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Author Topic: Rude French at EuroDisney
jw
The First USA Noel


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originally posted by Alex Buchet
quote:
French manners ARE unspeakably rotten-- driving. The French themselves acknowledge it.
I've driven in France many times and have found many a helpful motorist give directions / check air cond. / help me get a tow truck/ fill my car with petrol with their credit card in exchange for cash (because French stations don't accept ours)

Alex,you might be doing your countrymen a disservice.
As a tourist, I've regularly encountered many cultural driving problems, not just in France.
Roundabouts - most work the same as everywhere else but some of the larger ones give priority to traffic trying to enter the roundabout.
Flashing your headlights here means that you're giving way. In France the opposite.

--------------------
On my old guitar sell tickets, so someone can finally pick it.

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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Well, you may be right, JW. Let's say my view is coloured:

a) I've lived in Paris since 1973. And I use public transport exclusively.

I've assimilated the snotty Parisian (New Yorker, Berliner)notion that CARS are for HICKS.

b)I've become a cycling fanatic these past two years, and so I'm probably jaundiced in my view of French drivers.

Still...

--For a similar population, both in size and in composition, France has almost twice as many traffic fatalities as Great Britain has.

Something's wrong, here, and I suspect it's mostly an excessive tolerance for alcohol at the wheel, combined with a cultural contempt for regulation.

Who knows? Not I.

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Cold DecEmbra Brings The Sleet
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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crivvens... I have booked a car for our holiday to France in July and now I'm wondering if we'll get away from Marseille airport alive!

That's right, not only do I live in Surrey but I am holidaying in Provence this year. My middle names are "Middle Class Cliche". I can't wait [Big Grin]

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I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war.

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forcadragons
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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America, I'm sorry to say that I encountered one of your worst in a souvenir shop in Cologne, Germany at the weekend.

  • Made no attempt to speak German. Not even a "Guten Tag"
  • Assumed that the shop took US dollars
  • Upon discovering that it didn't, slapped a wad of Euros on the counter expecting the cashier to count it and tell her if there was enough.

The young girl behind the counter was perfectly courteous. She even had to ring the items up again as two separate transactions - one which could be covered by cash, the rest on a credit card. I guess you develop a thick skin dealing with tourists, but at that point I was glad I didn't have her job.

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We're sorry to bother you at such a time like this, Mrs. Twice. We would have come earlier, but your husband wasn't dead then.

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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Although one still encounters "ugly Americans" abroad, on the whole Americans are polite and friendly when traveling.

Even the obnoxious young lady forcadragons describes seemed to be acting out of ignorance more than nastiness.

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Ramblin' Dave, quietly making noise
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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That's the kind of story that makes me glad, as an American, that I wasn't anywhere near there at the time! I'd have wanted to just drop through the floor at that point.

It's funny, when I was in Asia, most Americans there didn't speak a word of the local languages, but they also never carried around American money and expected that to fly. I guess it helped that, if you were white or black, the locals really didn't expect you to be able to speak much Chinese. Also, since it's a less obvious tourist trap than Europe, people who go there are more likely to be really interested in the local culture whether they understand much of it or not.

Thanks to everyone, by the way, for all the stories about Paris. I'm planning on moving there in September, and the more I hear about what to expect, the better!

Ramblin' "and yes, I speak French, sort of" Dave

--------------------
Another lifetime I'd have fallen in love with you
Swept away by my feelings, ashamed and confused
But just now it's enough to be walking with you
Let the mystery play as it will! -Lui Collins

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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Dave, when you're ready to come to Paris, give me a heads up. We'll have a Pastis together.

(Same for any other Snopester coming my way.)

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EthanMitchell
Deck the Malls


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I've spent a lot of time in France, and I speak rotten French. They were great. I've also been to Japan. As long as we are making gross national stereotypes, I want to throw down for the Japanese as one of the rudest nations on earth to foreigners, perhaps tied only with the U.S. The Japanese have a better excuse--island country, isolationism, etc.--but they are still a sight to behold.

You wanna talk about Eurodisney? I got taken to Tokyo Disneyland three NFBSKing times because it was clearly something an American would enjoy.

