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Steelmage
The Red and the Green Stamps


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Are Albino moose rare, or does the color of the moose change with the season. The photos are here:

http://www.coasttocoastam.com/gen/page873.html

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FrozenChosen
The Red and the Green Stamps


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I don't know, but I do have a story about Albino Deer. In the Marquette MI, there is a place called Presque Isle. It's positively full of deer. There were two albino deer there one year. They were not only shunned by the rest of the deer, they shunned each other. (I believe they both died from the cold because they had no other deer to snuggle up to). (Not a FOAF story - it happened while i lived there - I saw the deer alive, and I was very sad to hear they had died, as well as the reason).
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TB Tabby
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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I'd just like to say that I fully appreciate the use of the correct plural form of "moose."

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Die Capacitrix
We Three Blings


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I do not believe the color of moose change with the season. Most animals that change with the seasons tend to be small (rabbit, fox, etc.).

From Idaho Fish & Game News Release:

quote:
Q. I heard about the albino moose in southeast Idaho. How often does anyone see one of these?

A. In that particular population of moose, the occurrence of pure albino moose is just one animal in 100,000. Considering that Idaho does not have 100,000 moose at any one time, it is not a common sight.

So did anyone else look at the picture and think White Chocolate Moose (mousse)?

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Barns & No Bull
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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Although "Coast to Coast AM With George Noory" is human scum, and is like some sort of acid eating into human rationality.... I think these are real photos of two real albino moose. Is that a mother and her large calf?

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Sara at home
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


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Moose do not change color with the season. Had plenty in my yard during winter when I lived in Anchorage. None were white.

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Assume that all my posts will be edited at least once. Dyslexic -- can't spell, can't type, can't proofread.

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inkiemouse
Let It Wasabi


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Are those spots whose pigment didn't change (or they were just that way naturally) or is the moose dirty? O_o

That's something to consider...


Usually something that is albino is all white, no?

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Ovalescent
We Wish You a Merry Giftmas


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I don't know what affects it, but I've seen "albinos" that are merely light brown or cream colored, as well as some with spots like the moose above have. Maybe it's not complete albinism?

Edit: Here's some pics of albino animals, including the kinds I'm talking about: http://animalpicturesarchive.com/list.php?qry=albino

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gothixgirl
I'm Dreaming of a White Sale


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is albinism more prevalent in certain types of animals? I've heard of lots of albino snakes, but rarely larger animals such as the moose in question.

oh and if anyone has seen the miniseries "gormenghast" they actually managed to get the only albino raven, well i thought it was cool but i tend to be dorkily interested in such things...

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Laser Potato
I Saw Three Shipments


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I see deer with that coloring sometimes-they're piebald, not albino. Piebald animals are partially or totally white, but still have pigmentation, whereas albinos have no pigmentation.

Piebaldness in various animals:
http://tinyurl.com/69ohv
http://tinyurl.com/6a2ra
http://tinyurl.com/695ob
http://tinyurl.com/4rdpz
http://tinyurl.com/4ehos

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Floater
Xboxing Day


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quote:
Originally posted by Barns & No Bull:
I think these are real photos of two real albino moose. Is that a mother and her large calf?

Not necessarily albino. There are strains of white elks in Sweden that are quite normal except for the coloration.

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Alice
I Saw Three Shipments


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Funny this should come up, I just got this in the mail the other day.
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I think it looks like a black bear and a polar bear cub? Here is the text that came with it:

"THiS PICTURE Was TAKEN NEAR GORDON, WI

Not just any mother bear and her cub, but a black bear with a white cub.
I don't know how rare it is for a black bear to have a white cub but at least we can say we've seen it no matter how rare it is!

Since there seems to be no sign of a pink nose or eyes, I would say that it is not an albino."

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Barns & No Bull
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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When animals produce no pigments (and are essentially white or nearly all white) yet have black or dark eyes and pigmented skin... they are called leucistic.

I think those moose and the bear cub might be displaying leucism, not albinism.

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Alice
I Saw Three Shipments


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Thank you Barns! I was pretty sure it wasn't a polar bear. I imagine they don't last too long in the wild, standing out like a sore thumb.


Ok, I'm just going to edit my self a li'l bear chow here if you dont mind...
*sneaks away quietly*

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Barns & No Bull
It Came Upon a Midnight Clearance


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quote:
Originally posted by Alice:

I imagine they don't last too long in the wild, standing out like a sore thumb.

That makes some sense, but I wouldn't jump to that prediction. You are suggesting that the white bear cub would be targeted for predation because of its outstanding and highly-visible color. Bear cubs have few natural predators (other bears, wolves, cougars, eagles, etc.), and they are viciously defended by their mothers. Adult bears really have no natural predators - they are at the top of the food chain.

This white bear cub could very well have grown to maturity and lived out its life in Manitoba, this is in spite of its atypical color. The story of this particular animal is tragic, as its mother was killed by a car.

There are areas of coastal British Columbia where the black bear populations frequently display white or cream coats. This is almost certainly leucism, not albinism. There is a nearly-white population on Gribble Island, BC. A "bluish"-colored black bear population exists near Yakutat Bay, Alaska.

We have now seen numerous photos of white moose (the "Coast to Coast" OP link is dead) in North America and Europe. These show adults, and adults (cows) with calves. This tells us that in some cases, white moose escape predation and live to produce white offspring. We saw a link about a white moose cow with normal-colored calf in Idaho. Idaho has bears (black & grizzly), which are primary predators of moose calves. Wolves are moose predators too, but the Idaho wolves were extirpated by humans long ago.

Floater, there are numerous white moose in Sweden. Do you have any wolves in Sweden?

I think that none of the described and photographed white moose are true albinos. They seem to be leucistic.

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Floater
Xboxing Day


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quote:
Originally posted by Barns & No Bull:

Floater, there are numerous white moose in Sweden. Do you have any wolves in Sweden?

Yes, we have, but in my opinion too few (I googled a bit and saw the figure less than 100). Farmers and reindeer herders are of a different opinion, though. Not too long ago there was a male wolf that apparently had wandered in from Russia via Finland and, naturally, it was shot immediately. A pity, it would have been good with some fresh blood (or genes).

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Små hönor skall inte lägga stora ägg för då blir de slarviga i ändan

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