vishnu dreaming the world, etc. . . .

Actually, that last doesn't bother me a bit. It's totally self-consistent and untestable. Who the heck knows? All that there is in the cosmos might just be "The Red King's Dream." How could you even begin to falsify the hypothesis?

(The same is true for certain brands of predestination: how can you possibly falsify the notion? Heck, it was destined from the beginning of time that you would do, say, and believe everything you have ever done, said, and believed.)

Scientology's weakness isn't so much that its hypotheses can be tested -- some of them can, of course, and have already been trivially shown to be false -- but that it has attempted to operate as a "mystery cult," only gradually revealing more and more "hidden secrets" to members as they rise through the ranks. They have launched numerous lawsuits to try to prevent people from publishing these secrets, and they have always failed.

(Just as the Masons have failed in trying to keep their own "hidden secrets." You just can't *do* that in the information age!)

Silas

Posts: 16801 | From: San Diego, CA | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Delta-V
Xboxing Day


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Delta-V     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Makes you wonder if Christianity and Islam started out that way...

--------------------
"My neighbor asked why anyone would need a car that can go 190 mph. If the answer isn't obvious, and explaination won't help." - Csabe Csere

Posts: 1225 | From: Wichita, Kansas | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Ganzfeld
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 207 posted      Profile for Ganzfeld     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Delta-V:
Makes you wonder if Christianity and Islam started out that way...

Just to be fair, don't forget all the other major religion groups.

I always find it funny that so many people accept Buddhism, for example, as a kind of wishy-washy philosophy. Some Buddhist teachings are as weird and fabulous as anything you'd find in the other major religions. Some in the west have chosen only the most prosaic of the eastern beliefs and accepted these as a whole religion.

Posts: 4922 | From: Kyoto, Japan | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Michael Cole
Deck the Malls


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Michael Cole   E-mail Michael Cole   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Delta-V:
Makes you wonder if Christianity and Islam started out that way...

If you are talking about secrecy, then yes, they probably did.



--------------------
Q. What's the difference between a Computer saleman and a Used Car Salesman?
A. The Used Car Salesman knows when he is lying.

Posts: 421 | From: Victoria, Australia | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Carthage
Deck the Malls


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Carthage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ganzfeld:
quote:
Originally posted by Delta-V:
Makes you wonder if Christianity and Islam started out that way...

Just to be fair, don't forget all the other major religion groups.

I always find it funny that so many people accept Buddhism, for example, as a kind of wishy-washy philosophy. Some Buddhist teachings are as weird and fabulous as anything you'd find in the other major religions. Some in the west have chosen only the most prosaic of the eastern beliefs and accepted these as a whole religion.

(hijack) I'm with you there. That's something that positively (albeit metaphorically) crawls up my @#$ and builds condominiums. My favorite (paraphrased from memory) is, "I don't believe in organized religion. I'm Buddhist."

Baha'i often gets painted with the wishy-washy religion brush. Also very untrue. (/hijack)

As to the OP... I've been a bit dicey on Scientology since I did a personality test at one of their offices ages ago.

The first bell went off as I noticed that everything wrong with me could, apparently, be easily fixed by Scientology.

The second was when I asked to keep the printout of my results. The guy helping me with the test gave it to me, but on the way out... another man asked to see it. He took out a metal ruler and, well... edited it. From a three page printout to about a page and a quarter. I heard a lot of, "You don't need that... or that."

I do remember a section that instructed the... analyzer?... to downplay any high points on your personality chat, emphasize the bad, and always remember to say, "Scientology can help you with this".

--------------------
No offense was intended. Any resemblance to any offence, alive or dead, is purely coincidental.

Posts: 289 | From: Taiwan | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Floater
Xboxing Day


Icon 500 posted      Profile for Floater   Author's Homepage   E-mail Floater   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I have no idea where I read this, but I sort of like it:

Q: Is there really any science in scientology?
A: Oh, yes. It's a highly scientific method of separating fools from their money.

--------------------
Små hönor skall inte lägga stora ägg för då blir de slarviga i ändan

Posts: 1334 | From: Sweden | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Major D. Saster
The First USA Noel


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Major D. Saster         Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
How true.