Of course, that isn't actual rudeness, with malice aforethought, it's just cultural ignorance. But aaaarrrr....

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The Fourth Man
Deck the Malls


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quote:
Originally posted by Alex Buchet:
(Same for any other Snopester coming my way.)

[hijack]What about the ones already there?[/hijack]

The Fourth "Make it a beer for me, it's still too cold for pastis" Man

--------------------
If you keep trying, you'll eventually succeed. Therefore, the more you fail, the higher your chances of success.
-- Jacques Rouxel, 1931-2004 RIP :(

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Marzndruz
Silly rabbi, kicks are for Trids!


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I've never had a bad experience in Paris (other than being ripped off by a taxi driver who took an awfully long route from the Bastille to the Marais in the wee hours - I swear we went past Place de la Concorde three times!). But I always attempt a bit of the language no matter what country I'm in.

I bought a bottle of wine at a wine shop in Paris from a man whose English was limited to wine-related terms, and my French was on a par with "Ou est la tour Eiffel?" But I got some excellent wine at a good price as a gift for the friends I was staying with.

I also managed to make train reservations from Naples to Milan entirely in (broken basic)Italian. I'm sure the clerk spoke English, but he was very friendly and I appreciated him "forcing" me to communicate in Italian. I made some boo-boos, called him on them, and he corrected my Italian (like I said, in a very friendly manner), and immediately fixed the "mistake". One of the best travel/linguistic experiences of my life.

The absolute worst experience I ever had was in the town of Fussen in Bavaria/Germany. It's a small town, but it's home to Neuschwanstein castle, which you'd think would make it tourist-friendly. My SO and I were spending the night there in early Spring (snow everywhere) and went to dinner at a small inn near our hotel. It was pretty empty, and some men at the only other occupied table kept looking at us while talking. Tom (my SO) knows German, and he was getting very uncomfortable.

One of the men got up and bussed our table, and in English, asked how our meal was, adding, "So much better than your Colonel Sanders, no?"

I just smiled and said, "I wouldn't know. I don't eat at Colonel Sanders." We got out of there as fast as we could.

On the same trip, we encountered not exactly "ugly" Americans, but a somewhat crude one: a woman with a blonde hair-helmet on a canal boat in Amsterdam. While we were waiting for the boat to depart for its tour, her hubby went up the gangplank to grab a snack ashore. She yelled out [do this in a brassy Texas accent]: "Hey, get me one o' them braat-wursts! An' put some sour-kraut on it!"

We moved to the back of the boat with the Canadians.

Meanwhile, I'm brushing up on German and trying to figure out Czech for an upcoming vacation in August/September . . .

--------------------
My doctor told me to drink more. I didn't realize he was talking about water.

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by The Fourth Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Alex Buchet:
(Same for any other Snopester coming my way.)

[hijack]What about the ones already there?[/hijack]

The Fourth "Make it a beer for me, it's still too cold for pastis" Man

Yeah, it is unnaturally cold in Paris for the season. Hey, Fourth Man, if you're a fan of the Shadoks (Pieplu's just died, boo hoo) I'll buy you a beer!
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Cold DecEmbra Brings The Sleet
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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Marzndruz:
quote:
The absolute worst experience I ever had was in the town of Fussen
I visited Fussen quite a few times when I was younger, because we took our summer holiday for several years in a row at Weissensee, which is a lake up the road from the town. I was too young to appreciate whether it was tourist-friendly or not: my main recollection is of a top-notch toy shop! Mind you, "Bayern ist anders", apparently (apologies for the rubbish German!).

Alex Buchet and Fourth Man - I will probably be taking a trip to Paris in July (L'Orangerie is open at last!). I would love to have some bar/restaurant recommendations (they can be anywhere in the city - I haven't booked a hotel yet).

--------------------
I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war.

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Zachary Fizz
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Embra, can I recommend Taillevent, on the Rue Lamenais? I'd say it is my favourite restaurant anywhere.

You'll need to book ahead. I have the number somewhere, and will PM it to you in the next few days.

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Cold DecEmbra Brings The Sleet
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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How kind! The trip is for my birthday so I'm sure I can impress on Mr E the need for a fancy meal...

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I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war.

