snopes.com   
search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hello snopes.com » Archived Forums » Food Archive » Refrigerate canned fish products?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Refrigerate canned fish products?
Hacker Barbie
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


Icon 205 posted      Profile for Hacker Barbie   E-mail Hacker Barbie   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
Shopping for groceries with my Mom yesterday has made me remember a quirk of hers: she refrigerates canned fish. For some reason, she thinks that sprats, sardines, and the like need to be refrigerated, even if they're in a can.

Her view on this is that since they don't have preservatives in them, they need to be refrigerated. The reason cans of sardines sit on store shelves unrefrigerated is because they're only sitting there for a short time until they're bought and refrigerated.

My view is that if it's in a can, it's fine unrefrigerated. The reason cans of sardines sit on store shelves unrefrigerated is because they're cans and don't need it!

Do sardines need to be refrigerated? How about sprats? Any other fish? Any other canned goods? Does fish in oil differ from fish in some other liquid in terms of refrigeration?

Diana

Posts: 2351 | From: Germany | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
A-Train
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 01 posted            Edit/Delete post 
If you open them, then yes, I would refrigerate them...
IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Pogue Ma-humbug
Happy Christmas (Malls are Open)


Icon 401 posted      Profile for Pogue Ma-humbug   E-mail Pogue Ma-humbug   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
I usually put them in the pantry. But I'd say there's nothing wrong with putting them in the fridge.

Pogue

--------------------
Let's drink to the causes in your life:
Your family, your friends, the union, your wife.

Posts: 11325 | From: Kentucky | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Spam & Cookies-mmm
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 606 posted      Profile for Spam & Cookies-mmm   E-mail Spam & Cookies-mmm   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
Salt is a preservative. So is the airtight can.

Then again, some people just prefer things to be served cold. My mom keeps canned fruit in the fridge for this reason.

--------------------
Did you see the Announcement?
There's a new snopes message board!

Posts: 7767 | From: Paradise Ceded | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
LizzyJingleBells
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 210 posted      Profile for LizzyJingleBells   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
HB, I'm with you. Salt is a preservative, and so is sealing it in an air tight can. Ergo, there's no need to refrigertate it. It's the same as canned veggies and fruit. As long as the can isn't opened, there is no need to refrigerate the product.

As for oil vs. water, I really don't know. I always buy the water packed tuna myself, just because it's healthier.

--------------------
Come on, come on, we were once upon a time in love
If the only prayer you say in your life is thank you, that would suffice. - Meister Eckhart My Blog

Posts: 7725 | From: Columbus, Ohio | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Tootsie Plunkette
Buy a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella


Icon 606 posted      Profile for Tootsie Plunkette   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
According to The Cook's Thesaurus:
quote:
Unopened canned sardines can be stored for up to a year in a dry, cool place. Once opened, they will keep for up to two days if you wrap them well and refrigerate them.


--------------------
--Tootsie

Posts: 5017 | From: Greater Seattle | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Hacker Barbie
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


Icon 205 posted      Profile for Hacker Barbie   E-mail Hacker Barbie   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
Thanks! That's kind of what I've been suspecting. Nice to have some reassurance.

Diana

Posts: 2351 | From: Germany | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 504 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
Just to elaborate slightly - there is absolutely no need to refrigerate canned food, once the footstuff is in that sealed environment it can indeed be kept for extended periods of time without spoiling, depending on the product - though I would like to mention one thing...

...once the can has been open, it is advisable to decant any remaining product from the can into another suitable conatiner before refrigerating - leaving food in open cans, even in the fridge, can lead to baccilus, coli-aerogenes and other nasties that can lead to a bout of food poisoning - apparently the inside of a tin can is the ideal growth medium. [Wink]

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Deciduousblonde
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 19 posted            Edit/Delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Tea:
Just to elaborate slightly - there is absolutely no need to refrigerate canned food, once the footstuff is in that sealed environment it can indeed be kept for extended periods of time without spoiling, depending on the product - though I would like to mention one thing...

...once the can has been open, it is advisable to decant any remaining product from the can into another suitable conatiner before refrigerating - leaving food in open cans, even in the fridge, can lead to baccilus, coli-aerogenes and other nasties that can lead to a bout of food poisoning - apparently the inside of a tin can is the ideal growth medium. [Wink]

I heard that too! I have always put opened cans in the fridge without any problems. My mother tells me that I should take the food out of the can to refrigerate because of the chemical content in the can, apparently it affects the food once the can has been opened? [Confused]
IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
MDW Bill en z granfaders vootshteps
The Red and the Green Stamps


Icon 214 posted            Edit/Delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Deciduousblonde:
My mother tells me that I should take the food out of the can to refrigerate because of the chemical content in the can, apparently it affects the food once the can has been opened?

IIRC it's not really the "tin" can per se. It's the fact that you can't seal an open can very well, so there's a lot of circulation thru the air on top of the fish/fruit. Air carries germs, which is why most tin cans are "vacuum sealed" IOW the air is removed before the can is sealed.

Midway "she certainly can can-can" Bill

IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
tagurit
Ding Dong! Merrily on High Definition TV


Icon 206 posted      Profile for tagurit   E-mail tagurit   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
I found references to food poisoning and lead poisoning resulting from storing food in open cans in the refrigerator. The lead poisoning results were all at UK sites, so I'm not sure if the cans are different in the UK, than the US. Possibly I needed to modify my search. At any rate, it's not a good idea to store open cans. Put leftover canned foods in an airtight container.

tag

--------------------
Explore, enjoy and protect the planet
---
AAMAH

Posts: 8532 | From: Michigan | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
laura 2
The First USA Noel


Icon 19 posted      Profile for laura 2   Author's Homepage     Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
I remember reading in an Ann Landers column one time that you can actually store opened mayonaise in a cool cupboard or pantry in stead of the fridge. She quoted the Mayonaise Advisory Board (or some kind of official sounding organization) as saying it was fine to do this.

Anyone else hear about this?

Laura "sounds like e coli to me" 2

--------------------
My Belly Dance Business - Galatea Middle Eastern Dance - www.galateadancer.com

Q: What's the difference between an onion and a mizmar?
A: No one cries when they cut up a mizmar.

Posts: 786 | From: Milwaukee, WI | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Jay Tea
The "Was on Sale" Song


Icon 19 posted      Profile for Jay Tea   E-mail Jay Tea   Send new private message       Edit/Delete post 
If the mayonnaise is jarred, (read: processed) then there would be a limited shelf life in a cool dry environment such as a food larder for a jar in use (as with butter and eggs), but this would only extend to a few weeks, not the ice ages most of us keep mayo hanging around for!

If the eggy crap is fresh, refrigeration is a must, certainly in my opinion, and it should be used within 48 hours – I’ve seen a man suffer badly from baccilus infection after ploughing his way through leftover chicken tureen, mopping up the lemon mayo which had congealed in the fridge – he said it felt like hid body was trying to rid itself of it’s internal organs – through his ringpiece!  -

--------------------
This is where I come up with something right? Something really clever...

Posts: 6552 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
   

   Close topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Urban Legends Reference Pages

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2