Some 23 years ago, I was lured into one of those personality tests (the guy who got me in pretended to be a student working on a psychology project)... I filled in the forms, and eventually realized who I had to deal with when I was called into the "project leader's" office (I saw R.Hubbard's books on the shelves).

First, they really thought I was someone who badly needed help, being completely immature, with a lot of classical syndromes that could easily be fixed by Scientology... I said I wasn't interested, but they strongly insisted.

Yet, when I told them I was an apprentice earning only a few hundreds Francs a month, they let me go without regrets.

Go figure.

--------------------
Desperate, but not serious.

Posts: 689 | From: Confoederatio Helvetica | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Communication Attempt
Jingle Bell Hock


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Communication Attempt   E-mail Communication Attempt       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Scientology is nothing more than quack medicine gone to the next level.In the past you had the travelling peddler selling a variety of cure-alls.Today you have the organized group of pseudo-scientists who make it look even more convincing.Flashier gimmick,same result(that is,no result except a lighter wallet)

So it wouldn't surprise me one bit if Hubbard did it for money from the beginning.

--------------------
"I love God,he's so deliciously evil!" -Stewie,Family Guy

The fun thing about standards is that they come in so many varieties.

Posts: 510 | From: Ontario, Canada | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Brad from Georgia
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brad from Georgia   Author's Homepage   E-mail Brad from Georgia   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Harlan Ellison is among several others who claim to have been present when Hubbard got the idea for Scientology.

--------------------
"No hard feelin's and HOPpy New Year!"--Walt Kelly
Hear what you're missing: ARTC podcasts! http://artcpodcast.org/

Posts: 7581 | From: Gainesville, Georgia | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Delta-V
Xboxing Day


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Delta-V     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Cole:
If you are talking about secrecy, then yes, they probably did.

I mean the whole thing. Preying on those dissatisied with mainstream religion. Telling them they could solve all their problems. Swearing them to secrecy. Recruiting heavily among the wealth and prominent people (Constantine being the ultimate coup). Requesting (or demanding) that members sell their worldly possesions to fund the church.

--------------------
"My neighbor asked why anyone would need a car that can go 190 mph. If the answer isn't obvious, and explaination won't help." - Csabe Csere

Posts: 1225 | From: Wichita, Kansas | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
musicgeek
Deck the Malls


Icon 14 posted      Profile for musicgeek   E-mail musicgeek   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Delta-V:
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Cole:
If you are talking about secrecy, then yes, they probably did.

I mean the whole thing. Preying on those dissatisied with mainstream religion. Telling them they could solve all their problems. Swearing them to secrecy. Recruiting heavily among the wealth and prominent people (Constantine being the ultimate coup). Requesting (or demanding) that members sell their worldly possesions to fund the church.
Well, according to the writings of the early Christian church it was pretty clear that being Christian wouldn't solve any problems here on earth. Rather, it was stated repeatedly that Christians would have a tough time in general (oppression, persecutions, etc.) but that heavenly rewards awaited. Since there wasn't a formal church political structure, while adherents were advised to sell all they owned, they were instructed to give to the poor rather than to "the church." As for secrecy, while it's true that early Roman Christians worshipped in catacombs to escape the eyes of the Roman authorities, the new testament describes a very public ministry. It also emphasizes the recruitment of the poor and alienated rather than the rich and influential.

Of course, this doesn't mean the early church leaders were above sneaky tactics. (See Paul's use of the Athenian's "unknown god" temple in Acts 17:22-31). Later, early European missionaries used similarities between the icons of the Christian cross and the hammer of Thor to help convert Nordic pagans. Throughout history, some (apparently feeling "the ends justify the means") have manufactured holy relics, invented miracles, and, heck, even passed on urban legends as true items in sermon illustrations, all in the name of bringing people to God. Personally, I tend to think that such tactics do more harm than good by undermining credibility, but that's my own opinion.

--------------------
[God said] "I'll just sit back in the shade while everyone gets laid; that's what I call intelligent design." - Chris Smither, "Origin of the Species"

Posts: 411 | From: Fairfield, CT | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
AdmiralDinty
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


Icon 1 posted      Profile for AdmiralDinty   E-mail AdmiralDinty   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by musicgeek:
It also emphasizes the recruitment of the poor and alienated rather than the rich and influential.