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Ramblin' Dave, quietly making noise
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Thanks, guys. I'll probably be getting to Paris in late August sometime, or maybe the beginning of September.

quote:
Originally posted by EthanMitchell:
As long as we are making gross national stereotypes, I want to throw down for the Japanese as one of the rudest nations on earth to foreigners, perhaps tied only with the U.S.

I met a fair number of Japanese tourists when I lived in Taiwan, and I'll second that. I think they look upon the rest of Asia the same way the US has historically looked at Latin America, as the amusing kid brother who isn't quite ready for prime time. On the other hand, I met a fair number of Japanese people who were living or working there, and the difference was like night and day. They were friendly and respectful and usually fond of Westerners since we were foreigners there too.

--------------------
Another lifetime I'd have fallen in love with you
Swept away by my feelings, ashamed and confused
But just now it's enough to be walking with you
Let the mystery play as it will! -Lui Collins

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Biggles
I Saw Three Shipments


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Hearing these stories reminds me that "The pural of anecdote is not data". I'm sure there are plenty of rude French people out there (not that I have met one), but its a big stretch to assume that French staff need special training because there is a French trait or cultural difference that simply makes them more rude than in other countries.

Being rude seems to often just be a matter of not understanding the local rules some time; for instance I have found myself acting like a ugly white guy at times when traveling in S.E. Asia. For instance we don't tip waiters around here, so I probably left a stream of disgruntled locals when traveling until I figured out the rules. Even then I remember giving a hotel porter a tip consisting of all the coins I had in my pocket after arriving in a Jakata hotel late at night. I worked out later when doing my expense report, the coins (when US$1 = 2500Rp) probably worked out at being worth about 2-3 cents. The NZ $1 & $2 coins probably were not worth much to him either [Wink]

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forcadragons
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by Embra:
Alex Buchet and Fourth Man - I will probably be taking a trip to Paris in July (L'Orangerie is open at last!). I would love to have some bar/restaurant recommendations (they can be anywhere in the city - I haven't booked a hotel yet).

If you are there on the 14th, Bastille Day, you must go to the Champ de Mars to see the firework display around the Eiffel Tower.

--------------------
We're sorry to bother you at such a time like this, Mrs. Twice. We would have come earlier, but your husband wasn't dead then.

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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Embra, Taillevent is one of the most exclusive and expensive restaurants on the face of the earth.

Zachary, that was quite unkind, and snobbish, even if not meant to be so. I suppose the American equivalent would be:
"Oh, you're going to Boston? The Ritz is, of course, the ONLY hotel to stay at."

I don't intend to be unkind; but I hope that you didn't, either.

Ember, I'll work up a guide. I'd be happy and honored if you and your SO broke bread with me. Same for ramblin' Dave.

(Mon Dieu, this will end with a Snopester orgy on Impressionists' Island!)

Thomas 'Fourth Man':
Are you French, or American, or like me some dubious hybrid? Yeah, let's get together some time. So many beers, so little time...

Tu me contactes ici, d'ac'-o-d'ac'?

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Angel With Wax Wings
Deck the Malls


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I have never been to France but my sister has. She had a relatively nice expereince because she was on a class trip for band. Except she did mention that when their band was playing in an open area that some of the Parisians spit on one of the drummers. They never really figured out WHY that happened but it did.

~Monica

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"Run for five minutes? Why don't you just shoot me now?"--Comic Book Guy (Simpsons)

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Cactus Wren
Jingle Bell Hock


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I wonder if Americans travel through the world hoping everyone will speak English because we're ashamed of our own inadequacy in other languages? "The person who speaks several languages is called polyglot, the person who speaks two is called bilingual, the person who speaks one is called American": we're not used to stumbling in another language. Europeans are accustomed to the idea that if you travel a few hundred miles, you're going to find yourself surrounded by members of another culture who speak another language: they're used, not only to the concept of different languages, but to that of trying to make yourself understood in a language not your own. I think Americans are embarrassed when we try to speak in other languages than English because we're very uncomfortable with trying to communicate in a language we're less than completely fluent in. We're afraid of embarrassing ourselves, afraid people will laugh at our accents or our bad vocabulary ... and now, as I type this, I wonder if we aren't projecting our own intolerance onto other cultures? Might not the avid "English-only" activist, the promoter of "Official English" bills, be on some level afraid of being humiliated by someone shouting at him that if he's in France he should be speaking in French, and fluent French at that?

(The educator John Holt wrote that on a bicycle tour of Italy in the 1950s, the hardest thing he had to do was walk into a shop and say -- IIRC -- "Due kilo di banane, per favore." He was dreadfully afraid of embarrassing himself with that simple request. He didn't, of course: he bought his bananas, paid for them, thanked the nice lady in the shop, and left, as simple as that.)

--------------------
“Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar.” -- Edward R. Murrow

IOToriSparrowANK!

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Ganzfeld
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by Cactus Wren:
[...]"The person who speaks several languages is called polyglot, the person who speaks two is called bilingual, the person who speaks one is called American": we're not used to stumbling in another language.[...]

It's muchkin time!

I hear this said a lot. As a bilingual American who knows many others, I would like to ask, is: Is there any truth to this stereotype? Are Americans really much less likely than other people to speak another language, even fluently? I seriously doubt it.

Something like 20% of all Americans were born in another country. That number by itself should give us a clue that not all Americans are monolingual. I don't know who started this nonsense about Americans not speaking foreign languages but I say it's time we asked for the evidence. There are many countries in the world in which ordinary people speak more than one language functionally but there are also a great many where only one language is spoken. In countries that are supposedly multilingual, there are plenty of people who are monolingual.

Some countries have a reputation for speaking English well but travelling or living there you quickly realize that their reputation as English speakers simply isn't justified. China, one of the most populous countries in the world doesn't really have a particlarly staggering proficiency at multiple languages, aside from several variations of Chinese and various minority groups. Why isn't the punchline of the joke about Chinese people? (No offense to anyone Chinese. I think China is quite normal in this regard.) Probably because, unless you go to China, you're more likely to meet one of the ones who does speak English or another language. My guess is that most people in Asia and South America are monolingual, and probably most of Africa, too, even in areas where two or more languages are spoken. Maybe even Europe too. The people we're likely to meet in these places may tend to have a greater language proficiency than oridinary people.

So are Americans really unusually uncomfortable with or unaccustomed to foreign languages? I seriously doubt it.

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Cold DecEmbra Brings The Sleet
Angels Wii Have Heard on High


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quote:
Embra, Taillevent is one of the most exclusive and expensive restaurants on the face of the earth.

[Big Grin]
I did go and have a wee look at their website after I posted, and their 140 Euro menu was a little bit of a giveaway. Then again, I know Mr Fizz as a man of wealth and taste...

Anyhow, Alex Buchet, it would be very nice if you would let me know of any other recommended eateries [Smile]

As for speaking foreign languages, I certainly suffer from the fear of being ridiculed in a foreign language. This exasperates my SO as my French is tolerable and my German is functional for asking tourist questions at least. But I certianly recognise that fear of being ridiculed if you don't come out with a grammatically or idiomatically perfect statement straight away. In fact, I've been booking campsites in France for our summer holiday and i've had to write myself a script for the phone! Actually the real fear comes when the person on the other end doesn't say "Ah, would you prefer to use English?", but actually responds in French: I barely ever hear French spoken and it can be difficult to "tune in".

--------------------
I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war.

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wolfe2dale
I Saw Three Shipments


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Having grown up in the UK I am a little biased about the French, that said, one of the most common belief's over here is that Disney paris is full of horribly rude people & that you may as well go to Florida where you can, at least, expect good manners & service. Due to this I will be taking my son all the way to the USA for his Disney experience.

Not having been to Disney Paris I couldn't say for sure if any of this is true or not, but it does show how an accepted (British) opinion about rude Frenchmen can effect the average persons holiday plans.

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terralioness
Jingle Bell Hock


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quote:
Originally posted by RubyMoon:
And on the matter of language -- some one comes from France to New York, and they walk into a store and say "Hello, do you speak French", they will know what rudeness is.

Are you trying to make a joke? New York is one of the most, if not the most, multilingual cities in the US. My boss speaks English, Italian and Spanish (and that's just what I know of!) and one of my coworkers speaks Dutch; they make a point of using the languages whenever practical because it makes our customers more comfortable. If someone came in asking if we spoke French, we'd do our best between my high school classes and my boss's fluent Spanish.