This isn't entirely true. Modern Scripture scholarship has shown that the early Christians (as recorded by Acts) was quite a heterogeneous group. Meeks illustrates this masterfully in his book The First Urban Christians. For example, he shows that several of the Early Christians mentioned in Acts and the Pauline Epistles were well-to-do merchants, and thus sponsored many of the early communities. The "deaconess" Phoebe is a good example of this.

--------------------
"I wanna bite the hand that feeds me. I wanna bite that hand so badly. I wanna make them wish they'd never seen me." - Elvis Costello

Posts: 2291 | From: The Banks of the Merrimack, MA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


Icon 207 posted      Profile for Silas Sparkhammer   Author's Homepage   E-mail Silas Sparkhammer   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by AdmiralDinty:
quote:
. . . It also emphasizes . . .

This isn't entirely true. . .
While you actually do make some good points, this specific form of rebuttal always disturbs me...

Silas

Posts: 16801 | From: San Diego, CA | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
AdmiralDinty
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


Icon 1 posted      Profile for AdmiralDinty   E-mail AdmiralDinty   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Silas Sparkhammer:
quote:
Originally posted by AdmiralDinty:
quote:
. . . It also emphasizes . . .

This isn't entirely true. . .
While you actually do make some good points, this specific form of rebuttal always disturbs me...

Silas

Does it disturb you on a logical level, or on a rhetorical level?

--------------------
"I wanna bite the hand that feeds me. I wanna bite that hand so badly. I wanna make them wish they'd never seen me." - Elvis Costello

Posts: 2291 | From: The Banks of the Merrimack, MA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


Icon 207 posted      Profile for Silas Sparkhammer   Author's Homepage   E-mail Silas Sparkhammer   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by AdmiralDinty:
quote:
Originally posted by Silas Sparkhammer:
quote:
Originally posted by AdmiralDinty:
quote:
. . . It also emphasizes . . .

This isn't entirely true. . .
While you actually do make some good points, this specific form of rebuttal always disturbs me...

Silas

Does it disturb you on a logical level, or on a rhetorical level?
Mostly on a logical level... The word "emphasize" implies a correlative relationship, which, in Aristotelian terms, is of the "some" variety. "Some X are Y." To respond to it by saying, "That's not entirely true" is almost (not quite) tautologous, and (rhetorically) can be misleading.

Aristotle left out an intermediate form, "most." One might say, "Most criminals are men," or "Most pornography is boring." (Both true statements, I think...) But, again, to respond to either of those statements with a rebuttal, "That's not entirely true" is bad form: of course it's not "entirely" true. There are women criminals and good porn (not much, but some.) Yet this is not a rebuttal of the claim, and thus should not be phrased as one.

Anyway, apologies for nitpicking: one might say, "most logicians are persnickety," and I wouldn't be able to offer a counterexample!

Silas

Posts: 16801 | From: San Diego, CA | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
one_mans_conspiracy
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Quote from I'm not Dedalus:

"But it's the legal arm of Scientology, the cloak of secrecy their church invokes, that creates this sense of bewilderment in my mind."

This tactic of going after critics, backed by plenty of money and with an aggressive willingness to litigate against those who disagree with them, is one of the things that in my mind distinguishes a "cult" organization from other groups.

I think that whatever Hubbard's motivations were to begin with, a cult is what he ended up with.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
smilodonna
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Does anyone else remember the advertisements for Dianetics that used to be on TV all the time? I remember seeing them as a kid; I think there was a volcano in the ad. Since I had never heard of Scientology, I was always wondering why the heck this book was being advertised on TV so much.

I don't think I've seen another formal ad for Scientology since then, just heard about all the celebreties who belong to it.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
I'mNotDedalus
Happy Xmas (Warranty Is Over)


Icon 1 posted      Profile for I'mNotDedalus   Author's Homepage   E-mail I'mNotDedalus   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by smilodonna:
Does anyone else remember the advertisements for Dianetics that used to be on TV all the time? I remember seeing them as a kid; I think there was a volcano in the ad.