It's pretty fashionable to find an opportunity to call New Yorkers rude, but it's just as offensive as the people who insist the French are rude.

--------------------
"I never liked Hemingway."
"I never liked you."

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by wolfe2dale:
Having grown up in the UK I am a little biased about the French, that said, one of the most common belief's over here is that Disney paris is full of horribly rude people & that you may as well go to Florida where you can, at least, expect good manners & service. Due to this I will be taking my son all the way to the USA for his Disney experience.

Not having been to Disney Paris I couldn't say for sure if any of this is true or not, but it does show how an accepted (British) opinion about rude Frenchmen can effect the average persons holiday plans.

Well, this illustrates well one of the main sources for American francophobia: the irrational prejudice and hatred the English feel for us French; anglophile or culturally intimidated Americans buy into their rancid rigmarole.

"Wogs begin at Calais", eh, Wolfie?

Loyal 'Sun' reader, are you?

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Ramblin' Dave, quietly making noise
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Actually, there's a perception among many Americans (I guess it's fair to call it a stereotype rather than a perception) that the British think we're a bunch of hicks who stole and mutilated their language. So I don't know how much clout you should give to British attitudes when it comes to what Americans think.

--------------------
Another lifetime I'd have fallen in love with you
Swept away by my feelings, ashamed and confused
But just now it's enough to be walking with you
Let the mystery play as it will! -Lui Collins

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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24 hours later-- I apologise to wolfe2dale for my churlishness-- I guess I had to supply SOME example of the rude Frenchman.
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Jaime Vargas Sanchez
Let There Be PCs on Earth


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quote:
Originally posted by Cactus Wren:
Europeans are accustomed to the idea that if you travel a few hundred miles, you're going to find yourself surrounded by members of another culture who speak another language

That would be assuming that Europeans are accustomed to the idea of travelling a few hundred miles [Wink]

--------------------
"Everyone has problems. They only vary in design" - Mama Duck

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Zachary Fizz
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Alex Buchet, I would never be unkind or snobbish to Embra, who I consider a friend.

I would hope I'm not very unkind or snobbish to those I don't consider friends, either.

I am not advocating eating at Taillevent every evening, although I would if I could. But a trip to Paris is always a special occasion if you don't live there; what better way to make the most of it than to enjoy one of the best of France's many contributions to human happiness.

ETA: and it's not like I said it was the only place to eat, either. Just that I recommend it. It is my favourite restaurant.

quote:
Then again, I know Mr Fizz as a man of wealth and taste...

[Big Grin] Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed my name.
Posts: 2370 | From: Arabia | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
NinthSign
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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quote:
Originally posted by forcadragons:
America, I'm sorry to say that I encountered one of your worst in a souvenir shop in Cologne, Germany at the weekend.

  • Made no attempt to speak German. Not even a "Guten Tag"
  • Assumed that the shop took US dollars
  • Upon discovering that it didn't, slapped a wad of Euros on the counter expecting the cashier to count it and tell her if there was enough.



Yesterday at work some Americans came in and were asking in their Southern accents, "Is this yellow thingy a Canadian dollar? What's it called... a loooooooonie?" I was at the next till, and it was really mean of me but I giggled. Looooonie, ahahaha. The double o's were really drawn out.


I haven't been to France, but I know this next one will be a huge shocker [Wink] . I've traveled with some really rude Canadians. When I was sixteen I went to Greece with some people at my high school, and we were combined with a group from Ontario and a group from British Columbia and many people, even those from my high school were rude. Two girls I had to room with at the first hotel were horsing around and broke a glass sliding door then went into histrionics when they were told that they actually might have to pay for it. Oh no, it was not their fault they were trying to fit a huge chair through a small door onto an even smaller balcony clearly the glass in Greece is inferior. They laughed at traditional costumes (oh my god, he’s wearing tights!) and open hand waved at everyone even though our guide told us it was rude several times [dunce] . Then they refused to acknowledge that the Euro coins have their value written on them and asked loudly how much they were wherever they went, “These things are so hard to tell apart and clearly copied from Canadian money.” Riiiight [Roll Eyes] . The best part was when they all loudly complained about having to stand on a bus. We all had to stand, suck it up. I wasn’t tall enough to reach the support bar and spent half the trip falling down every time we stopped and the other half clinging to another group member. It was an experience, and fun really, like an amusement park ride.