A few months back, I saw a brief commercial for Dianetics which also had the volcano. The volcano is a significant reference for those Scientologists who progress (ahem...pay) high enough inside the organization:

quote:
...the story of Xenu, the galactic tyrant who first kidnapped certain individuals who were deemed as 'excess population' and loaded these individuals into space planes for transport to the site of extermination, the planet of Teegeeack (Earth). These space planes were supposedly exact copies of Douglas DC-8s. He then stacked hundreds of billions of these frozen victims around Earth's volcanoes 75 million years ago before blowing them up with hydrogen bombs and brainwashing them with a "three-D, super colossal motion picture" for 36 days. The traumatised thetans subsequently clustered around human bodies, in effect acting as invisible spiritual parasites known as "Body Thetans" that can only be removed using advanced Scientology techniques.
Although, seeing as how this specific story is only supposed to be privy to those high ranking members (it's only become public knowledge "since being entered into evidence in several court cases beginning in the 1980s, synopses and excerpts of these secret teachings have appeared in innumerable publications"), I suspect the volcano in the commercial is just meant as a symbol for might, for overpowering freedom that Dianetics can grant you. [Roll Eyes]

--------------------
The salty fragrance of L’Eau I’mNotDedalus - made entirely of and entirely for sea turtles.

Posts: 1983 | From: Chicagoland, IL | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
bufungla
Let There Be PCs on Earth


Icon 22 posted      Profile for bufungla   Author's Homepage   E-mail bufungla   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Brad from Georgia:
Harlan Ellison is among several others who claim to have been present when Hubbard got the idea for Scientology.

Great link (though the last two paragraphs blew my irony detector to bits)

quote:
They infiltrated the FBI, they infiltrated the tax department... , the funny thing is, Ron Hubbard and I still occasionally communicate with each other. Every once in a while, a couple or three times a year, we exchange letters. And I write to him, you know, and I say, "Hey Ron, when is this bullshit going to cease? These cuckoos are really driving me crazy! They come around the house with pamphlets!" And he writes me back, and he says, "It's the good work, it's the good work."

It's all very funny stuff. He was going to write a new story for me for the last Dangerous Visions, but I guess he got too busy counting his money. I don't know.

buf 'The Last Dangerous Visions is more fictional than anything in Dianetics' ungla

--------------------
"Pardon him. Theodotus: he is a barbarian, and thinks that the customs of his tribe and island are the laws of nature."

George Bernard Shaw, Caesar and Cleopatra

Posts: 4847 | From: Washington, DC | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
WonkoTheSane
Happy Holly Days


Icon 1 posted      Profile for WonkoTheSane     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Waffles

--------------------
"It seemed to me that any civilization that had so far lost its head as to need to include detailed instructions for use in a package of toothpicks, was no longer a civilzation in which I could live and stay sane."

Posts: 1462 | From: Outside the Asylum (Massachusetts) | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
WonkoTheSane
Happy Holly Days


Icon 1 posted      Profile for WonkoTheSane     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm sure you've all seen this before, but for the newbies who might be interested:

Operation Clambake

An interesting site filled with interesting things about Scientology. Certainly not unbiased, but it gives you the other side. It's a resource for when I get hit with this crap.

Wonko

--------------------
"It seemed to me that any civilization that had so far lost its head as to need to include detailed instructions for use in a package of toothpicks, was no longer a civilzation in which I could live and stay sane."

Posts: 1462 | From: Outside the Asylum (Massachusetts) | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
magpie
Deck the Malls


Icon 1 posted      Profile for magpie   E-mail magpie   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by I'mNotDedalus:
However, all religions/cults appear in the light of ludicrousness when viewed objectively (Jesus performing miracles

I don't think Jesus's miracles were all that ludicrous. After all, I've seen David Blaine perform better stunts on street corners all across America. Walking on water? NFBSK that! I can levitate! Feeding people on a loaf of bread and some fish? David's got that beat, he can give people winning lottery tickets!
Posts: 439 | From: Redondo Beach, CA | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
timbobmc
Jingle Bell Hock


Icon 503 posted      Profile for timbobmc   E-mail timbobmc   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
So Scientology and the Church of Christ, Scientist are not the same thing? [dunce]

--------------------
Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen.

Posts: 536 | From: Gonzales, Louisiana | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Tootsie Plunkette
Buy a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Tootsie Plunkette   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
No. Mary Baker Eddy =/= L. Ron Hubbard

--------------------
--Tootsie

Posts: 5017 | From: Greater Seattle | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Silas Sparkhammer
I Saw V-Chips Come Sailing In


Icon 207 posted      Profile for Silas Sparkhammer   Author's Homepage   E-mail Silas Sparkhammer   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Hardly comparable; Dianetics and Scientology has, even according to its worst critics, only killed a few people. Christian Science has killed thousands.

Silas

Posts: 16801 | From: San Diego, CA | Registered: Sep 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Bassist
Chess Nuts Boasting 'Round an Open Fire


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Bassist   E-mail Bassist   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mage:
quote:
Originally posted by I'mNotDedalus:
However, all religions/cults appear in the light of ludicrousness when viewed objectively (Jesus performing miracles

I don't think Jesus's miracles were all that ludicrous. After all, I've seen David Blaine perform better stunts on street corners all across America. Walking on water? NFBSK that! I can levitate! Feeding people on a loaf of bread and some fish? David's got that beat, he can give people winning lottery tickets!
Looks like *somebody* has been watching a bit too much South Park [Roll Eyes]

--------------------
"I'm singing and deranged!"

Posts: 239 | From: Georgia | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Revolution 9
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
No idea whether it's true or not, but it wouldn't surprise me in the slightest that their boss is only in it for the money, I'm a bit cynical that way.

The scientologists are a hilarious lot though, the last time I came accross them I was on duty at a highland games, on a three man partol, and a line of scientologists in silly orange raincoats came up and tried to recruit us into their bloody religionf for some surreal reason! [lol] Even the fact that we didn't give them any money didn't phase them (the classic "sorry, we don't carry money when we're in uniform" always works, of course we do generally carry a bit of cash for unexpected eventualities, but we weren't going to tell them that!), and they invited us into their little gazebo type thing to show us what they do, and tried to convince us to join them and buy their literature under the excuse that they could teach us a few things about treating casualties. [Roll Eyes] [lol]

They asked to see some of the equipment we used, we declined to let them go through our kitbags of course, then tried to convince us that their techniques are far more effective at helping casualties than ours, telling us that our tried and tested techniques, which we go through a fair bit of regular training to learn before we're even allowed on duty, were useless, and proceeded to show us how they treat casualties, which as far as I can comprehend seems to involve touching up the defenseless casualty and chanting for a bit! [lol]

At this point we decided we couldn't spare any more time listening to these bloody cultists telling us to feel up our casualties, and left them with the words "Look mate, if I tried that on a casualty I'd be bloody locked up!" [lol] They then got quite offended and muttered some sour grapes stuff about how if we didn't want to learn some techniques that actually worked then that's our problem! [lol] Hilarious lot the scientologists! [lol]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Bloody Mary
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
Here's a question that I belive was brought up on these boards a long time ago, but I'll ask about it again.

Does anyone know why the website Religioustolerance.org has such a whitewashed report about Scientology controversies?

The rumor that was brought up in the past was that Religioustolerance.org was a Scientology front, but that seems unlikely based on the somewhat liberal viewpoints put forth on that site about things such as homosexuality and abortion (which are contrary to Scientologist views).

Even so, the obvious lack of certain info in the "Controversy" section of Religioustolerance's Scientology page is puzzling, particularly when compared with entries for other religions on that site where opposing views are expressed in great detail.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jon Up North
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jon Up North   E-mail Jon Up North   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
It is a Scientology apoligist site.

--------------------
We're not insured for pickles.

Posts: 2358 | From: Fort McMurray, Alberta | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Bloody Mary
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jon Up North:
It is a Scientology apoligist site.

Really? Has that been proven?

Note that I'm not refering to religiousfreedom.com or anything relating to the Scientology front group Foundation for Religious Freedom.

To my knowledge, www.religioustolerance.org (based in Canada) is still claiming to be an impartial info site made up of members from several differnt religions. Since I haven't seen anything denouncing the site on any of the well known anti-Scientology sites like Xenu.net, I thought their allegiance was still unproven. [Confused]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post new topic  Post a reply Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2