Posts: 149 | From: Nova Scotia, Canada | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Zachary Fizz
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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I am still smarting about Alex's post.
It is possible that a Taillevent bill might be a little painful. But I don't think it is unkind to recommend a good restaurant. In my experience, it is when you spend more than you should that you most vividly remember the pleasure it brings. I certainly remember my first trip to Taillevent because it cost far more than I thought right or proper. Is that all I remember it for? Certainly not - it was a work of art, fully worth the price. But the fact that they were guilty pleasures made them far more to me than they would otherwise have been.

It doesn't have to be money which causes the pain, of course. You can get a similar feeling for free by spending a day doing hard manual labour in the sun, before sitting in a deckchair with a cold drink. Or, if you are so inclined, you can order fois gras and veal, though in that case the suffering is done for you.

I still urge Embra to go to Taillevent. The menu degustation really is worth donating a kidney for. Though of course you should consider other payment options if you want to go more than once.


Edited to avoid further exposure to criticism.

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Die Capacitrix
We Three Blings


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In regards to expensive restaurants - lunch is often cheaper and has the same quality. If it wasn't for the dress code (jacket required for gentlemen), we might go there the next time we're in Paris. We find dress codes annoying. Living in Switzerland, we're sort of used to food being expensive without needing a dress code.

Our last trip to Paris was in April 2002. The only "rudeness" we ran into was the dog owners that don't clean up after their dogs. [Frown] We were travelling with friends who had a 2 year old. The waiters were more attentive to her (she was very well-behaved) than the adults.

We seem to run into the stereotypical rude middle-aged Englishman. They still think that the sun never sets on the English empire and don't you forget it.

Many of the tourists here arrive on buses. The tour leaders in Luzern have gotten better as they seem to be more conscientious about crossing the street. Many tour groups seem to forget that red means stop. Luzern is not 100% pedestrian zone.

And Jaime:
quote:
Originally posted by Jaime Vargas Sanchez:
That would be assuming that Europeans are accustomed to the idea of travelling a few hundred miles [Wink]

[Big Grin]

--------------------
"Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces." Judith Viorst

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Alex Buchet
I'll Be Home for After Christmas Sales


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Zachary, I apologise.
Posts: 202 | From: Paris, France | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
Ramblin' Dave, quietly making noise
Markdown, the Herald Angels Sing


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Wow, I'd never heard of Taillevent, but after looking at the website, I'd say it's worth a splurge if you can spare it! It looks like I'm going to be a starving grad student for much of my time in Paris, but if the opportunity does somehow arise...

--------------------
Another lifetime I'd have fallen in love with you
Swept away by my feelings, ashamed and confused
But just now it's enough to be walking with you
Let the mystery play as it will! -Lui Collins

Posts: 2669 | From: Jouy en Josas, France | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
jessboo
The First USA Noel


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quote:
Originally posted by Alex Buchet:
quote:
Originally posted by wolfe2dale:
Having grown up in the UK I am a little biased about the French, that said, one of the most common belief's over here is that Disney paris is full of horribly rude people & that you may as well go to Florida where you can, at least, expect good manners & service. Due to this I will be taking my son all the way to the USA for his Disney experience.

Not having been to Disney Paris I couldn't say for sure if any of this is true or not, but it does show how an accepted (British) opinion about rude Frenchmen can effect the average persons holiday plans.

Well, this illustrates well one of the main sources for American francophobia: the irrational prejudice and hatred the English feel for us French; anglophile or culturally intimidated Americans buy into their rancid rigmarole.

"Wogs begin at Calais", eh, Wolfie?

Loyal 'Sun' reader, are you?

Because as we all know, all English people hate the French. [Wink]

--------------------
Join me on Lost - www.lost.eu/edcf

Do you have any wine? All of this would go a lot smoother in an altered state of reality.

Posts: 779 | From: Southampton, England | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a moderator
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